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Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
Politics Of Dominica
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Politics Of Dominica

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  1. Politics of Dominica (1890 – 1980, and the present) Done by: Nicholas Tang Darryl Ho Benjamin Leong 09A10
  2. Background <ul><li>1838: Slavery was abolished. Dominica was notable as the only British Caribbean colony to have a Black-controlled legislature in the 19 th century. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Most of the Black politicians and legislators were merchants who had opposing points of view from the small and wealthy English population. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Because of this perceived threat, the English population lobbied for more direct British rule over the Black-controlled government. </li></ul><ul><li>1865: After a period of much tension and conflict, the elective assembly was replaced, with half of its memebers elected and the other half appointed. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The appointed planters sided with the British colonial administration to defeat the elected Black legistlators on many occasions. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>1871, Dominica became part of the Leeward Island Federation. The power of the Black population progressively eroded. </li></ul>
  3. Jean Rhys’ Time <ul><li>1890: Jean Rhys was born. </li></ul><ul><li>1896: 6 years after her birth, the Crown Colony government was re-established. The Black population had their rights massively cut, which resulted in great resentment. Even developmental aid offered as compensation had only minor effect. </li></ul><ul><li>After 1917: In the wake of WWI, there was an increase in interest in politics and political consciousness in the Caribbean. This lead to the formation of the Representative Government Association , which rode on the wave of public resentment and outcry, won a third of the popularly elected seats in the Legislative Assembly in 1924. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>It grew in power and popularity, eventually winning half of the seats in the Legislative Assembly in 1936. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>From shortly after 1936 to 1958, Dominica was governed by the Windward Island Administration, including Martinique, Saint Lucia, Grenada, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, until it joined the West Indies Federation in 1958. </li></ul>
  4. Independence <ul><li>However, the West Indies Federation did not last very long; it dissolved in 1962 and Dominica became an associated state of the United Kingdom in 1967. At that point in time, Dominica formally took responsibility for its internal affairs. </li></ul><ul><li>It was not until November 3, 1978, that the Commonwealth of Dominica was finally granted independence by the United Kingdom, and became a sovereign state. </li></ul>
  5. Post-independence <ul><li>However, its independence only left it as a country with many large and pressing issues originating from centuries of economic underdevelopment, and in mid-1979, political discontent led to the formation of an interim government. </li></ul><ul><li>After the 1980 elections, a government was established, which was led by the Dominica Freedom Party with Prime Minister Eugenia Charles the Caribbean's first female prime minister, taking the helm of Dominica. </li></ul><ul><li>Severe hurricanes also struck Dominica in 1979 and 1980, which further crippled its failing economy and compounded its economic problems. </li></ul><ul><li>1979: Jean Rhys dies. </li></ul>
  6. Present <ul><li>The political climate in Dominica has evolved, with two main parties contending for seats in the Legislative Assembly: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The Edison James United Workers’ Party (UWP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Dominican Labour Party (DLP) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>, with the DLP winning the majority of the seats in the recent 2000 and 2005 elections, winning 12 seats and 52.1% of the vote in 2005. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The current president is Nicholas Liverpool, and the prime minister is now Roosevelt Skerrit, after the death of his predecessor Pierre Charles in 2004. </li></ul><ul><li>Under their leadership, Dominica has achieved a GDP of $4684. </li></ul>
  7. Present <ul><li>Dominica is a parliamentary representative democratic republic. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>As such, the Prime Minister is the head of power (like Singapore) instead of the President (unlike the USA) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>It holds elections every 5 years, where 21 members are elected to the House of Representatives and 9 are appointed by the President. </li></ul>The Crest of Dominica
  8. Acknowledgements <ul><li>Sources </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Background note: Dominica&quot;. U.S. Department of State (July 2008) </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Hurricane claims one life in St. Lucia and possibly two in Dominica&quot;. CBC. 2007-08-17. (Taken from http://www.cbc.bb/content/view/12195/45/) </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Dominica&quot; International Monetary Fund </li></ul><ul><li>www.wikipedia.org </li></ul>
  9. The End <ul><li>Thank you for your attention. </li></ul><ul><li>Any questions? </li></ul>

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