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Good Practice When Buying or Using a Local Exhaust Ventilation System
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Good Practice When Buying or Using a Local Exhaust Ventilation System

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Sergeant Derek Miller...

Sergeant Derek Miller
Occupational Health Technical Officer, Royal New Zealand Air Force
Directorate of Air Force Safety and Health, HQ485 Wing, RNZAF Base Auckland, Auckland 0662
derek.miller@nzdf.mil.nz

(P17, Wednesday 26, Civic Room 2, 2.30)

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  • No process modification required Requirements are plain eg welding or solder fume
  • Exposure benchmarks – (this is the exposure that may result once the system is in place, normally a fraction of a substances ezposure limit) need to be realistic and may require specialist advice. However in mixes etc there may not be exposure limits so may have to use the toxicity or safety phrase from SDS – This area should not constrain the designers or suppliers. Indicators – simple could be a warning light for go to red for change filter Easy to use etc – accessibility, skiin contamination, waste removal, filter changing etc without spreading contamination Training – Supplier provides training in how to use, check and maintain system User manual – describes system, how its used, check. Maintained and tested, performance benchmarks and part replacemnet schedules where necessary Logbook – record results of checks and maintenance
  • Describe the errors in this system
  • Constraints – number of hoods in use at one time

Transcript

  • 1. Good Practice When Buying or Using a Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV) System Sergeant Derek Miller – Occupational Health Technical Officer, Royal New Zealand Air Force [email_address] OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 2. Aim
    • Help you to have a systematic approach to LEV
    • Provide advice on how to work with designers and suppliers
    • Where to get additional information or help to avoid expensive mistakes
    • To control exposures effectively
  • 3. Overview
    • Legislation/ACOP’s
    • What is LEV?
    • Is LEV appropriate
    • LEV Specification
    • Criteria for Specification
    • Suppliers Quotation
    • References for further reading
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 4. Legislation
    • Health and Safety in Employment Act 1992
    • Health and Safety in Employment Regulations 1995
      • Regs 4, 5, 7, 66 and 67
    • Spray Coating Regulations 1962
    • Resource Management Act 1991
  • 5. What is LEV
    • Engineered control system to reduce exposure to airborne contaminants
    • Comprises:
      • Hood
      • Ducting
      • Air cleaner/arrestor
      • Fan
      • Discharge
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011 From HSG258
  • 6. IS LEV Appropriate?
    • Consider the hierarchy of control before applying LEV
    • Number of sources (may be many)
    • Contaminant cloud (may be to large)
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 7. LEV Specifications(1)
    • Simple system
      • Standard design
      • May be off the shelf
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 8. LEV Specifications (2)
    • Complex systems
      • Non-standard design
      • Requires input from Employer and Supplier
        • Containment cloud (source, speed, direction etc)
        • Work process requirements
        • Operators requirements
        • Lev Hood – Type, size, airflows etc
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 9. Criteria for a Specification
    • Describe
      • Process, contaminant, its hazards, source
      • Any exposure benchmarks
    • Should require:
      • indicators to be fitted
      • the system to be easy to use, check, maintain and clean
      • training to be provided
      • user manuals
      • logbook
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 10. Inlets Outlets
  • 11. Suppliers Criteria to Employers
    • Potential Suppliers Should Provide:
      • Technical drawings
      • Number and type of hoods for each location
      • Provide info on any constraints
      • Info on balancing system
      • Info on air cleaners
      • Fan/air mover specification
      • Info on air cleaner efficiency and sensors
      • Describe indicators/alarms
      • Info on installation requirements
      • Info on what training will be provided
      • A user manual and a logbook
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011
  • 12. Ensure
    • Commissioning Data
    • Technical Drawings (as built)
    • User manual
    • Log Book
    • Any checks are carried out by competent persons
  • 13.  
  • 14. Some References
    • Controlling airborne contaminants at work – A guide to local exhaust ventilation (LEV) – HSE(UK)
    • Industrial ventilation – A manual of recommended practice – ACGIH
    • Industrial ventilation – A manual of recommended practice for operation and maintenance – ACGIH
    • Safe use of chemicals in electroplating and related industries – DoL
    • The safe occuptional use of glutaraldehyde in the health industries – DoL
    • Health and safety in welding – DoL
    • COP – Safe use of Isocyanates
    • COP – Management of Substances Hazardous to Health
    OHSIG – Wellington 26 – 28 Oct 2011