Social media policies in universities
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Presentation at the Social Media Conference At Ft. Worth, Texas, 2013

Presentation at the Social Media Conference At Ft. Worth, Texas, 2013

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  • The Pearson Education Inc, Most Recent study, titled "Social Media for Teaching and Learning," found that 41 percent of faculty surveyed used social media as a teaching tool in 2013, compared to around 34 percent in 2012. In addition, more than half of higher education faculty replied that they use social media platforms for professional purposes in 2013.
  • University of Kentucky and University of Louisville are required to surrender their social media privacy if a monitoring system catches any red flags in their social media postings. Writing a social media policy that passes muster with the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) can be an exercise in semantics. In his latest memo on the topic, NLRB Acting General Counsel Lafe Solomon on May 30 provided a detailed analysis of six social media policies he found to be in violation of labor law, and one he held up as a model.A University of Kansas journalism professor was placed on indefinite administrative leave Friday for a tweet he wrote about the Navy Yard shootings which said, "blood is on the hands of the #NRA. Next time, let it be YOUR sons and daughters."Some labor attorneys praised the memo for providing a model policy for employers to follow. But ambiguities remain, and the differences between policy clauses found acceptable and others found problematic sometimes come down to the choice of words.At issue is whether social media policies violate employees’ right, under Section 7 of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA), to communicate or work together in “concerted activities” for the purpose of collective bargaining or to improve working conditions and terms of employment. Employers in both union and nonunion workplaces who terminate or discipline an employee based on a social media posting that the NLRB finds to be “protected concerted activity”—such as a Facebook conversation among employees complaining about pay—may be violating Section 7.
  • Information gathered from this study will be of interest to a consultant, or a practitioner who tries to create social media policy for IHE or promotes the best practices in designing such policies. This study also raises the level of understanding of the use of social media at universities and colleges. It addresses such issues as striking a balance between using social media for official agency interests and allowing all employees and students to utilize SM for personal and professional interests. In general, the author is looking to reconcile the need of a university community for free information flow and free speech with issues of accountability, security and privacy.
  • All five policies list Marketing and Communication Departments or Marketing and Media departments as responsible parties .None of them state that the policy is the product of a university-wide committee. In the case of the Sam Houston State University, the author found newspaper articles (Rice, 2011) that described the controversy around the first version of its SM policy. When the first version was created by staff of the Marketing & Communications Department, students demonstrated against it, and as a result a new Social Media Committee was formed to include students, faculty and staff in re-designing the policy. The linguistic analysis - marketing discourse, a few policies use almost identical language to describe the purpose of the SM: “university’s institutional voice” and “social media is a conversation” brought more than 100 social media policies that utilize similar phrases. Another popular “brand ambassadors”. Traditional legal language. Another sign of the involvement of legal counsel is that a significant portion of the text is devoted to restrictions and consequences of unlawful actions. Direct, hidden or indirect messages Images of social media in policies: as a risk or a potential problem or as a resource. In most of the policies we can find messages that are supposed to warn, to prevent a reader from any wrongful action, and social media is seen as an administrative or legal problem. In some policies SM is also seen as a resource. In this case, we can see direct messages to urge a reader to join a community, start posting on behalf of a university, and promote the university, department or unit and so on. Based on the text analysis, the restrictive messages prevail.
  • An over-restricted or over-censored academic online community that follows the rigid template of a social media policy, may be less of an informal community and more like a formal organization. Social media as a technology is not conducive for creating formal communication.

Social media policies in universities Presentation Transcript

  • 1. GET GET CONNECTED CONNECTED Internet Services Social Media Policies in Universities Empirical study GET IN TOUCH. +55 WWW.GETCOMM.CA kozolga@gmail.com or tweet44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA olgakoz1 GETIN@COMM.CA
  • 2. GET CONNECTED TABLE OF CONTENTS • Information Layout Slide with Table 3 • Information Layout Slide with Bar Graph 4 • Information Layout Slide with Pie Chart 5 • Thank You 6 TIRED OF WATCHING THE CLOCK? FASTER SPEEDS GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 3. GET CONNECTED SM in Universities The literature: Creating faculty or students’ learning communities Improving online learning Knowledge management in academic institutions Surveys: Marketing and recruiting (ACUTA, 2010) Personal and classroom use (Pearson, 2013) Figure 1 University of Massachusetts Dartmouth Center for Marketing Research. GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 4. GET CONNECTED Social Media Policies Are they common? According to the 2011 Dartmouth study (Figure 2), 44% of respondents have a written social media policy for their schools. Why do universities issue them? • • . Protection of employer and employees DCMA, NRLB, accounts monitoring Preventive policy and based on real cases – cases at KU & Northwest Missouri State U. Figure 2 GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 5. GET CONNECTED Empirical Study Questions 1. Who develops SM policies on campus? 2. What are the main goals and purpose of creating these polices? 3. How do creators of the SM policies perceive the roles of social communication technology in the university? 4. What are the main messages of these policies? Purpose of the study To create social media policy for IHE To raise the level of understanding of the use of social media at universities and colleges. To reconcile the need of a university community for free information flow and free speech with issues of Knights Foundation , 2011 accountability, security and privacy. GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 6. GET CONNECTED Methods • Krippendorff „s(2004) hermeneutic circle (the process of recontextualizing, reinterpreting, and redefining the research question) • OA “content” and text analyzing applications (Coding Analysis Toolkit) to check high-frequency words, to view words in context, to create concordances, and to study patterns in texts and salient messages. GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 7. GET CONNECTED Findings Policy makers – Marketing or Communication Department/ Legal Counsel Policies Purposes - regulate the employer liability and risk management/reputation management Social Media Roles – promotion, marketing, image building, relationship building and support “conversation”, sharing information Messages Authenticity and transparency (1 policy) Protecting confidential information (5 polices) Protecting university’s reputation (4 policies) Respecting copyrights (5 policies) Developing a social media strategy (1 policy) Respecting your audience (4 policies) Obeying terms of service on specific platforms (4 policies) Resource or liability? Nor references to learning , employee engagement, use in the classroom Restrictive messages prevail GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA Retrieved from http://www.coseom.com WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA
  • 8. GET CONNECTED Discussion • Policy and guidelines should be written by a group which include all stakeholders • Bureaucratize and centralize a process of communication or to build an academic community • Reference to existing communication policies • Include guidelines with less restrictive language GET IN TOUCH. GETIN@COMM.CA WWW.GETCOMM.CA +55 44 8956.888800, W. GEORGIA AVENUE, 175 VANCOUVER BC, CA