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Future of Ohio Youth Advisory Boards
 

Future of Ohio Youth Advisory Boards

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Presentation shared during the 2010 quarterly meeting of Overcoming Hurdles in Ohio ,Ohio's statewide foster care youth advisory board.

Presentation shared during the 2010 quarterly meeting of Overcoming Hurdles in Ohio ,Ohio's statewide foster care youth advisory board.

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  • Please contact Doris or I if you have any questions, and definitely contact your Fiscal Supervisor or the Bureau of County Finance and Technical Assistance (BCFTA) at 614-752-9194.(PS - $20,000 divided by 9 = $2,222)
  • For logo shirts, will need to use local funds and fund-raising (and if Doris video/Adrian Mario Savio award)Here are some examples of viable investments that can prepare our youth for adulthood and continue to develop their leadership abilities:1. Transportation to/from and supplies for the Northeast Independent Living Summit2. Paying for youth to attend the Purple Project conference (as per my previous email)3. Stipends to reward youth for their participation in certain events4. Paying for youth attendance at the NILA conference in DC: http://www.nilausa.org/ (prepaying the costs of the hotel, flight, and conference registration)5. Transportation to/from the SW or NE FCAA Thanksgiving event this year!
  • Dan Shook has played a huge role in getting this funding approved and allocated. He participated in conference calls and email correspondence with Alex, Doris and I, and is someone for whom I hold great respect. Dan Shook followed up with fiscal coordinators to make sure they were aware of this funding allocation, and have the correct information. He definitely wants the correct information to be shared, and for the funding to benefit your youth.
  • Mahoning: For the purple project I had 8, and the Nila will have 3
  • If you were to ask me to come up with one word to describe Jeremie Brown-Austin, that word would be Potential: The inherent capacity for growth and development.Jeremie is constantly learning new things, and exploring new opportunities. During the 2007 Teen Resource Fair in Stark County, Jeremie performed a rap song, which led to his being chosen to go to Hawaii and share his musical talent in the making of a CD. During his time in Hawaii, Jeremie participated in a statewide rally, advocating for the needs of foster care youth.Jeremie is currently an active member of the Stark County Youth Advisory Board. In this role, he has helped train social workers, and spoken at Malone College’s Foster Forum. Jeremie would like to see Ohio and other states implement consistent aftercare provisions that would continue to support emancipated foster care youth after age 18, throughout young adulthood, helping them to succeed in the adult world.Jeremie’s interests and passions include music, psychology and Theology studies. He can play an impressive game of basketball – in fact, one of Jeremie’s suggestions for mentoring young men in foster care is to participate in sports with youth. He’d also love to see a summer camp for foster care youth, staffed by foster care alumni.Jeremie is known for his creativity and energy. Wherever Jeremie goes, he brings with him a stabilizing faith and a desire to make a positive difference. Regarding his music, for example, Jeremie wants “to bring foster kids together through my music, and make them feel like part of a family.”
  • If you were to ask me to come up with one word to describe Riccardo (“Rico”) Rushin, that word would be Dedication: “The act of binding yourself to to specific course of action.”After graduating from high school, and being publicly honored for his achievements (Duer, Benjamin. Area foster youths honored. Canton Repository, June 23, 2009), Rico remains determined to give back. He has returned to his high school, Glen Oak, several times for motivational speaking engagements, as well as Allen Elementary and Alliance Middle School, Walsch College, Malone College and Mount Vernon College.Currently working toward his degree in social work, Rico has a clear and growing vision of how to improve outcomes for foster care youth, which includes specific guidelines regarding foster parent recruitment and training, mentoring of foster youth and transitional housing.Rico dreams of one day having enough money to open an apartment complex for emancipating foster care youth. Residents will participate in independent living classes with on-site social workers, including Money Management and Study Habits.From his experience in foster care, Rico has learned that people and living situations can be transient – which is why he is determined to be the kind of person that others can rely upon.Rico wants to see youth in foster care paired with at least one mentor that will create a lasting bond, regardless of change in placement – and he wants to be that kind of mentor. He plans to build a family one day and provide structure and stability for his children.
  • Ohio foster y

Future of Ohio Youth Advisory Boards Future of Ohio Youth Advisory Boards Presentation Transcript

  • Investing in the future of Youth Advisory Boards in Ohio
    Ohio YAB,
    July 15, 2010
  • ODJFS funding
    Rule 5101:9-6-39 of the Administrative Code "Youth Advisory Board (YAB) Allocation" is a new allocation that provides funds to county YABs. YABs strengthen and develop the foster care communities in Ohio through the facilitation of ongoing communication, training, and the identification of resources.
    Currently nine counties have established YABs and the allocation will be distributed equally among them:
    Athens,
    Cuyahoga,
    Erie,
    Franklin,
    Hamilton,
    Lorain,
    Mahoning,
    Montgomery, and
    Stark
    $20,000 divided by 9 = $2,222 per county YAB
  • ODJFS funding
    Can be spent on:
    Youth conference attendance (state/national)
    Flight, hotel, and conference fees for NILA
    Supplies
    Youth stipends
    Cannot be spent on:
    Food
    Lobbying
    Shirts with YAB logos:
    OMB Circular A-87 - Cost Principles for State, Local, and Indian Tribal Governments. "Attachment B:”
    e. Unallowable advertising and public relations costs include the following:
    (3) Costs of promotional items and memorabilia, including models, gifts, and souvenirs; and
    (4) Costs of advertising and public relations designed solely to promote the governmental unit.
  • Appreciation for ODJFS
    Generosity
    Availability
    Follow-up
    Investigation
    Clarification
  • ODJFS funding
  • A.C.T.I.O.N. in Athens!
  • Finishing the Journey:Cuyahoga, Lorain,and Mahoning Counties
  • Stark County: 2010 FosterClub All-Star
  • 2010 FosterClubOutstanding Young Leader
    Rico Rushin from Stark County
  • Montgomery County
    Outstanding Young Leader and nominee for Mario Savio Award
  • 2010 Ohio Reach Summit
  • Hamilton County
  • Franklin County
  • Teens2Homes: Judicial Permanency Symposium
    Cuyahoga County