Unit 17Radioactive Decay<br />
  Unstable Atoms<br />When the repulsive forces of the protons exceeds the ability of the strong nuclear force to hold the...
Three Types of Radiation<br />Alpha Particles- 2 protons and 2 neutrons<br />Beta Particles- electron<br />Gamma Rays- Tin...
Alpha Particles<br />* Represented by α (alpha)<br />* They are equivalent to the nuclei of a He atom<br />* (+2) Charge, ...
Alpha Particles<br />* Represented by α (alpha)<br />* They are equivalent to the nuclei of a He atom<br />* (+2) Charge, ...
Conversion From One Element to Another Through Alpha Decay<br />
Dangers of Radon Gas<br />
Radioactive Decay Series<br />
Radioactive Decay Series<br />
Radioactive Decay Series<br />
Radioactive Decay Series<br />
Radioactive Decay Series<br />
Beta Particles<br />Represented by β (beta)<br />(-) Charge, little mass, 100x faster than alpha<br />Basically high-speed...
Beta Particles<br />Equation Example:<br />
Beta Decay Series<br />
Beta Decay Series<br />
Beta Decay Series<br />
Beta Decay Series<br />While it may seem it is cycling around, the difference is it keeps losing mass, thus it turns from ...
Gamma Particles<br />Represented by ɣ (gamma)<br />Electromagnetic wave, no charge (neutral) or mass<br />Great speed, hig...
Radioactivity<br />Alpha, Beta and Gamma Particles<br />
Half-Life<br />Half-life is a measure of the rate of decay of a radioactive element. <br />It is the time it takes for hal...
Carbon-14 Dating<br />
The lack of certain elements on Earth is related to their very short half-lives<br />
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Unit 17 Radioactive Decay

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Unit 17 Radioactive Decay

  1. 1. Unit 17Radioactive Decay<br />
  2. 2. Unstable Atoms<br />When the repulsive forces of the protons exceeds the ability of the strong nuclear force to hold them together, they are unstable.<br />In addition, sometimes nuclei are too heavy and have too many neutrons to remain together<br />
  3. 3. Three Types of Radiation<br />Alpha Particles- 2 protons and 2 neutrons<br />Beta Particles- electron<br />Gamma Rays- Tiny electromagnetic waves<br />
  4. 4. Alpha Particles<br />* Represented by α (alpha)<br />* They are equivalent to the nuclei of a He atom<br />* (+2) Charge, heavy and slow moving<br />*Limited penetrating power, stopped by sheet of paper<br />
  5. 5.
  6. 6.
  7. 7.
  8. 8.
  9. 9.
  10. 10. Alpha Particles<br />* Represented by α (alpha)<br />* They are equivalent to the nuclei of a He atom<br />* (+2) Charge, heavy and slow moving<br />*Limited penetrating power, stopped by sheet of paper<br />Equation Example:<br />
  11. 11. Conversion From One Element to Another Through Alpha Decay<br />
  12. 12. Dangers of Radon Gas<br />
  13. 13. Radioactive Decay Series<br />
  14. 14. Radioactive Decay Series<br />
  15. 15. Radioactive Decay Series<br />
  16. 16. Radioactive Decay Series<br />
  17. 17. Radioactive Decay Series<br />
  18. 18. Beta Particles<br />Represented by β (beta)<br />(-) Charge, little mass, 100x faster than alpha<br />Basically high-speed electrons<br />Stopped by Aluminum Sheet.<br />Changes a Neutron into a Proton<br />
  19. 19. Beta Particles<br />Equation Example:<br />
  20. 20. Beta Decay Series<br />
  21. 21. Beta Decay Series<br />
  22. 22. Beta Decay Series<br />
  23. 23. Beta Decay Series<br />While it may seem it is cycling around, the difference is it keeps losing mass, thus it turns from Ra-228 to Ra-224<br />
  24. 24. Gamma Particles<br />Represented by ɣ (gamma)<br />Electromagnetic wave, no charge (neutral) or mass<br />Great speed, high-energy, very dangerous<br />High penetrating power<br />Only lead can stop them<br />
  25. 25. Radioactivity<br />Alpha, Beta and Gamma Particles<br />
  26. 26.
  27. 27. Half-Life<br />Half-life is a measure of the rate of decay of a radioactive element. <br />It is the time it takes for half of the atoms to decay.<br />Carbon-14 has a half life of 5730 years<br />
  28. 28. Carbon-14 Dating<br />
  29. 29.
  30. 30. The lack of certain elements on Earth is related to their very short half-lives<br />
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