Climate change

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  • 1. Climate Change – does it really exist? Pavel Alekseychik Khanty-Mansijsk, April 2014 Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 2. Brief CV • Started at the Russian State Hydrometeorological University (RSHU) at St.Petersburg at 2006 • Continued at the University of Helsinki at 2009, obtained Bachelor’s and Master’s degree there • Currently at the end of the 3rd year as a PhD student at the group of micrometeorology • Main interests: biogeochemical cycles in the northern ecosystems, climate-ecosystem interactions, micrometeorology, technology and warfare of the Middle Ages Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 3. “Climate – the history of weather on the timescale of 50 year or longer” Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 4. 1. Climate IS changing. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 5. Judging by the cave art of Sahara, that place used to be one huge thriving oasis full of life Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 6. Look at some Dutch Renaissance paintings, 16th – 17th centuries weren’t too warm. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 7. You can find a trend in any measurements, like temperature here. So is this showing the changing climate? Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 8. Periodic climate changes may be found to have affected our civilization Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 9. Looking at a longer period (Vostok ice core), we still see variation, with a higher amplitude and period Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 10. Ocean water level is of importance for coastal areas. Not so much for Siberia… Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 11. The ice ages cause the variation in sea level of more than 100m Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 12. 2. The scale of change Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 13. It makes a lot of sence to record some quantities for a Long time. You just might see a trend. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 14. Add more measurements, and you will see more trends. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 15. Derive at what happened to those variables a long time ago, and you will have a better perspective. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 16. 3. Driving forces behind the climate change Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 17. Carbon cycle is probably THE main cycle on earth. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 18. A “dead-end” of the carbon cycle: C accumulation In the form of natural gas/oil/coal Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 19. Unstable peatland carbon pools Siikaneva peatland, Finland Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 20. Unstable peatland carbon pools Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 21. Some microbes living in peat exhale CH4; industry also does that CH4 produces a much stronger heating effect than CO2. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 22. Methane emissions from natural ecosystems are Strongly controlled by temperature, but what has caused this rise in the last 300 years? Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 23. Tectonic activity - a rare, but crucial force [Siberian trapps, thought to have triggered the Permian climate change and extinction event] Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 24. Tectonic activity - a sporadic, but crucial force Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 25. Milankovitch cycles: Earth orbital changes are correlated with its climate Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 26. 4. The climate is constantly adjusted by the greenhouse effect Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 27. Greenhouse effect Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 28. IPCC assessment of effects on climate Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 29. IPCC: real people Timo Vesala Sigrid Dengel Martin Heimann Jouni Räisänen Veli-Matti Kerminen… Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 30. 5. But it’s not just about carbon cycle… - feedbacks! Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 31. BVOC emissions by the forest - biological volatile organic compounds BVOC Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 32. BVOC seen as “blue haze” BVOC Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 33. Feedback loop: rising CO2 leads to lower temperature?? Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 34. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 35. ALBEDO effect: snow masking Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 36. Interhemispheric CO2 difference versus anthropogenic emissions Anthropogenic Emissions of CO2 CO2 (Northern)- CO2 (Southern) Ref.: Prof. Martin Heimann Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 37. 5. Synthesis: use all the known relations to predict the future climate Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk
  • 38. Pavel Alekseychik, University of Helsinki 2 April 2014, Khanty-Mansijsk