Beyond Education Magazine Abridged Version

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Africa Education Magazine.
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  • 1. Issue: 01 • January/March 2013 NGN 500 | ZAR 27.56 | KES 266 | GHS 5 StudyingAbroad with Kedge Consulting Limited Free Consultation Around the World
  • 2. Join the world’s most International Business School U.S.-accredited One-Year MBA, Executive MBA, Master Programs, and International Bachelor of Business Administration Top-ranked by The Economist and Financial Times Seven global locations - Boston, San Francisco, London, Dubai, Shanghai, New York, and São Paulo Extraordinary student diversity – over 135 nationalities Executive Speaker Series featuring Bill Clinton (42nd President of the U.S.), Jimmy Wales (Wikipedia), Biz Stone (Twitter), etc. hult.edu/africa Contact us at hult.edu/africa or call +971 4 427 5800 Hult International Business School Dubai Internet City, United Arab Emirates
  • 3. Article Reprints: Email info@kedgeconsultingltd.com for all requests. Article proposals and unsolicited articles are welcome. Please submit to the same email. Editor cannot process manuscripts or arts material and we assume no responsibility for their return. © 2013 Kedge Consulting Limited. All rights reserved. Original material may not be reproduced in whole or in part in any form without prior written permission. Editor Kemi Ogunniyi Publishing Editor Olushola Lawal Features Writers Kate Hill Bukola Omotoso Vera Acquah Wilson Kemi Ogunniyi Josemaría Siota Emmanuel Utomi Advertising & Sales Ann Director, Media and Marketing info@kedgeconsultingltd.com +234 8088996167 & +234-09-2913355 www.kedgeconsultingltd.com Editorial Team Beyond Education magazine is published by Kedge Consulting Limited (KCL), a distinct consulting firm with an outstanding approach of bringing appropriate, effective and efficient solutions that impact clients’ businesses positively. We are in the consulting business with a thrust focus on building capabilities and leadership skills at every level and at every opportunity. Postmaster: Send address changes to Kedge Consulting Limited, 103B, First Floor DBM Complex Nouakchott Street, Wuse, Zone 1, Abuja, Nigeria. 3www.kedgeconsultingltd.com January/March | 2013
  • 4. OlusholaLawal CEO Kedge Consulting International Students’ Interaction on Campuses International Students’ Interaction on Campuses UniTeDKingDOm BaCHeLOR’SDegRee3 yeaRS(OR4yeaRSfOR THOSeOpTingfORa1 yeaRpLaCemenT) Requirements: If English is not your first language, you will need a recognised English Lan- guage qualification to be admit- ted onto any of the Universities’ degree programmes. Acceptable minimum qualifi- cations include: IELTS (International English Language Testing System) an overall band of 6.0 with no less than 5.5 in each component skill TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) of 87 (with no less than 21 in listening, 22 in reading, 23 in speaking and 21 in writing) Also, international students must also check that their qualifications meet their chosen school’s entry requirements. International Foundation Cer- tificate courses are available for students that have not met required qualifications. maSTeR’S DegRee (Taught, research-based, or both)Taught master’s qualifi- cations: Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MSc) and Master of Business Administra- tion (MBA) Research master’s qualifi- cations: Master of Research (MRes), Master of Philosophy (MPhil) ReqUiRemenTS Acceptable minimum qualifica- tions include: First degree from a recog- nised university (grades required depend on the university applied to) IELTS (International English Language Testing System) an overall band of 6.5 with no less than 6.0 in each component skill TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) of 94 with no less than 21 in listening, 23 in reading, 23 in speaking and 24 in writing DOCTORaTe Doctor of Philosophy (PhD or DPhil) Students undertake an original piece of research for a minimum of three years at a university. Requirements: Mas- ter’s degree For more info: http://www.ucas.ac.uk/ USaBaCHeLOR’S DegRee(BaCHeLOROf aRTSOfBaCHeLOROf SCienCe)DURaTiOnOf fOURyeaRS The degree is awarded after a certain number of credits (one course is usually three or four credits) and major requirements are completed. For undergraduate admissions, required standardized tests usu- ally include: Scholastic Assessment Test (SAT) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Master’s Degree (usually referred to as ‘graduate study’ in the USA) Types of graduate degrees: Master of Arts (MA), Master of Science (MS), Master of Business Administration (MBA), Master of Education (MeD), Master of Social Work (MSW), etc. Usually lasts two years. For graduate and professional admissions, depending on the course, required tests usually include: Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) Test of Spoken English (TSE) Graduate Record Examinations (GRE) – for liberal arts, science, math Graduate Management Admis- sion Test (GMAT) – for business schools/study for MBA (Master’s in Business Administration) programs Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) Optometry Admission Testing Program (OAT) Law School Admission Testing Program (LSAT) – for law schools Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) – for medical schools Dental Admission Testing Pro- gram (DAT) – for dental schools Please contact individual colleges for specific requirements. DOCTORaLDegRee The minimum length for the pro- gram is three years. A Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test may be required For more information: http://www.ed.gov/ CanaDa BaCHeLOR’SDegRee Depending on the course and the province/area, the degree duration is usually three to four- years maSTeR’SDegRee Lasts two years. Requirements: • Bachelor’s degree • GMAT (for MBA) • GRE (for most science sub- jects) • Demonstration of proficiency in the language of instruc- tion (either English or French, depending on the province). You should confirm the details of the language requirement with the office of admissions of the university or college to which you are applying. DOCTORaLDegRee • Minimum length of three years at a university or university college. • Typically requires the success- ful completion of a Master’s degree. • TOEFL or IELTS as proof of English competency for entry. For more info: http://www.cmec.ca/ http://www.studycanada.ca/ iReLanD BaCHeLOR’S DegRee 3-4 yeaRS The following tests are re- quired, depending on the university: • International English Language Testing System (IELTS) • Cambridge English for Speaker of Other Languag- es (ESOL) • Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) maSTeR’S DegRee (ReSeaRCH-BaSeD, COURSewORK OR COmBinaTiOn Of BOTH) • 1-3 years • Requires successful com- pletion of a Bachelor’s de- gree or Graduate Diploma DOCTORaL DegRee • Minimum of three years at a university. a Comparison of the higher Education systems in the uK, usa, Canada and ireland educational Systems By KatE hill magazineEducationBeyond 8 9 www.kedgeconsultingl td.com 2013 | January/March January/March | 2013 S ince institutions are better meeting points that bring together stu- dents from countries all around the world, a lot of insti- tutions have seen this to be an opportunity for students to learn more about different cultures and respect them. Congregating students from different cultures doesn’t neces- sarily mean they’ll interact, so some institutions are starting to step in, by working on increasing the nationality mix on campus and making it a plus to schools’ learning dynamics and method- ology.  In a new environment, it’s often the easiest to gravitate to what you know. For international students, in particular, language and cultural barriers can mud- dle attempts to have interac- tion in a new school. But in the past few years, universities and colleges across the world have debuted initiatives, orientations, and programmes to encourage cross-cultural interaction. For instance, at Hult Interna- tional Business School, incom- ing students from any country must complete an online test, which is the “Cultural Profile Course” before the start of the programme, which gives the student an idea of cultural profiles and reflection on them- selves. There is also a portal called “MY HULT” which unites all of the students and their fac- ulty professors even before they get to campus.  By bonding online over com- mon interests - such as outdoor sports or community service- students discover they imme- diately share a passion, despite not sharing a culture. There’s a lot of time to get to know each other in ways that wouldn’t happen if they were just thrust into the classroom without the online test or the online discus- sion forum. Minnesota’s Macalester College is also using the days before college to encourage cross-cultural interaction. U.S. students can choose to partake in the school’s international student orientation, which starts a few days earlier than the welcome for domestic students and covers topics including immigration, visas, and even shopping.  “Students really do want to be friends with people from other cultures when they arrive, but the idea of it is a lot easier than the practice,” says Aaron Col- happ, director of international student programs at Macalester College.  Looking to make the most of her college experience, Ma- calester student Amy Janett volunteered for both the orienta- tion and the subsequent Amet- rica program, a weekly meeting of international and domestic students to discuss common obstacles that get in the way of friendships.  “I didn’t realize how different it was for international students to come to school in the U.S. than it was for American students to do so,” says Jannett, who now serves as an international stu- dent program assistant. “I didn’t international students’ interaction on realize all the other obstacles they have to overcome, like getting a visa [and] figuring out finances.”  Though she is now friends with students who come from countries all around the world, Janett says a cross-cultural friendship can require time and patience to build. “I think you have to really want to do it in order for it to happen,” she says.  Today’s learning mostly rewards people who can go beyond borders, understand cultures, and operate in in- ternational contexts. A lot of institutions now encourage more of international students’ interactions, given the world is also becoming a global village. Schools like Hult International Business School keep increas- ing their nationality mix over the years - Hult IBS had around 90 nationalities on campus 3 years ago and last year had 120 na- tionalities on campus and cur- rently for the 2012/2013 intake had 138 nationalities across all programmes. Hult IBS, HEC, INSEAD, LBS and many other schools encourage personal growth, intellectual integrity, global sensitivity, local engagement, and civic values so that students are able to succeed in the global economy and are empowered to contribute meaningfully to their business and community. Universities and colleges around the world want more interaction among international students on their campuses, as it enhances learning. schools rsM insEad iE hult ibs International Student (%) 94% 90% 89% 95% Campus Locations: Rotterdam (Netherland) France, Singapore, Abu Dhabi (U.A.E) Madrid (Spain) Boston (U.S.) San Francisco (U.S.) New York (U.S.) London (U.K.) Dubai (U.A.E.) Shanghai (China) Sao-Paulo (Brazil) The table above: shows 4 of the top 100 business schools in the world and how diverse the student body looks. Campus location has also been added in the table above because it signifies the impor- tance of the diversity within the schools’ campus locations - these locations have their own different contribution to learning as students acquire knowledge in the classrooms and relate this to their day to day activities. educational Systems Campuses magazineEducationBeyond 10 11 www.kedgeconsultingl td.com JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 2013 | JANUARY/MARCH UndergraduateandPostgraduateScholarship By buKola oMotoso Scholarships sCholarshiP Details eliGibilitY Criteria leDien universitY exCellenCe sCholarshiPs for master’s degree at Leiden university, Netherlands candidate must have a Non-eu-eeA passport and must have excellent academic records raDbouD universitY sCholarshiP Any master’s degree at radboud univer- sity, Netherlands. scholarship in form of partial tuition waiver. Deadline is march 15, 2013 candidate must have a non-eeA passport. Dead- line is march 15, 2013 korean Government sCholarshiPs bachelor’s/master’s/PhD in Korea. Dead- line is January 15, 2013 top-performing students from more than 60 countries in Africa, Asia Pacific, the Americas and Europe ameriCan universities sCholarshiP bachelor’s Degree at the American uni- versity. Deadline is January 15, 2013 3.8GPA required Ghent master’s sCholarshiP master’s degree at the university of Ghent, belgium Nationals of: Nationals of developing countries Angola, bangladesh, benin, burkina faso, burundi, cambodia, Dr congo, ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Laos, madagascar, malawi, mali, mozambique, myanmar, Nepal, Niger, rwanda, senegal, tanzania, togo , uganda, Zambia, côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe , Algeria, bolivia, cameroon, china, columbia, Dominican republic, ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana , Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jordan, morocco, Namibia, Nicaragua, Palestinian Administered Areas, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, sri Lanka, thailand, tunisia la trobe aCaDemiC exCellenCe sCholarshiP bachelor’s/master’s Degree in La trobe university, Australia. scholarship is non- renewable candidate must be a citizen of a country other than Australia or New Zealand australian DeveloPment sCholarshiP bAcHeLOr’s/master’s/PhD in Australia. student must return to home country 2 years after completion of studies. Dead- line is march 2013 Nationals of developing countries eiffel sCholarshiP master’s/PhD in france. Areas of study: engineering sciences, exact sciences, economics and management, law and political sciences. Deadline is January 9, 2013 Applicant must be no more than 30 years old eriC bleumink sCholarshiP master’s/PhD at university of Groningen. Deadline is february 2013 Nationals of developing countries ClarenDon sCholarshiP Deadline is January 16, 2013. master’s/ PhD at Oxford university High first class Honours is required uCb international bachelor’s’ degree at university of british columbia, canada. Deadline is January 31, 2013 candidates must be nominated by their current school lunD universitY bachelor’s/master’s Degree at Lund university, sweden. Deadline is January 2013 A selective, merit based scholarship for top aca- demic students Westminster international Deadline is 1 November/31 may. master’s degree at the University of Westminster Nationals of developing countries universitY of tWente sCholarshiP Deadline is 15 December/15 march. mas- ter’s degree at the university of twente, Netherlands top students of non-eeA countries universitY of bern sCholarshiP master’s degree at the university of bern, switzerland. Deadline is December 2012 High-performing foreign students finDers’ universitY master’s/PhD degree at finders univer- sity, Australia. Deadline is August 2012 (annual) candidate must not be a citizen of Australia or New Zealand Common Wealth master’s/PhD in uK. Deadline is Decem- ber 7, 2012 Students are nominated – based on academic merits and other criteria Gates CambriDGe sCholarshiP master’s/PhD at the university of Oxford, uK. Deadline is December 4, 2012 (an- nual) candidate must not be a citizen of the uK sWiss exCellenCe sCholarshiPs PhD in switzerland. Deadline is around Oct-Nov First class degree required sYDneY aChievers international bachelor’s/master’s Degree at the uni- versity of sydney, Australia. Deadline is January 15/June 30 selected high achieving, academically meritori- ous, international students universitY of aDelaiDe sCholarshiPs Deadline is August 31 (annual). master’s/ PhD at the university of Adelaide, Australia First class degree required Quota sCholarshiPs Deadline is December 1 (annual). mas- ter’s/PhD degree in Norway Nationals of developing countries universitY of Western australia master’s/PhD at the university of West- ern Australia. Deadline is August 31, 2012 (annual) First class degree is required melbourne universitY sCholarshiPs master’s/PhD degree at the melbourne university, Australia. Deadline is October 31 (annual) Outstanding international students Opportunities AroundtheWorld sCholarshiP Details eliGibilitY Criteria magazine Education Beyond www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | January/March January/March | 2013 1514 I t was on the 19th day of May 2012, myself and over hundred other young, impact driven volunteers gathered with senior officials from over 15 different governmental and non-govern- mental organizations, commu- nity elders and many guests to enrol 118 children into 3 Schools. These kids, although they looked malnourished and some aban- doned, were filled with so much intelligence. We never knew the impact of what we were doing until that Saturday morning when from those more privileged than we are. Few days later, we began the monitoring and evaluation stage of the project and then decided to go back into the slum, forfeit our jobs, sacrifice our weekdays, train community youths, organize series of outreaches, advocacy visits and after rigorous screening and verification exercise we finally have 200 more children who are willing and desperately waiting to join their mates in school. It has been a journey worth- while, a journey of hope and fulfilment, a road filled with challenges and setbacks yet we stayed steadfast and strong. It really feels inspiring seeing the number of volunteers increase every day. Volunteers, who are willing to take a stand for change and act, rather seat indoors and complain. Young ladies and gents, who will take off their jackets, roll up their jeans and jump into the slum just to secure the future of disadvantaged children. However we have now gotten to another juncture where we quickly need to go across the hurdles. We have been through this before and we believe it wouldn’t be difficult this time around. Can we please give these kids the hope they desire? Yes! We can play our own role and talk to others to play theirs. It costs N30,000 (Thirty thousand Naira only) to sponsor a child for a year and 6Million Naira for 200 Children. Yes, we can do this and just like always, we remain absolutely accountable to every sponsor, donor or partner and we believe that together we can make a difference in their lives. All donations are made into the account of our respected professional partner, Bethesda Child Support Agency. school Project slum2 roam the streets of the slum sell- ing fish. She was 13years old and for 8years, she had never seen the walls of a classroom. I held her and tried to get her back to the others children but she held me tight with tears rolling down her cheeks. Although she looked small and couldn’t express her- self, I could see gratitude written all over her face. As we distributed their school kits according to the names on the enrolment list, we were caught up in another dilemma. Other groups of children who were friends and siblings of our beneficiaries stood looking sad, depressed and rejected. They also needed the same opportunity. They needed to be given a chance to have a bright future. They looked desperate, yet helpless. I could do nothing at this point but watch in pain. Rather than feeling fulfilled after the successful enrolment ceremony, I went back home sad and broken. The thoughts kept running through my mind and their voices couldn’t just cease to echo in my ears. “Uncle you did not give me bag.” “Aunty I also want to go to school.” “Aunty me, Aunty me, Uncle me.” Those were the words they spoke in their local language, which was translated by our community volunteers. Sometimes, we complain of not having enough, but are blessed beyond our imagination to give a million folds. We should count ourselves really opportune if we can read this message. Several times, we try not to care about those less privileged than we are, but we will always need that help Written By: Otto Orondaam (Project Manager and Initiator) we watched tears drop down the eyes of their parents/caregivers and saw how the atmosphere was filled with pouring emotions. I sat down and watched these kids from afar as they presented a cultural dance in appreciation of what had been done for them. I could barely identify them, as they had been totally transformed. They looked so different from the kids we had been with in the slum for months. I couldn’t believe they were the same children we saw playing without clothes and swim- ming in the brackish water. They were well dressed in their new school uniforms with backpacks and had smiles all over their faces. Sotiana, one of my very favourite beneficiaries spotted me and ran towards me; she grabbed me and wouldn’t let go. Her mum was late and she was abandoned by her dad to education Charities ACCoUnt DetAiLs: Bethesda Child Support/Slum 2 School project account number; 1012994165 any branch of zenith Bank follow us on twitter @slum- 2school and @otto_orondaam for more information, please send an SmS to +234 - 8063477974 or email to slumtoschool@gmail.com Slum2School project has won two awards in 2012 so far: The nigerian CSR awards (The SeRas) and The future awards (nigeria). Uncleyoudid notgivemebag. aunty i also want to go to school. Aunty me, Aunty me, Uncle me. magazine Education Beyond 38 39www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | JANUARY/MARCH JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 education Charities Path to Possibilities P ath to Possibilities is a UK-based charity working to support the education of talented but disadvantaged children in Nigeria. We offer scholarships to bright young children, enabling them to continue in their education and assisting in opening doors, thus creating opportunities for them. Our scholarships assist with fees, accommodation costs for boarding school and gen- eral living expenses for these children. Our process for finding our children to support is based entirely on merit and we work very hard to overcome the bar- riers of inequality. In addition to helping individ- ual children, our work focuses on sharing teaching skills, ma- terials and best practices with state-funded primary schools in Nigeria. oUr Vision path to possibilities works to impact on every aspect the lives of our children and the society as a whole through lobbying and campaigning for change in the nigerian educational system. oUr VALUes at path to possibilities we believe in equality, merit, opportunity and a good education for all. oUr initiAtiVes Our fundraising initia- tives include “Race for Change” a 5K& 10K sponsored run and a gala event with the aim of raising as much as we can to enable us achieve our goals for these children. wAYs to GiVe gift Donations Legacy Donations One-off Donations monthly Donations ContACt Us website: www.pathtopossibilities.co.uk facebook: path-to-possibilities Twitter: p2p_nigeria email: info@pathtopossibilities.co.uk press: modemaisonpr@gmail.com FAQ Q: What is Path to Possibili- ties? A: Path to Possibilities is a UK based charity that focuses on providing education for disad- vantaged children in Nigeria. Q: How do you select your children to help? A: Our selection process is based entirely on merit. Q: What do you spend the donated funds on? A: Donations received are spent on school fees, school books, accommodation and living expenses for the children. Q: How can the public get involved in the charity? A: We very much welcome individuals or groups rallying together to fundraise for us. We suggest www.pathtopos- sibilities.co.ukevents such as community events – crafts fair, food & drink – bake sales, performance &entertainment – comedy nights or sponsor- ship for a race or sport by using justgiving.com. Q: What about donation meth- ods? A: We also welcome one off do- nations, monthly contributions, gift donations or legacies Q: How can the public take part in the upcoming Race for Change? A: To secure your place for the upcoming Race for Change, complete the registration form on our website www.pathtopos- sibilities.co.uk & send together with a fee of £10 cheque (per person) to: 1 Warwick Avenue, Cuffley, Hertfordshire EN6 4RU. Alternatively, email us the form and pay the £10 fee through our justgiving account. For more info, please check our website. magazine Education Beyond 34 35www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | JANUARY/MARCH JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 RAISING THE VILLAGE IT’S EASY TO BUILD A SUSTAINABLE WORLD. IT’S EASY TO CHANGE LIVES. RAISING THE VILLAGE IT’S EASY TO BUILD A SUSTAINABLE WORLD. IT’S EASY TO CHANGE LIVES. r aising the Village is an organization that provides critical infrastructure, tools and guidance to recovering villages in Uganda. By working with the villages them- selves, we support community- driven self-sustainable projects that introduce opportunity to es- cape the cycle of extreme poverty. Although there are many tools we use when working with the vil- lages, one of our most important and successful tools is access to education. In fact, education is at the top of our priority list and we always aim to incorporate an educational component into all of our projects. Educational infrastructure can include classrooms, latrines, living quarters for teachers and staff, as well as kitchens. Spe- cific educational tools that we put in place include desks, black- boards, books, and any other essentials needed to provide an effective education experience for the villages. But even with the infrastruc- ture and the tools, what’s most important is that we train the people who work with those tools, and work within the infrastruc- ture. That’s why we provide training to those who will sus- tain the projects once we leave. This may include training school administrators on how to oper- ate self-sustainable school meal programs through community ag- ricultural plots, or how to provide self-sustainable tuition subsidies. How do we know when we’re successful? When we have met our goals. For each educational project we partner with a village to under- take, we have set targets to meet. And these targets are what let us know we are doing things right. For every project we aim to increase in student enroll- ment for both boys and girls, provide all students with the opportunity to complete Pri- mary 7, build a strong school self-governance and admin- istration team, provide school meals for the students, and improve student’s academic performance over time. All of these things together – the partnership developed with the villages, the educa- tion infrastructure we build together, the tools we put in place, and the people them- selves who work to provide the students with an educa- tion, are what make us a success. And what will help make each recovery village in Uganda a success as well. To join us in partnering with the villages, or learn more about our work, please visit: www.raisingthevillage.org. 1 TRADING pLACES Place of birth. Three words. Countless implications. It can mean the difference between turning on the tap to get a glass of clean water to drink and spending five hours of every day to collect water from the near- est swamp so that your family has enough to survive. It can mean the difference between universal access to quality education and never learning to read and write because your family simply cannot afford the annual tuition of six dollars. It can mean the difference between having access to medical care at any time of day and watching your child die of a curable illness. We don’t have a say in where we are born. But, we can restore the balance. The elimination of extreme poverty is within our reach. Let us show you what you can do. There’s a place between relief and development which is rarely mentioned. It’s called recovery. Right now, numerous communities are emerging from a variety of catastrophic events and circum- stances such as violent conflict, the AIDS epidemic and devastating drought. Trying to move forward, these communities frequently find themselves con- fronted with new, often insurmountable challenges. They are at a standstill. But through a recovery project with Raising The Village, they have the opportunity to achieve their goals. Recovery is about putting the key pieces in place which allow a struggling village to get beyond mere survival and grow into a vibrant, thriving community. It’s about simple things: having clean drinking water, access to education and the opportunity to earn a living. It’s a springboard into a brighter future. It does not take very much to forever change the lives of an entire village. But it starts with you. education Charitiesmagazine Education Beyond 3130 JANUARY/MARCH | 20132013 | JANUARY/MARCH www.kedgeconsultingltd.com some 20:1. This reality impacts not just on examinations outputs, but on general quest for knowl- edge and self-advancement. It is a popular fact that a majority non-literate nation is a nation heading for a nose-dive, causing great concern over socio-eco- nomic growth and future national development. Therefore, 1Child1Book has the following objectives: · Give every primary school child an age-appropriate book · To encourage creative thinking and inspire young minds · To build an early foundation for the enjoyment of reading · Establish a sustainable book exchange programme We rely on organisations and individuals to raise the 445,044 books we require to ensure ev- ery child in Lagos State receives a book. Our friends at Books for Africa have generously donated numerous books and indepen- dent authors have pledged a selection of their own titles. Rather than spending our fi- nances inefficiently by collecting and transporting small numbers of books from individuals, we would like individuals to donate money to fund the transporta- tion of the large number (tens of thousands) of books that organ- isations have already pledged to us. Many schools do not have libraries, or where there is a library, they hardly have any books. This is where the project provides books which would go into an existing libary, or a ‘Reading Corner’ in designated classrooms, allowing easy ac- cess to the books for pupils of the school. These books are also used during government allo- cated reading periods. reading by exchanging their books with the options avail- able in the Reading Corner. This gives each child greater access to a variety of books provided and helps teach them the values of sharing and com- munication, by discussing their books with others. 2012 ProJeCts so far We visited UPE Primary School, Festac Town on 1 March 2012, with follow up until June. We gave free books to all the chil- dren there, from Primary 1 - 6. We marked the UNESCO World Literacy Day on 8 Sep- 1Child tember 2012, by launching a reading workshop. These workshops were held at three locations across Lagos on the following dates. - 8 September 2012 (Literacy Lounge) - 13 September 2012 at Fair Life Africa Foundation, Lekki - we spent time supporting their work rehabilitating chil- dren who live on the streets in Lagos. On Thursday majority of the boys pres- ent were from the streets of Oshodi, Lagos, between the ages of 12- 15. We spent time with them in a reading and book summary session, and a talk about importance of care. We plan to return there soon. - 15 September 2012 at Lots Charity Foundation, Dustbin Estate, Agejunle - we spent time with 112 children of LOTS Charity Foundation, in Dustbin Estate of Ajegunle, Lagos. We designed cards which they took home, talked about their future aspirations and had an interactive read- ing session. We strongly believe that when children are exposed to books from a young age, they will be able to Develop an enduring culture of reading. Building early interest in reading from the foundation of Primary Education. Encouraging children’s creative minds as they travel through the stories. Form creative writing skills in their book review. How can you help? Join us by donating to a child’s future today! Visit 1Child1Book.org When free books have been delivered to a school, pupils are presented with the books and given a presentation on the im- portance of reading. This usually includes information about our ‘Reading Corner’ and book ex- change programme. The details are discussed with the relevant Local Government Authority and the Head Teacher in advance. A highlight of the book distri- bution event is spending time with the children while they read age-appropriate books. We give them opportunities to ask for help, in recognising new words, pronouncing words and giving the meaning of words. We feel this initial reading session is a crucial part of the introduction of books to the pupils during the distribution event. Once students have fin- ished reading their books, we encourage them to continue 1 child1book is an initiative that aims to put a book in the hand of every primary school child in Nigeria, beginning with one of Africa’s most populous cities, Lagos. The project is linked to UNESCO’s World Literacy Day, held on 8 September every year. It is spearheaded by a Non- Governmental Organisation called TJF (Tosin Jegede Foundation), a brainchild of Nigerian former child singer, Tosin Jegede. Here are some statistics that spurred 1child1book volunteers into action: · Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, is ranked 142 of 169 countries for adult literacy (UNESCO Institute for Statistics 2010a). · Lagos is the most populous conurbation in Nigeria, with a population of over 7 million, and estimated to be the 2nd fastest growing city in Af- rica and the 7th fastest in the world. · There are 502,000 primary school children in Lagos state. (Lagos State Ministry of Edu- cation 2009/2010 data) · 20 children to 1 book ratio cur- rently (observed data) tosin JeGeDe on 1ChilD1book: The illiteracy rate is high in Nige- ria today. A child being bought or given a book, that is not a neces- sary school text, is a luxury in Nigeria. The Lagos State govern- ment has put in place free basic education for children and has followed on from that by passing the law to ensure all children go to school. Research shows the average ratio of students to books in most local schools stands at a worri- education Charities 1book magazine Education Beyond 36 37www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | JANUARY/MARCH JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 of the colleges are in various Universities under the Rochas Foundation University Scholar- ship Scheme. The pioneer stu- dents also have an established reunion club called the Rochas Foundation Royale Club. Until the full take off of the university, the challenge is for us to ensure this good work does not die or be limited. The gradu- ates of the Rochas Foundation colleges require further studies to attain their dreams fully. milestones The first National examina- tion the students of the pioneer college in Owerri participated in was the JSSCE (NECO) in 2004. It is on record that the entire group passed and qualified for an award as out of the 80 stu- dents, there were no re-sits, and the final results were As – Cs with only a few Ps. This record has been surpassed over and over again from 2005 till date. The Senior Secondary Certificate Examination (SSCE) which was first taken in 2007 also recorded that none of the students merely passed the subjects - they were awarded A -C grades, and it has continued to be a 100% pass rate ever since. Over 5, 000 students have ben- efited from the Foundation’s Col- lege Educational sponsorship. health anD soCial resPonsibilities The foundation health activities include: Funding of treatments for pa- tients with special ailments such as kidney transplants and other overseas-treatment needs Donation of drugs and hospital equipment to hospitals, and free sponsored vaccinations against dreaded diseases Reach Out and Touch- a monthly and annual event that caters for poor people- as well as other community develop- ment programmes such as the provision of electricity, bridges and other infrastructural facili- ties. eConomiC emPoWerment Under the foundation’s Econom- ic Empowerment Programme (ECEP), the foundation has as- sisted underprivileged Nigerians to start small scale businesses, organised various programmes to empower being to be self- reliant as well as provision of motor vehicles and motor bikes by free-interest loans. other aCtivities Rochas Foundation Volunteer Corps The Rochas foundation has a Volunteer Corps made up of individuals from different sectors of the economy with the vision to help educate one million indi- gent children both through free secondary school education and free university education by the year 2015. The vision is tagged “Every Child Counts”. As a mark of gratitude for the foundation’s initiatives, some of the highly accomplished musicians and artistes led by Nigeria’s pop star 2face Idibia rallied in specific ways to raise public awareness and endorse free education in Nigeria by lending their voice and talents to the Rochas Foundation Volunteer corps theme song called “Every Child Counts.” task aheaD The foundation intends to take off with the university (Africa’s first free university for the poor) in no distant time. This will cater for secondary school graduates hoping to further their educa- tion. We also want to reach out to more people outside the shores of Nigeria and of course open more colleges across Nigeria. The foundation is therefore opening its doors to individuals and organisa- tions who may wish to sponsor any number of our students for higher institution education or en- courage the building and equip- ping of the Rochas University, so that the dreams of young, poor Nigerians can be maximised. In the words of the founder: “It is my dream that these re- jected and neglected children who have lost hope of going to school will one day become leaders in their respective areas of endeav- ours and change the entire world for good through giving.” It is our ardent hope that many more people would support the foundation through material resources, services, prayers and goodwill so that the foundation can grow in years ahead. As the foundation repositions for greater heights, its aim is to educate 1 million less-privileged children within the next 5 years. ForsPonsorshiP AnDotherenQUiries, PLeAseContACtUs: Rochas foundation Headquar- ters, Unity House, plot 1041 ahmadu Bello way, garki, area 11, abuja, nigeria. www.rochasfoundation.net info@rochasfoundation.net follow us at @info_rochas Like our page on facebook: Rochas foundation rochas Foundation…reaching out and touching lives to assuage adolescence and other juvenile tendencies in children and teens while they grow so that they can channel their energies positively. Rochas Foundation launched its first college in Owerri in year 2001, and today has colleges in Kano, Jos, Ibadan and Ogboko, Imo State, all in Nigeria with plans to open new ones including the Rochas Foundation University. The colleges operate the Nige- rian basic school curriculum and have been applauded for main- taining a high record of academic excellence each year. Apart from the over 12 subjects of choice taught at the Colleges, Rochas foundation empowers students with non-academic skills in sports, communication skills, sewing and other crafts. The foundation has been com- mitted to providing free tuition, books, uniforms, boarding and hostel facilities, feeding, medical care, transportation, provisions as well as monthly allowances. For students who excel exception- ally in their studies, a free holiday package to the United States of America is sponsored and more than 36 students have enjoyed this. With the increasing, growing profile of the Rochas Founda- tion worldwide, the foundation is planning to establish more colleges, and also launch the Rochas Foundation University in Ogboko, which will be the first free univesity in the world. This university will cater to graduates of the Foundations’ colleges. Currently, over 700 students about roChas founDation Rochas Foundation was incor- porated under the Company and Allied Matters Act of 1990 on 24 February 1998 in Nigeria as a non-governmental, non-profit making and non-political organ- isation with the aim of service to God and humanity. It caters for education, health care, scholarships, job security & placements, career develop- ment, economic empowerment and direct interventions. Through the Rochas Foundation, hope has been restored to many Nigerians. It is borne out of one man’s avowed commitment to the work of charity and philanthropy- Ro- chas Owelle Okorocha. eDuCation The foundation’s vision for educa- tion is comprehensive with focus on the children of the poorest of the poor in the Nigerian society. The founder’s difficulty in at- tending school as a child made him birth this cause as a positive means of bringing these children out of poverty, misery and social oblivion. The Rochas Foundation Col- lege, which “educates to em- power,” has over the years helped education Charitiesmagazine Education Beyond 40 41www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | JANUARY/MARCH JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 EducationCharities EducationalSystems Raising the village....................................30 Slum2 School Project...............................38 Path to Possibilities..................................34 Rochas Foundation …reaching out and touching lives......40 1Child 1Book.................................................36 A Day in the Life of a School Teacher.....43 How to Improve Your Analysis Hult International Business SchoolUndergraduate and Postgraduate Scholarship Opportunities Around the World Nonye Mpho Omotola PAGE 18 PAGE 12 PAGE 3 PAGE 8 PAGE 10 PAGE 13PAGE 14 Case Study Interview: Table of Content 4 January/March | 2013 Educ
  • 5. Destination Dubai A lmost every country in the world would like to bring in the top and brightest specialists to its univer- sities or schools (and tap into some of that intellect in their economy), but not all have the means to do so. Although the U.S. and Europe still lead many of the lists of best uni- versities, other countries , even some developing ones, are working hard to deliver some stern international competition, build- ing enormous education cities and cutting-edge universities that are designed to bring in students from all over the world. While some still have a long way to go, others are proving that top-tier higher education is go- ing to be a far more global game in the near future. In the past 15 years or so, Dubai has become a fabulous tourist destina- tion with its world class structures and world records- breaking hoteling industry. It has also come into international spotlight for the number of Internationally-recognized, top class universities it houses. It is no surprise that Dubai is jump- ing on the education hub band- wagon, as the country is known for doing just about everything on a grand scale. Dubai has vigorously pursued branch cam- puses from top schools around the world, building an aston- ishing range of international branch campuses that includes programs at over 25 differ- ent colleges from around the world. These programs are accommodated in four different education hubs in Dubai: Dubai Knowledge Village, Dubai International Financial City, Dubai Health Care City, and Dubai Silicon Oasis. It caters to the needs and demands of its people in every aspect of life- be it tourism, education or business; Dubai continues to be viewed an extremely attractive destination for aspiring professionals. It is a dynamic, multi-cultural city, attracting people that come in search of the countless op- portunities and endless pos- sibilities that the bustling city has to offer. The city offers a moderately cheaper choice for students to live in and pursue their education. . Every one of the schools caters to a specific type of student and many are linked with programs from big name schools like Harvard, Cambridge, Boston Univer- sity, Heriot Watt University, American University Dubai, Canadian University Dubai, Middlesex University and HULT International Business School, to mention just a few that of- fer students a chance to get a degree at the bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral levels, offering uncompromised qual- ity and affordable educational programmes. No doubt Dubai is leading the way in becoming an education hub, for itself and in years to come, will be a place to be recog- nised for its major contribution in education in the world map. destination dubai magazine Education Beyond www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | January/March January/March | 201356 57 2 inspire Network is an organisation that provides platforms with the aim to empower and inspire women. It is an organisation that brings together a wealth of expertise, like minds and collaborative opportunities. The aim is for professionals in the network to come together to build connections across sec- tors and influence change for other women. The network also provides forums and events that allow women in business to pro- mote, network and inspire Promote: Businesses can promote their products and services via our social medium platforms and our website. We also provide physical platforms in the form of events and exhibitions for businesses to promote them- selves which provide fantastic opportunities for businesses to showcase their products and services. We launched the event titled 2inspire Ladies in August 2012 which was a great success and had over 200 in attendance. At that event we had women run businesses exhibiting their products and services which not only helped exhibitors to develop their business presence and brand but was also a great av- enue which allowed for them to connect with the public, allowing them to build a prospect data- base, build new relationships with clients and reinforce exist- ing ones. On the day we also ran Lifestyle workshops that dem- onstrated how to look and feel good and business & personal development workshops with the aim to empower and support networking community which allows for community members to support and encourage each other through collaboration and the sharing of business contacts and opportunities.  The community will allow members to connect with the right people, market their business and grow their rev- enue. Networking should be viewed as a long term strat- egy for any business due to the many benefits a business can gain in terms of contacts, leads and referrals. Joining the 2inspire Network members community will have a number of amazing benefits for mem- bers which will include:   • Getting your business added to the 2inspire Business Di- rectory which will be distrib- uted via directing marketing campaigns to our fast-grow- ing database. • Getting your business fea- tured and promoted on the 2inspire network fortnightly blog. 2inspire network attendees in creating a crystal clear vision for their business & personal growth. Feedback from the event from both exhibitors and attendees was fantastic and our next Ladies day is taking placing on Saturday 9th March 2013 at the Crowne Plaza hotel in Dock- lands to coincide with Interna- tional women’s day. This event will be a great celebration of the ‘Creativity of Women’ and will have activities and workshops to meet every woman’s needs. A 2 hr slot in an on-site crèche will also be available for attendees who will need help with child care on the day.   netWork: Networking is essential for busi- ness success as it opens you up to a diverse range of busi- nesses. In April 2013 we will be officially launching a members • Being invited to free busi- ness meetings held for members to network their business, connect with like minded individuals and get key business tips from guest speakers. • Accessing exclusive dis- counts to purchase busi- ness products and services and to attend business events. •  Getting discounted rates to exhibit at 2inspire network events and affili- ated events. • Getting leverage from the knowl- edge of others • Receiving refer- rals from mem- bers who you have built a business relationship insPire: We aim to inspire others and endeav- our to do this via a various number of mediums. We provide platforms for businesses that provide a product or service that can in- spire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, we encour- age them to share their knowledge and inspire others. Inspir- ing individuals is the core objective of the network and so we want to help to share their message and their passion and to make a positive impact in people’s lives. To those who have what it takes to inspire others:   • We can introduce them to a number of collaborative op- portunities • We can organise workshops for them to facilitate • We can help them to share their message or success story. • We can promote their workshops or products and services magazine Education Beyond 54 55www.kedgeconsultingltd.com2013 | January/March January/March | 2013 Award, Icon Awards, Icon of Hope Award, Young Achievers Award and many more. He is the Founder/Chief Execu- tive of many profit and not-for- profit organisations in Europe, North America and Africa which includes Make Impact Interna- tional, GLEEHD Foundation for Leadership and International Development, Make Impact Group (MI Intl, MI Enterprise, MI Media, MI Publication, Impact Productions, Impact Invest- ments and more). He is also a spokesperson for Young Nigerians and Africans in Diaspora in his capacity as Chief Executive of the Africa Diaspora Youth Forum and Coordinator of Nigerian Youth in Diaspora Organisations. He also currently serves as a British Red Cross Humanitar- ian Citizen Ambassador, Young General Assembly (YGA) Spe- cial Representative to United Nations Meetings, Youth for Transparency International (YTI), Special Representative to the United Nations and Language Ambassador for the National Center for Languages.  After losing his Dad at age 11, Dayo was raised by a single mum in the slum of Lagos Main- land, helping his mother in her daily business hawking shoes and African wears to enable them feed the family and have a livelihood. However during those days, Dayo’s dream kept push- ing him forward. He started the only child-led NGO in Nigeria at that time – General Action Against the Violation of Hu- man and Children’s Rights – an organisation which spearheaded the campaign for the promotion of children’s rights in Nigeria. As a result, he was elected into the Nigerian Children’s Parlia- ment at the age of 14 and rose to the position of the Deputy Senate President of the National Children’s Parliament until his retirement.  He also pioneered a lot of advocacy towards the enact- ment of the Child Rights Act in Nigeria and the development of the Juvenile Justice Frame- work in the Country. At 16, He was appointed the Chairman of the Presidential Summit of Nigerian Children alongside leading the Nigerian Chil- dren delegation to the United Nations Special Session on Children in New York where he was featured live on CNN and Nickelodeon with Carol Bella- my, the then UNICEF Executive Director. In 2004, at the age of 18, Dayo and his team of young people singlehandedly hosted the Annual Young General Assembly Annual Session in Nigeria with about 200 young people in attendance from all over the World.  He attracts a lot of posi- tive media attention and has featured on CNN Q & A Live, Daystar Christian Broadcast- ing Network, Nickelodeon, BBC Network Africa, Ben Television, OBE TV, BBC World Service, NTA Newsline, and T.V Africa. He produces and presents Maximum Impact with Dayo Israel on Dove Vision TV. He has made headlines on various national newspapers such as Swazi Today, The Comet newspa- per, The Punch newspaper, Tribune newspaper and The Nigerian Guardian. dayo israel I n this segment, we present some young people who have successfully taken advantage of good education and be- come formidable forces in their societies. In this issue, we focus on Dayo Israel from Nigeria, a young man of humble beginnings of a Lagos slum, who has risen over the years to become a Youth Leader in Africa and around the world. His special interests include: Children’s Rights, Educa- tion, Environment & Climate Change, Human Rights, In- tercultural Dialogue, Poverty Relief, Social Entrepreneurship and Youth Work. Dayo Israel (LLB (Hons), MA International Relations) is an astute motivational speaker and advisor to many world leaders, business executive, politicians, young entrepreneurs and sports professionals. He is an internationally recognized personality and has appeared on countless television interviews, commercials, talk shows, radio programs, and was selected by the United Nations to represent all the young delegates to the UN General Assembly Special Session on Children on a special CNN Live Interview. Recently, He was specially invited by Queen Elizabeth II and the Duke of Edinburgh to a private reception at Buckingham palace.  In addition to being a So- cial Entrepreneur, in demand Evangelist, TV Personality, Mo- tivational Speaker, Diplomat, Youth Advocate, Facilitator, and High Performance Coach; He has served in various capaci- ties globally including in the Nigerian Government and the United Nations. Dayo has ex- ceptionally trail-blazed and set the pace for many other young people in his generation. He is also the first African to be- come a Student Council Chair in London’s Largest University and a recipient of so many International Awards which includes the British Red Cross Humanitarian Citizen Award, PEWA (Person Earnestly Work- ing for Africa) Award, GAB youth leaders of our generationmagazine Education Beyond 26 27JANUARY/MARCH | 20132013 | JANUARY/MARCH www.kedgeconsultingltd.com S ay you are a university undergraduate studying Mathematics, how would you feel if your little sister in her first year in primary school came to you with one of her arith- metic problems? Confident, I bet! The probability that you would be able to solve the problem little sister brings is almost certain because in that area, you have built up competences that are relevant to this particular situa- tion at various times in your past. At such an occasion your feeling of self-confidence will soar very high. However, this may not be the case if on the other hand you are a Music undergraduate and have over the years developed a passionate dislike for mathemat- ics and any subject that seemed numeric. When little sister comes along with her arithmetic problem, your self-confidence would not be as high as that of a Mathematician (even if after all you could solve little sister’s problem). Here’s another instance: imagine you were driving home at night on a deserted highway with no street lights. Sudden- ly your car stopped working and the only knowledge you have about a car is how to get into the car, insert the ignition key in the right place, start the car and zoom off. Of course, your first feeling would be that of exaspera- tion or helplessness. Yet, if you were a trained mechanic, even though you know help may not come as early as expected, your level of self- confidence would give you some assurance that you would not be stranded. My point is, you will enjoy self confidence in a particular area to the extent that you understand the situation and your abilities as they relate to the circumstances. Merriam-Webster’s dictionary defines self-confidence as “Con- fidence in oneself and in one’s powers or abilities.” I guess that definition is clear enough but it also throws up another question: defining what confidence is. The same dictionary defines confidence as “A feeling or con- sciousness of one’s powers or of reliance on one’s circumstances.” Well it would appear that both definitions are similar to a very large degree. What it therefore means is that self confidence is actually a FEELING or CON- SCIOUSNESS about one’s abilities as it relates to a particu- lar situation. I’m be- ginning to think that it is possible that we humans do not have the same degree of self confidence at all times - the degree of self confidence you feel may be subject to the situ- ation at hand. Isn’t that quite interest- ing? When I read this, one word that jumped out of me is the word KNOWL- EDGE. Invariably, self-confidence is knowledge-based. The feeling or consciousness of your abilities is a of this fact, they think of my friend as highly self- confident. • Confront these fears or obstacles. Ask yourself why you seem to have self-confi- dence issues in these areas of your life. Write down your answers in bullet-point style. List these fears by name and identify them one by one. • Ask yourself, “Has anyone on earth overcome these same fears or obstacles and gone on to enjoy personal success in these areas?” • What were the things they did to gain confidence? Are they things I can apply directly to my life or do I just copy the underlining principles? • What would life be like if I had the self-confidence I cur- rently lack in these areas? Or better put, what freedom or successes am I forfeiting presently because of this lack of self-confidence? • What would I have to do (no matter how little everyday) based on what I know to help me regain my self-confi- dence? Finally, believe me when I say we were all born confident. As a baby, apart from falling and sudden loud noises, you had no real fears. You knew no dan- ger, did anything, anytime and anywhere, regardless of who was watching. YOU WERE THAT SELF-CONFIDENT. So how come you don’t try all these things now with your natural self-confidence? What I think happened to us all is that in certain areas, life slapped and kicked us to submission. Well, some submitted, but others looked life in the eye and said, “Is that the best you’ve got?” They fought back until life’s troubles gave up and let them have their way. These same people who took the bull by the horns are those we celebrate as the brave and con- fident today. We desire to be like them because they have had to fight many battles. Some lost and others won but the thing about the brave is that they never gave up until they won. This means building self- confidence is not a destination but a journey. Since life is a variable continuum, it will keep throwing new challenges at you over and over again but it is your job to always reach deep down into the resources within YOU and say “I AM MORE THAN THIS, IS THAT THE BEST YOU’VE GOT?” building your self-Confidence stayontop emmanuel Utomi is a coach, self-awareness and management consultant with a focus on personal growth. He is a certified ImL-DIsc Advanced business and Applied christian behavioural Analyst. He qualified as an Advanced Life skills coach from Stonebridge Associated colleges (uK), and holds a bsc in Actuarial science and msc in management. By EMManuEl utoMi function of what you know, think you know or do not know about your abilities. If all this sounds a little technical, just relax and let’s break it down. In life, the knowledge you need in order to enjoy self-confidence is actually self-image - how you see yourself. Your self-image is the picture of YOU that you hold inside. It is that picture, more than anything else, that drives who you are and how you conduct yourself, the things you do as well as things you don’t do, the places you go, the type of people you choose to associate with, your style and mode of dressing, your choice of colours - the list is simply endless. Your outer life of ‘reality’ is actually a mirror image of your inner life of thought and imagination. In Psychology, this is called the Law of Consideration – as is within, so it is without. Think about it. tecHNIQues tHAt mAy HeLP buILD yOur seLf-cONfIDeNce • Itemise the areas of your life where you feel you have low self-confidence or lack it en- tirely. These are mainly areas that you would usually try to steer clear of. For some we have placed our fear of these areas above the fear of death itself. For instance, would you believe I have a 45-year- old successful friend who is afraid of driving and has vowed never to attempt it? To some who are unaware Be inspired Iammore thanthis,is thatthebest you’vegot? magazine Education Beyond www.kedgeconsultingltd.com52 532013 | JANUARY/MARCH JANUARY/MARCH | 2013 StudentProfiles AcademicInstitutions Suzan Erinola AraoyePAGE 20 PAGE 22 PAGE 24 PAGE 26 PAGE 54 PAGE 56PAGE 52 PAGE 19 PAGE 45 PAGE 50 PAGE 48 PAGE 47 Dayo Israel Be Inspired: Building your Self-Confidence By Emmanuel Utomi 2inspire Network 2inspireNetwork Destination Dubai European University of Lefke Study at the University of Stellenbosch Business School and discover the advantages of studying business in Africa Middlesex University Dubai American Embassy, Nigeria Kevin Opute Ike Amadi Youthleadersofourgeneration: 5www.kedgeconsultingltd.com January/March | 2013 magazine Education Beyond magazine cation
  • 6. D uring last year I was preparing engineers and business students around the world to enter top strategy consulting firms such as: McKinsey1 , BCG2 and Bain3 . My focus was case interviews, which is the core of the application process of these companies. In this short article I am going to explain 3 aspects: what a case interview is; a common mistake people make during case inter- views; how to solve it with the MECE Principle. WhatisaCaseInterview? Case interviews are usually in the form of a project’s simula- tion with a consultant, who explains a problem to you and asks you to solve it. For that, you create a route- map to analyze the entire problem, before giving the solution. As you know, consultants are paid for results, so, they don’t nor- mally have a lot of time to analyze all the possible data, or repeat the analysis so many times. They have to prioritize the most important aspects to analyze and be careful about decomposing the problem, and in consequence, the analysis. Common Mistake When candidates do their analyses, the common mistake seems to be that many of them divide the data, leaving parts of it out or treating it more than once. So they don’t do a good analysis because on one hand, they are not considering the data correctly, and on the other hand, they are not being efficient because they spend too much time on analysis. HowtoSolvetheProblem How to Improve Your Analysis Case Study Interview: Consultants frequently use the MECE principle. MECE means “Mutually Exclusive and Col- lectively Exhaustive” 4 . It is a grouping principle for separating a set of items into subsets. The choice of subsets should be: • Mutually exclusive: no sub- sets should represent any other subsets (“no overlaps”) • Collectively exhaustive: the set of all subsets, taken together, should fully en- compass the larger set of all items (“no gaps”) The MECE principle is use- ful to map processes or create structures where the optimum arrangement of information is exhaustive and does not double count at any level of the hierar- chy5 . An example of MECE ar- rangements is seen in the categorization of people by age (assuming all years are known). A non-MECE example would be categorization by nationality, because nationalities are nei- ther mutually exclusive (some people have dual nationality), nor collectively exhaustive (some people have none). “1 “McKinsey & Company Official Web- site”. Available at: wwwmckinsey.com 2 “The Boston Consulting Group Official Website”. Available at: www.bcg.com 3 “Bain & Company Official Website”. Available at: www.bain.com 4 Rasiel, Ethan (1999). “The McKinsey Way” (1st ed.). McGraw-Hill. 5 Rasiel, Ethan and Friga, Paul (2001). “The McKinsey Mind: Understanding and Implementing the Problem- Solving Tools and Management Techniques of the World’s Top Strategic Consulting Firm” (1st ed.). McGraw-Hill. AbouttheAuthor As a former Deloitte consultant, resumé screener and case interviewer, Josemaría Siota mentors thousands of aspiring consultants via his coaching. As a candidate, he passed and received offers from 7 top Consulting Firms and finally chose the offer with Deloitte. He is an Engineer, attended some courses at IESE Business School and was ranked 1st of class in his last master in International Business. Today he is managing his own Strategy Consulting Firm and advises companies internationally with start- up level to $10 million in revenues. magazine Education Beyond 12 January/March | 2013
  • 7. (BOSTON–November6th,2012) Hult has long been attracting students from around the world, reflecting the diversity of an increasingly global workforce. A recent article1 argued that for a business school to be truly global, it should have interconnected campuses in the world’s three main economic regions – the Americas, Asia and Europe. Hult, with campuses in Boston, San Francisco, London, Dubai and Shanghai (plus a rotation center in São Paulo), certainly meets this criteria. But it isn’t just the campus loca- tion that counts; it’s also how much students hailing from over 135 countries can learn from each other about doing business in international markets. At Hult, local knowledge is brought into the classroom and students are encouraged to work with local companies and NGOs on experi- ential Action Projects to solve an innovation or growth challenge. In fact, the entire curriculum is built around sharing ideas and con- cepts internationally, with Hult’s Global Rotation Program students 1 Hawawini, Gabriel, Journal of Management Development, 2005. are encouraged to move around, and experience the school’s global campus network. In a report published last year, the Association to Advance Colle- giate Schools of Business warned that for many business schools, ‘globally ready’ faculty members are in short supply. Many of Hult’s faculty members, on the other hand, have British, American, and emerging market expertise and travel frequently between campuses, taking time to teach students about the cultural, legal, and economic differences between different regions. Student’s readiness to em- brace educational diversity is in- creasingly popular. Hult’s more than 2,400 students speak more than 100 languages, and over 34% of students are trilingual. More than 20% of students hail from emerging BRIC economies, and 40% of the students are female. The mobility of Hult’s students is also significant, with 60% finding work outside of their country of origin after graduation. “Thanks to our five global campuses and our internation- ally minded faculty, we’ve been able to connect our students with a world of opportuni- ties,” said Hult President Dr Stephen Hodges. “Our faculty members represent more than 30 nationalities, and over 70% have an industry background in international markets. It’s that kind of diversity that puts us far ahead of other busi- ness schools and prepares our students for employment in the global workforce.” AboutHultInternational BusinessSchool Hult is the world’s most in- ternational business school with campuses in Boston, San Francisco, London, Dubai, Shanghai, and a rotation centres in New York and São Paulo. The School offers a range of business-focused programs including MBA, Executive MBA, Master and Bachelor degrees. Hult’s one- year MBA program is ranked 1st in International Experi- ence and 3rd in International Business by the Financial Times, and 31st the world by The Economist. Hult International Business School Offers the World’s Most International Education with Students from over 135 Countries, Speaking 105 Languages As top-ranked business schools race to expand their international presence, Hult has already established a global network of campuses across 4 continents. 13www.kedgeconsultingltd.com January/March | 2013
  • 8. UndergraduateandPos By Bukola Omotoso Scholarships SCHOLARSHIP DETAILS ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA Ledien University Excellence Scholarships For master’s degree at Leiden University, Netherlands Candidate must have a Non-EU-EEA passport and must have excellent academic records Radboud University Scholarship Any master’s degree at Radboud Univer- sity, Netherlands. Scholarship in form of partial tuition waiver. Deadline is March 15, 2013 Candidate must have a non-EEA passport. Dead- line is March 15, 2013 Korean Government Scholarships Bachelor’s/Master’s/PhD in Korea. Dead- line is January 15, 2013 Top-performing students from more than 60 countries in Africa, Asia Pacific, the Americas and Europe American Universities Scholarship Bachelor’s Degree at the American Uni- versity. Deadline is January 15, 2013 3.8GPA required Ghent Master’s Scholarship Master’s degree at the University of Ghent, Belgium Nationals of: Nationals of developing countries Angola, Bangladesh, Benin, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, DR Congo, Ethiopia, Gambia, Guinea, Haiti, Laos, Madagascar, Malawi, Mali, Mozambique, Myanmar, Nepal, Niger, Rwanda, Senegal, Tanzania, Togo , Uganda, Zambia, Côte d’Ivoire, Ghana, Kenya, Nigeria, Pakistan, Vietnam, Zimbabwe , Algeria, Bolivia, Cameroon, China, Columbia, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Guatemala, Guyana , Honduras, India, Indonesia, Jordan, Morocco, Namibia, Nicaragua, Palestinian Administered Areas, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Sri Lanka, Thailand, Tunisia La Trobe Academic Excellence Scholarship Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree in La Trobe University, Australia. Scholarship is non- renewable Candidate must be a citizen of a country other than Australia or New Zealand Australian Development Scholarship BACHELOR’S/Master’s/PhD in Australia. Student must return to home country 2 years after completion of studies. Dead- line is March 2013 Nationals of developing countries Opportunities AroundtheWorld magazine Education Beyond January/March | 201314
  • 9. stgraduateScholarship Eiffel Scholarship Master’s/PhD in France. Areas of study: engineering sciences, exact sciences, economics and management, law and political sciences. Deadline is January 9, 2013 Applicant must be no more than 30 years old Eric Bleumink Scholarship Master’s/PhD at University of Groningen. Deadline is February 2013 Nationals of developing countries Clarendon Scholarship Deadline is January 16, 2013. Master’s/ PhD at Oxford University High First Class Honours is required UCB international Bachelor’s’ degree at University of British Columbia, Canada. Deadline is January 31, 2013 Candidates must be nominated by their current school Lund University Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree at Lund University, Sweden. Deadline is January 2013 A selective, merit based scholarship for top aca- demic students Westminster International Deadline is 1 November/31 May. Master’s degree at the University of Westminster Nationals of developing countries University of Twente Scholarship Deadline is 15 December/15 March. Mas- ter’s degree at the University of Twente, Netherlands Top students of non-EEA countries University of Bern Scholarship Master’s degree at the University of Bern, Switzerland. Deadline is December 2012 High-performing foreign students Finders’ University Master’s/PhD degree at Finders Univer- sity, Australia. Deadline is August 2012 (annual) Candidate must not be a citizen of Australia or New Zealand Common Wealth Master’s/PhD in UK. Deadline is Decem- ber 7, 2012 Students are nominated – based on academic merits and other criteria Gates Cambridge Scholarship Master’s/PhD at the University of Oxford, UK. Deadline is December 4, 2012 (an- nual) Candidate must not be a citizen of the UK Swiss Excellence Scholarships PhD in Switzerland. Deadline is around Oct-Nov First class degree required Sydney Achievers International Bachelor’s/Master’s Degree at the Uni- versity of Sydney, Australia. Deadline is January 15/June 30 Selected high achieving, academically meritori- ous, international students University of Adelaide Scholarships Deadline is August 31 (annual). Master’s/ PhD at the university of Adelaide, Australia First class degree required Quota Scholarships Deadline is December 1 (annual). Mas- ter’s/PhD degree in Norway Nationals of developing countries University of Western Australia Master’s/PhD at the University of West- ern Australia. Deadline is August 31, 2012 (annual) First class degree is required Melbourne University Scholarships Master’s/PhD degree at the Melbourne University, Australia. Deadline is October 31 (annual) Outstanding international students SCHOLARSHIP DETAILS ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA www.kedgeconsultingltd.com January/March | 2013 15
  • 10. I am a 2nd year master’s degree student at Moscow Power Engineering Institute, Moscow, Russia. I am studying Computer En- gineering, started in 2007 and would be completing my mas- ter’s program in June, 2013. I chose Computer Engr. because I was very strong in Maths. It was easy for me to choose Russia. Russia is a great country, highly advanced in science and technology, and a world leader in my field. Who wouldn’t want to be trained in a country like this? Student life in Russia can be exciting or boring, depending on the person involved. You ba- sically have to create your own excitement and fantasies. There are a few of students groups, which if you choose to belong to, could keep you on your toes all year round. Because of the nature of the country - as regards the weath- er, most students have their computers as their best friends. However, joining many of the student groups can keep your blood flowing. Student accommodation in Moscow is very okay. We live in hostels as staying in apart- ments in Moscow can be quite beyond the reach of many non- working students. The hostels could be foreign- ers only or mixed with Rus- sians. I stay in a foreigners only hostel. On the average, we live two persons per room. There are chances that a student might get to live alone if he or she is of good behav- iour and can afford the extra bed-space. As regards making new friends, if you show yourself friendly, you’ll always have the opportunity of making new friends. We survive the cold years here on the buddy system. What I mean is that we form close- knit niches that have us sup- porting one another. You can make friends in the university, the hostels and in public places like churches or for the party- ing kind, clubs. Ike Amadi StudentProfilesmagazine Education Beyond 22 January/March | 2013
  • 11. My university has a student union government in which every country is represented. We or- ganise several programs all year round. Right now, we are playing a soccer competition with other soccer-loving countries. The Nigerian team has been a strong contender for the gold medal. Most times we get the gold, last year however, we got the silver. That made us sad. I hardly get homesick. I’ve got too much going on to let that idea come through my mind. I however keep in touch with my family every week, at least. My advice to intending inter- national students would be for them to properly find out if the university of their choice offers the course they intend to pursue. They could find out from a stu- dent who attends that university. More so, if anyone considers Russia as an option, let them prepare their minds to learn a new language- which is fun I think - and which they might end up studying in. I study in the Russian lan- guage. Is the language tough? I would say no. In the beginning, a lot of things might not make sense, but if you work hard, are patient and dedicate time to your studies, you’ll get a hang of how things work around here. Do svidania! (‘till we meet again’ in Russian). StudentProfiles 23www.kedgeconsultingltd.com January/March | 2013
  • 12. Education Beyond Education Beyond 1 Nigeria (NGN 500) 2 South Africa (ZAR 27.56) 3 Kenya (KES 266) 4 Ghana (GHS 5) 5 Angola (AOA 301) 6 Zimbabwe (USD 3) 7 Botswana (BWP 24) 8 Ethiopia (ETB 56) 9 Namibia (NAD 27) 10 Tanzania (TZS 4966) B eyond Education magazine is a quarterly issue published and distributed in different parts of Africa (Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, South Africa and others). Every issue gives an insight into the world of education, informing readers about the education options available around the world, thereby connecting them to business education professionals and stakeholders. The magazine also seeks to cover best practices, news, events, product and services. Our magazine is aimed at helping our readers become informed and up to date with innovations in every area of the education sector. Our editors and writers stay in touch with the industry through the different forms of social networking, interviews with professionals and adequate research. Magazine Subscription Beyond Education, Kedge Consulting Limited Phone: +234 8088996167 & +234-09-2913355 Email: info@kedgeconsultingltd.com Web: www.kedgeconsultingltd.com Education Beyond
  • 13. n Foralimitedofferperiod, Why Should You Advertise With Us? Our magazine is circulated among a niche audience of young and influential males and females (16-60 years old) who are interested in further and higher education - a large percentage of any African country. Target them! Readership of at least 70,000 from over five countries Competitive pricing for all our advertisers. We also offer custom packages that are guaranteed to satisfy our clients. $500! Special offer! Ann Contact us to develop your advertising campaign: advertiseonourmagazineforjust Director, Media and Marketing info@kedgeconsultingltd.com +234 8088996167 & +234-09-2913355 www.kedgeconsultingltd.com
  • 14. R aising the Village is an organization that provides critical infrastructure, tools and guidance to recovering villages in Uganda. By working with the villages them- selves, we support community- driven self-sustainable projects that introduce opportunity to es- cape the cycle of extreme poverty. Although there are many tools we use when working with the vil- lages, one of our most important and successful tools is access to education. In fact, education is at the top of our priority list and we always aim to incorporate an educational component into all of our projects. Educational infrastructure can include classrooms, latrines, living quarters for teachers and staff, as well as kitchens. Spe- cific educational tools that we put in place include desks, black- boards, books, and any other essentials needed to provide an effective education experience for the villages. But even with the infrastruc- ture and the tools, what’s most important is that we train the people who work with those tools, and work within the infrastruc- ture. That’s why we provide training to those who will sus- tain the projects once we leave. This may include training school administrators on how to oper- ate self-sustainable school meal programs through community ag- ricultural plots, or how to provide self-sustainable tuition subsidies. How do we know when we’re successful? When we have met our goals. For each educational project we partner with a village to under- take, we have set targets to meet. And these targets are what let us know we are doing things right. For every project we aim to increase in student enroll- ment for both boys and girls, provide all students with the opportunity to complete Pri- mary 7, build a strong school self-governance and admin- istration team, provide school meals for the students, and improve student’s academic performance over time. All of these things together – the partnership developed with the villages, the educa- tion infrastructure we build together, the tools we put in place, and the people them- selves who work to provide the students with an educa- tion, are what make us a success. And what will help make each recovery village in Uganda a success as well. To join us in partnering with the villages, or learn more about our work, please visit: www.raisingthevillage.org. Education Charitiesmagazine Education Beyond 30 January/March | 2013
  • 15. some 20:1. This reality impacts not just on examinations outputs, but on general quest for knowl- edge and self-advancement. It is a popular fact that a majority non-literate nation is a nation heading for a nose-dive, causing great concern over socio-eco- nomic growth and future national development. Therefore, 1Child1Book has the following objectives: · Give every primary school child an age-appropriate book · To encourage creative thinking and inspire young minds · To build an early foundation for the enjoyment of reading · Establish a sustainable book exchange programme We rely on organisations and individuals to raise the 445,044 books we require to ensure ev- ery child in Lagos State receives a book. Our friends at Books for Africa have generously donated numerous books and indepen- dent authors have pledged a selection of their own titles. Rather than spending our fi- nances inefficiently by collecting and transporting small numbers of books from individuals, we would like individuals to donate money to fund the transporta- tion of the large number (tens of thousands) of books that organ- isations have already pledged to us. Many schools do not have libraries, or where there is a library, they hardly have any books. This is where the project provides books which would go into an existing libary, or a ‘Reading Corner’ in designated classrooms, allowing easy ac- cess to the books for pupils of the school. These books are also used during government allo- cated reading periods. When free books have been delivered to a school, pupils are presented with the books and given a presentation on the im- portance of reading. This usually includes information about our ‘Reading Corner’ and book ex- change programme. The details are discussed with the relevant Local Government Authority and the Head Teacher in advance. A highlight of the book distri- bution event is spending time with the children while they read age-appropriate books. We give them opportunities to ask for help, in recognising new words, pronouncing words and giving the meaning of words. We feel this initial reading session is a crucial part of the introduction of books to the pupils during the distribution event. Once students have fin- ished reading their books, we encourage them to continue 1 child1book is an initiative that aims to put a book in the hand of every primary school child in Nigeria, beginning with one of Africa’s most populous cities, Lagos. The project is linked to UNESCO’s World Literacy Day, held on 8 September every year. It is spearheaded by a Non- Governmental Organisation called TJF (Tosin Jegede Foundation), a brainchild of Nigerian former child singer, Tosin Jegede. Here are some statistics that spurred 1child1book volunteers into action: · Nigeria, the most populous country in Africa, is ranked 142 of 169 countries for adult literacy (UNESCO Institute for Statistics 2010a). · Lagos is the most populous conurbation in Nigeria, with a population of over 7 million, and estimated to be the 2nd fastest growing city in Af- rica and the 7th fastest in the world. · There are 502,000 primary school children in Lagos state. (Lagos State Ministry of Edu- cation 2009/2010 data) · 20 children to 1 book ratio cur- rently (observed data) Tosin Jegede on 1Child1Book: The illiteracy rate is high in Nige- ria today. A child being bought or given a book, that is not a neces- sary school text, is a luxury in Nigeria. The Lagos State govern- ment has put in place free basic education for children and has followed on from that by passing the law to ensure all children go to school. Research shows the average ratio of students to books in most local schools stands at a worri- Education Charitiesmagazine Education Beyond 36 January/March | 2013
  • 16. Our MBA is internationally accredited by EQUIS and AMBA. Our MBA is internationally accredited by EQUIS and AMBA.