Celebrity narratives

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Celebrity narratives

  1. 1. Celebrity<br />Narrative trajectories<br />
  2. 2. We Build them up...<br />Celebrities as demi-Gods<br />We idolise celebrities, look up to them<br />The mass media are more than happy to build a celebrity up, so long as it fits their needs. <br />Tiger Woods – Superstar, first billionaire sportsmen, spokesperson for the black community in a traditionally white sport. LEGEND!<br />
  3. 3. To knock them down...<br />Celebs have a shelf life, and the mass media will jump on a bandwagon of destruction as quick as appreciation. <br />Tiger Woods: cheating, philandering, sex addict and sex pest!<br />
  4. 4. Tabloidisation of Culture<br />There seems to be a focus on this kind of soft news, a focus on gossip, scandal, emotions, spectacle, stereotyping and simplification.<br /> The PR machine that is the media is constantly seeking and creating narrative disequilibrium to keep the celebrity in the spotlight. <br />
  5. 5. Feminisation of our Culture<br />This obsession with celebrity could be a signifier of the feminisation of the culture we live in. <br />Rather than an interest in hard news (politics, the economy, international relations) the celebrity focuses on appearance, relationships, scandal and gossip. <br />All traditionally aligned to feminine gender roles. <br />
  6. 6. Narrativisation<br />We are therefore encouraged to narrativise our own lives to the same degree as the media create narratives for celebrities.<br />‘Hermes’ – Suggests we create stories of people’s lives, and therefore this allows audiences to relate and identify with these celebrities. <br />
  7. 7. Narratives of Self<br />Giddens– To a further degree it could be argues that we are encouraged to use celebrities as ‘navigational points’ in the construction of our own identity. <br />The narrativisation and tabloidisation of celebrity lives can be transferred to our understanding of our own lives. <br />

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