HUNG, DRAWN AND   A critique of                     the culturalCULTURAL QUARTERED   quarter                     developme...
 The Cultural Quarter policy in the UK       C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  dates back to the 1980s – with perhaps  Shef ...
 They are based around (one, some or all)   C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  of the following criteria     Flagship singul...
 They are planned by institutions using               C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  templates defined by the level of  r...
 Shef field’s Cultural Quarter once was an    C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  industrial workshop area  (cutlery, potterie...
 March 1999 saw the opening of the             C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  National Centre for Popular Music (£15m)   ...
 Salford is home to MediaCityUK and the             C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  surrounding Salford Quays area MediaC...
 This large scale urban regenerative policy   C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  (akin to other Media Cities) are  internatio...
 Bristol’s Stokes Croft is an area with no    C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  ‘planning’ interventions as such, but high  ...
 Creation of a ‘buzz’ is critical         C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s High student numbers and a reliance on   S h e f...
 CQs are used as ingredients of a creative        C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  city brand, but are limited in their usa...
 Creativity requires a relaxation of          C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s  planning laws, not a reinforcement of  them ...
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Hung, Drawn and Cultural Quartered

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Hung, Drawn and Cultural Quartered

  1. 1. HUNG, DRAWN AND A critique of the culturalCULTURAL QUARTERED quarter development in the UK Oli Mould U n i ve r s i t y o f Salford
  2. 2.  The Cultural Quarter policy in the UK C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s dates back to the 1980s – with perhaps Shef field and Manchester’s Northern S h e f f i el d Quarter the first examples (Montgomery, 2007) Salford They have evolved from clusters of cultural and creative (economic) activity B r i s to l to meta-planned urban regeneration initiatives C r i t iq u e Identified at least 31 in the UK so far…
  3. 3.  They are based around (one, some or all) C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s of the following criteria  Flagship singular development S h e f f i el d  Boutique and/or chain retail  Leisure facilities  Collection of incubator spaces Salford B r i s to l C r i t iq u e
  4. 4.  They are planned by institutions using C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s templates defined by the level of redevelopment desired and the economic S h e f f i el d opportunities available Salford Intricate plans exist that ‘map’ out successful cultural quarters – they must include (Montgomery, 2007: 308) B r i s to l  Production (Creative arts)  Distribution (technological and infrastructural) C r i t iq u e  Consumption (food, retail and entertainment) Other categorizations have included the ‘engineered and the vernacular’ (Shorthose, 2004)
  5. 5.  Shef field’s Cultural Quarter once was an C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s industrial workshop area (cutlery, potteries and small -scale metal S h e f f i el d forgers) Salford A city -based CIQ ‘Area Action Plan’ was put in place in 1988 to use cultural activity to regenerate area B r i s to l The Workstation and other incubator C r i t iq u e spaces were set-up out of old dis-used industrial buildings
  6. 6.  March 1999 saw the opening of the C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s National Centre for Popular Music (£15m) S h e f f i el d Attempt to establish the Quarter as an ‘reassertion of the local in a global space Salford of cultural flows’ (Brown et al., 2000) B r i s to l After hoping to attract 400,000 visitors a year, it closed 15 months later after only attracting 104,000 C r i t iq u e
  7. 7.  Salford is home to MediaCityUK and the C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s surrounding Salford Quays area MediaCityUK houses the relocated BBC S h e f f i el d departments, IT V and a host of other independent T V production and post - production facilities (move started in 2011) Salford This CQ is owned by Peel Group and hence is a privatized, heavily -policed area B r i s to l Cultural or creative activity is strictly housed within corporatized agendas C r i t iq u e
  8. 8.  This large scale urban regenerative policy C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s (akin to other Media Cities) are internationally -focused S h e f f i el d Reliance on local creative community is Salford secondary B r i s to l Creating an enclave of elitism in a highly deprived part of the Northwest C r i t iq u e
  9. 9.  Bristol’s Stokes Croft is an area with no C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s ‘planning’ interventions as such, but high levels of creative activity S h e f f i el d Grass-roots cultural activity – active Salford engagement with homelessness & unemployed B r i s to l Its anti-hegemonic stance is considered an attraction for freelance creative workers C r i t iq u e
  10. 10.  Creation of a ‘buzz’ is critical C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s High student numbers and a reliance on S h e f f i el d night-time culture/economy Salford However, squatting, social unrest and crime are problems that emanate from B r i s to l such a policy C r i t iq u e Start of the gentrification process…?
  11. 11.  CQs are used as ingredients of a creative C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s city brand, but are limited in their usage of creativity S h e f f i el d Often, creativity & culture are used to justify or excuse existing urban Salford development schemes (Peck , 2005; Atkinson and Easthorpe, 2009) B r i s to l CQ templates devised by public -private ‘late’ capitalist agendas (private consultants etc.) C r i t iq u e They often enforce marginalization of sub- cultural activity (unless in a pastiche or sanitized manor) Restricts of ‘pop-up’ or ‘DIY urbanism (Deslandes, 2012), which the creative industries thrive upon
  12. 12.  Creativity requires a relaxation of C u l t ur a l Q u a r te r s planning laws, not a reinforcement of them S h e f f i el d Creativity and innovation (which are Salford important planned outcomes (Montgomery, 2007)) often stems from failure B r i s to l CQs in the UK are viewed as a way ‘out’ of C r i t iq u e economic stagnation… …but they have typified contemporary neo-liberal place-based policy interventions – and in so doing repel the every activities they claim to be crucial success factors

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