Healthy Eating (Marivic)
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Healthy Eating (Marivic)

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Healthy Eating (Marivic) Healthy Eating (Marivic) Presentation Transcript

  • Marivic R. Gustilo HEALTHY EATING
  •  
    • “ Let thy food be thy medicine and thy medicine be thy food.” -- Hippocrates (c. 460 B.C.) the Father of Medicine
    • Eat foods in their most natural and whole state.
  • Do you know what this is?
    • Ingredients:
    • Corn, Vegetable Oil (Contains one or more of the Following: Corn, Soybean, or Sunflower Oil), Buttermilk Solids, Salt, Tomato Powder, Partially Hydrogenated Soybean Oil, Corn Syrup Solids, Corn Starch, Whey, Onion Powder, Garlic Powder, Monosodium Glutamate, Cheddar Cheese (Cultured Milk, Salt, Enzymes), Nonfat Milk Solids, Sugar, Dextrose, Malic Acid, Sodium Caseinate, Sodium Acetate, Artificial Color (Including Red 40, Blue 1, Yellow 5), Spice, Natural and Artificial Flavor, Sodium Citrate, Disodium Inosinate, and Disodium Guanylate.
  • Have these beauties instead!
  • The less processed the food, the more life-giving it is!
  • Foods should be fresh, clean, devoid of pesticides and chemical residues Cooked foods should not be stored for more than a day.
    • Eating only when truly hungry.
  • Are you a stress eater?
    • You have a favorite comfort food.
    You seem to feel better after that “quick fix.” When you’re feeling anxious or tired, you reach for sugar, salty, fatty foods.
    • True hunger arises only when the physical body is well rested and the mind is calm, free from tempestuous moods. Foods eaten at this time is preventive of ill health.
    • Clear sign of true hunger: a liking for sattvic (plain, non-appetizing, natural, wholesome, unstimulating) food.
  • Emptying of the Stomach Rest and recuperation of the digestive organs Elimination of all waste / toxic filth Abundance of vital energy in the body Birth of hunger and its maturing until full digestive powers is developed
    • If you are going to do mental or physical work in the morning, eat a light and right breakfast.
  • Scientific studies have shown just replacing your normal breakfast with the 'Butts & Cup of Joe' breakfast you will significantly reduce unwanted extra pounds...
  • Traditional Filipino Breakfast Fare
  • Much better!
    • Eat your substantial and principle meal for the day at a time when work that follows is not too heavy.
    • Work and digestion cannot go on at the same time.
    • Work will compete for Vital Energy and there will not be enough left for digestion of food, which then ferments and putrefies.
    • Eat to live in health, not live to eat.
    • One should eat for sake of health and efficiency, not for pleasure of eating.
    • Pleasure is a by-product, which can result in better digestion.
    • Consume only the quantity of food needed.
  • Rule of the Ancients
    • “ Two quarters of the belly space should be filled with food; one should be reserved for drinking water when needed; the fourth quarter should be left free for the movement of the breath.”
    • Test for Right Eating: A feeling of lightness and wellbeing.
    • 6. Choose foods which are most suitable for your basic mind-body constitution.
  • Astringent Bitter Sweet Sour/Salty Spicy Astringent/Sweet Have the 6 tastes represented at each major meal.
  • Remember…
  • Remember…
  • What is your dosha?
  • Balance Pitta Vegetables Fruits Dairy Nuts Spices Grains Sweet and bitter Asparagus Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cucumber Cauliflower Celery Green Beans Leafy greens Peas Parsley Green peppers Potato Squash Sweet Fruits Apples Avocados Figs Dark grapes Mangoes Melons Oranges Pineapple Plums Prunes Raisins Buttermilk Unsalted butter Soft cheese Milk Ghee Coconut Coriander Cinnamon Cardamon Fennel Basmati rice Oats, Barley Wheat All legumes, except lentils Oils : Coconut, sunflower, soy, Olive Sweetner : Most
  • Balance Kapha Vegetables Fruits Dairy Nuts Spices Grains Pungent and bitter Asparagus Beets Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Cauliflower Celery Garlic, onions Peas Spinach Potato Apples Apricots Berries Cherries Cranberries Figs Mangoes Peaches Prunes Pomegranates Buttermilk Ghee Goat’s Milk Goat’s Cheese No nuts All spices are good Basmati rice Oats, dry Barley, millet Wheat, corn All legumes, except kidney beans, soybeans, and black lentils Oils : Almond, sunflower, corn Sweetener : Raw Honey
  • Balance Vata Vegetables Fruits Dairy Nuts Spices Grains Cooked Asparagus Beets Carrots Cucumber Garlic Green beans Onions, cooked Sweet potato Radishes Leafy vegetables (in mod) Sweet fruits Apricots Avocados Bananas Berries Cherries Coconut Fresh figs Grapefruit Lemons Grapes Mangoes Sweet melons Sour oranges Papaya Peaches Sour fruits Buttermilk and all dairy in moderation All nuts in moderation All spices are okay Cooked oats Rice Wheat No legumes, except mung beans, black and red lentils Oils : Ghee and olive oil Sweetener : All but white sugar
  • 7. Support your local organic farmers and producers.
  • 8. Eat in a way that is gentle and compassionate to the earth .
    • Eat in a relaxed manner, thankful for nature’s gift of food and for the knowledge you have of your relationship with God and the universe.
    • 10. Let the practice of conscious and healthy eating reconnect you with what is joyful, nurturing, life-giving, and Spirit-filled.
  • REFERENCES
    • Davis, R.E. (1996). An easy guide to Ayurveda: The natural way to wholeness. New Delhi: B. Jain Pubs.
    • Gowans, S. (2004). Ayurveda for health and well-being. Mumbai: Jaico Publishing House.
    • Saram, K.L. (1993). Speaking of nature cures. New Delhi: New Dawn Press Group.
    • Sivananda Yoga Vedanta Centers. (1999). The Yoga Cookbook. London: Gaia Books Limited