2011 Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps Summer Associate VISTA Impact Reports

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2011 Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps Summer Associate VISTA Impact Reports

  1. 1. Table of ContentsFOOD INSECURITYCASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY – CLARE FAGERHOLM & SHANNON CORLETT 1JOHN CARROLL UNIVERSITY – CATHERINE DISTELRATH & MELISSA BRESNAHAN 3LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE – DOMINIQUE HUGHES 5LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE – GRANT THOMPSON 7LORAIN COUNTY COMMUNITY COLLEGE – NAHTEESHA CHARLES 9MARIETTA COLLEGE – HEATHER STEWART 11MARIETTA COLLEGE – SYDNEY MALTESE 13OBERLIN COLLEGE – RAFE SCOBEY-THAL & ERICA TURETT 15SHAWNEE STATE UNIVERSITY – DANIELLE BOYLES & DOT FLANAGAN 17UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI – KELLEY O’BRIEN & RICK SAMU 19WITTENBERG UNIVERSITY – KATIE MINTER 21
  2. 2. ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Case Western Reserve University The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with ! communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support. !BACKGROUND & HISTORY Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity and hunger VISTA Corps members: Clare Fagerholm & Shannon Corlett FOOD PROGRAM Supervisor: Elizabeth Banks • ewb@case.eduThrough the University Farm Food Program, the Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director:OCC VISTA Corps members assisted with garden Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.orgimplementation, greenhouse and crop maintenance to www.ohiocampuscompact.orgmaximize plant output. They developed an interactivepresentation concerning volunteerism in the United !States, and presented to a group of 11 Mexicanstudents visiting the farm through the ClevelandCouncil on World Affairs. Following thepresentation, the VISTAs assisted the students as theyvolunteered in the fields. The Farm Food Programrecently introduced honey bee hives to maximizeplant pollination and counteract Colony CollapseDisorder, and the students assisted with this projectas well. They also assisted with measuring andrecording compost temperatures for a researchproject, as well as developed presentations regardinghigh tunnels and bee-keeping for visitor education.! The VISTAs harvested strawberries, yellow squash, zucchini, tomatoes, lettuces, herbs, and much more at Cleveland Crops.!FAGERHOLM AT GREEN CORPS:VISTA Corps member Clare was involved with theGreen Corps program through the ClevelandBotanical Gardens, which operates six LearningFarms. Cleveland youth ages 14-18 learn aboutsustainable agriculture as they seed, harvest, and sellproduce to their neighborhoods. She researchedmethods to increase accessibility to the produce bysearching for community partners, identified othergrocery and (continued on reverse) 1
  3. 3. corner stores offering produce, and created a produce pricecomparison chart. Furthermore, Clare developed a binder explainingprogress and useful contacts for future VISTAs to continue to reach !out to the community and spread awareness of the onsite markets inFairfax, Buckeye, and Slavic Village. Groups identified and educatedabout Green Corps programs include: • Buckeye Area Development Organizations • Cleveland Public Library- Rice Branch • MetroHealth Buckeye Health Center • Slavic Village Developmental • Cleveland Public Library- Slavic Village • Fairfax Renaissance Development Corporation • Senior Outreach Services • Emmanuel Baptist Church • Karamu House • Woodland Learning CenterCORLETT AT CLEVELAND CROPS:Through the Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities,VISTA Corps member Shannon has been involved with the planting,harvesting, and marketing of local, chemical free produce. At the Fagerholm and Corlett displayingStanard location where she spent most of her time this operation freshly harvested strawberries atemploys three job coaches (including the farm manager), fourteen Cleveland Cropsindividuals with disabilities (the “consumers”) and the VISTAs.Because this was only the second season the program had been inexistence there were many unique individual and group challenges toface. Shannon’s challenge centered around the development of a About Ohio Campus Compactmarketing department which could effectively harvest, store, and sell AmeriCorps*VISTAall of the produce which was coming out of the farm without anywaste of time or product. This also involved finding a balance Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide nonprofitbetween sales to prominent Cleveland restaurants while still being coalition of colleges and university presidents andable to maintain availability to the community. their campuses working to promote the civic purposes of higher education. Ohio CampusDuring the marketing process Shannon developed an easy to Compact provides resources, services &understand system of organization which allows both the leaders and partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen theirthe consumers to understand the harvesting and sorting process, and ability to educate students for civic and socialwill next be working on creating a list of all of the names of products responsibility and to improve community life.on the property to help the workers be able to accurately spell eachof the vegetables names. In addition to exploring this process, she AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service program designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded ashas also formed relationships with several leading chefs in the area Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 andwho now recognize that she is a legitimate and reliable contact for incorporated into the AmeriCorps network ofproduce on a daily basis. Even the more interested neighbors now programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the frontattend the newly introduced farmer’s market that she manages each lines in the fight against poverty in America forweek, and are starting to accept the program into the area instead of more than 40 years.rebelling against the farm’s establishment. Shannon’s time as a VISTAhas been spent gaining extensive knowledge about horticulture and The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*the daily chores of a chemical free farm, as well as getting to know VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs whothe entire community which currently benefits from the programs create and expand programs designed to bringexistence. Her hope is to be able to continue colunteering time to individuals and communities out of poverty. VISTAsthis cause and its people in the future as they look towards serve in the poorest areas of their communities tocontinued expansion and growth. tackle poverty-related problems such as hunger and homelessness, financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at: www.ohiocampuscompact.org 2
  4. 4. 1 ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: John Carroll University The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support. ! HISTORY & BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity and hunger Northeast Ohio (specifically the Cleveland VISTA Corps members: Catherine Distelrath & Melissa area) has a reputation of being one of the Bresnahan poorer, more dangerous cities in Ohio. At the Site Supervisor: Margaret Finucane same time, however, Cleveland boasts a larger (216) 397-4698 • mfinucane@jcu.edu number of community gardens than any other Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director: city in Ohio. The city of Cleveland and its Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org www.ohiocampuscompact.org surrounding areas are making progress. Clevelanders are working tirelessly to ensure ! that fewer people are living in a food insecure situation every day and that more people have access to healthy, fresh food on a regular basis. ! This summer, the OCC Summer Associate VISTA Corps members, Catherine and Melissa, have joined the community garden initiative in Cleveland in some important ways. First, by maintaining the Carroll Community Garden on ! campus at John Carroll University and donating all of its produce to the Heights Emergency Food Center; second, by partnering with Asian Services In Action (ASIA) on its community garden and outreach efforts; third, by researching various ways to make it easier for people to develop and maintain community gardens, and researching ways to get healthier foods into the lunch programs at Cleveland schools. ! COMMUNITY IMPACT There are 150 schools in the Cleveland Metropolitan School district, most of which are responsible for providing Cleveland’s youth with 1-2 meals a day. That means many Cleveland schools are responsible for about 75% of lunches that a child eats per year. However, much of the food that is served in area schools is processed, preserved, imported food that is not healthy for students. 3
  5. 5. 2 ! Dietary and grocery habits in the community also model after a ! system where imported foods dominate over local products and preservatives are common. As a result, efforts to better the system ! as well as the health of the individuals who live inside it are being made all over Cleveland. Examples of some of these groups and individuals include Rich Hoban with the Cuyahoga County Board of Developmental Disabilities, Asian Services In Action (ASIA), the Heights emergency food center, and certain government workers who coordinate with such groups. This summer we worked with and learned from these various groups. Primarily, however, we worked to create a resource manual for community partners that can help such organizations in their efforts to continue working toward a greener and healthier Cleveland by incorporating important information we learned from various groups and research. The goal of this manual is to make it ! easier for people to create a healthier food system in Cleveland ! schools and to help individuals understand the various reasons gardening is useful and important. CAMPUS IMPACT The Center for Service and Social Action at John Carroll University About Ohio Campus Compact has partnered with the Heights Emergency Food Center (HEFC) for AmeriCorps*VISTA several years. However, in the past few years, the partnership has Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide nonprofit suffered a bit due to various circumstances, such as scheduling coalition of colleges and university presidents and their difficulties. Because of the VISTA efforts with the community garden campuses working to promote the civic purposes of in the past two years, the relationship between HEFC and John higher education. Ohio Campus Compact provides Carroll has improved to the point of creating a more viable option resources, services & partnerships to help Ohio for sending student volunteers to HEFC. campuses deepen their ability to educate students for The VISTA members have also worked to include more John Carroll civic and social responsibility and to improve community students in the gardening process. Recruiting student volunteers life. during the summer is more difficult as many students vacate campus AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service program during the summer months. However, by making a fun event out of designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded as our planting day, as opposed to simply planting the garden Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 and themselves, the VISTA members were able to recruit student incorporated into the AmeriCorps network of volunteers who would be available and willing to help throughout programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the front lines in the summer. Including more students throughout the summer the fight against poverty in America for more than 40 should encourage more students to get involved and learn more years. about the garden when they return to campus in the fall. The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs who create and expand programs designed to bring individuals and OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE: communities out of poverty. VISTAs serve in the The VISTA-created manual includes information about why poorest areas of their communities to tackle poverty- gardening is healthier for the environment. It also includes related problems such as hunger and homelessness, information on how to integrate a more sustainable and local food financial literacy, veteran student services, public health system into schools. In addition to the community manual, Catherine and college access. More information at: has also comprised a garden manual for John Carroll’s Community www.ohiocampuscompact.org garden. The resources can be utilized by any of the 60 community partners that work with the Center for Service and Social Action and can also be utilized within John Carroll to further efforts toward a more local and sustainable city. ! 4
  6. 6. !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report: ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! Lorain County Community College ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! !in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards; campuses expand their civic outreach; ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! ! and community partners receive critical support. ! ! ! ! ! HISTORY & BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity ! In Elyria OH, 23 percent of families with children less than 18 VISTA Corps member: Dominique Hughes years of age live in poverty. The poverty rate more than Site Supervisor: Marcia Jones ! doubles to 47.8 percent in families with a female head of (440) 366-4729 • mjones@lorainccc.edu household and children under the age of 18. This summer in Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director: ! close partnership with Lorain County Community College’s Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • (LCCC) Campus Gardens, Elyria City Schools (Northwood lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org Middle School), and Giant Eagle the Lorain County Urban ! www.ohiocampuscompact.org League (LCUL) was able to combat food insecurities associated with poverty. ! Summer Associate VISTA Corps member Dominique Hughes, ! ! with the help of Project Ready Director, Tina Allen, and Project Ready volunteer, Cassandra Allen, coordinated 58 hours of ! direct and indirect service learning for 6-9th grade students whom are in the LCUL’s Project Ready Summer Camp. July 25th through August 12th was dedicated to informing 16 local ! youth about job creation for the next generation, food access, hunger, healthy eating and living. ! COMMUNITY IMPACT ! Project Ready youth were introduced to issues of food insecurity through a poverty simulation. Those who were ! unable to afford a plentiful amount of food during the simulation identified food banks/pantries, food stamps, and ! schools lunch programs as their options. It was essential to review the importance of food assistance for its relevance to ! our community service. Project Ready youth were one hundred times more connected to their service than they ! would have been if they had not participated in a poverty Project Ready student Nancy Tanner and ! simulation. It reminded everyone how important their Dominique Hughes helped pull weeds in commitment to civic engagement would be for the next three the Green-Land Youth Experience weeks. Garden. Project Ready youth devoted Service learning programs involve students in organized 20 hours of direct service learning to community service that addresses the local needs of community campus gardens renovations. partners, while developing academic skills and instilling the importance of civic responsibility. 5
  7. 7. On average twelve students in Project Ready participated in service learning at "#$!%&"(!&)*(+"!LCCC Campus Gardens and Northwood Middle School Courtyard Garden. Thebenefits of service learning include: ,-!.#$!/012$345!! ! • Experience real-life application of classroom knowledge. +67689::-!$/;9;$<!-=0.#5!>?! • Develop enhanced problem solving skills, ability to work in teams, and planning abilities. $3768$!@$93/6/;!*93./$345!A! • Early college access and career exploration • Improved self-esteem and self- satisfaction • Enhance civic engagement attitudes, skill and behaviors. *3=B$8.!C$9<-!+=::92=39.6=/45!?!Project Ready’s service learning component has offered opportunities to youth, D6$:<!"36E45!F!!which keep them actively engaged in agency and leadership. By providing themwith resources that support the development of self-advocacy skills, Project "=.9:!#=034!=G!4$3768$!E$3!4.0<$/.5!HF!Ready staff and community partners are ensuring that the next generation willbe equipped to turn their ideas into action. Furthermore, service learning "=.9:!#=034!=G!4$3768$!:$93/6/;5!IJF!empowers and shows them that they have a voice in their community.Youth were also able to visit Giant Eagle to better familiarize themselves with +=110/6.-!K/;9;$1$/.L5!M>ANJOHP>J!healthy lifestyles. Project Ready discussed the specifics of the food pyramid,organic and inorganic foods. A tour of Giant Eagle, food samples and L>!#=03!Q!M>FPHR!ST#6=!%9:0$!=G!worksheets encouraged youth to make healthy food choices in the future. %=:0/.$$3U!&/<$E$/<$/.!$8.=3V!CAMPUS IMPACT !The Lorain County Urban League Project Ready’s partnership with LorainCounty Community College was a huge success. Through the assistance ofSummer Associate VISTA Corps member Grant Thompson and Professor RubyBeil Project Ready youth were able to participate in approximately 20 hours About Ohio Campus Compactrenovating LCCC’s Campus Field House Garden. Renovations consisted of AmeriCorps*VISTAyouth researching plants, transplanting plants from the Hummingbird ButterflyHabitat Garden, redesigning the layout of Field House Garden, renaming Field Ohio Campus compact is a statewideHouse Garden to The Urban League Project Ready Green-land Youth Experience nonprofit coalition of colleges and universityGarden, and designing a sign in the Fab Lab (offers tools needed to conceptualize, presidents and their campuses working todesign, develop, fabricate and test a wide variety of things). promote the civic purposes of higher education. Ohio Campus Compact providesThe Urban League Project Ready Green-land Youth Experience Garden’s tranquility resources, services & partnerships to helpprovides the perfect study break and has the possibility to be sustainable with Ohio campuses deepen their ability to educatefuture assistance from volunteers. Not only were youth able to learn about the students for civic and social responsibility andimportance of civic engagement, they were able to learn about food access, to improve community life.medicinal herbs, and the basics of gardening. LCCC and LCUL’s summerpartnership has been a win-win situation achieving desired results for both the AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national servicecampus and community. program designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded as Volunteers in Service to AmericaCHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE in 1965 and incorporated into the AmeriCorps network of programs in 1993,The Lorain County Urban League’s Project Ready’s first summer was able to be VISTA has been on the front lines in the fightsuccessful through the help of community partners, staff, parents and youth. against poverty in America for more than 40Challenges included transportation, and organizing service learning hours. The years.Project Ready Summer Program has the potential to double in numbers by nextsummer with the support of Elyria City Schools, Lorain County Community The Ohio Campus CompactCollege, Oberlin College Bonner Center for Service and Learning, REACHigher, AmeriCorps*VISTA Program places andGear Up, Ninde Scholars and NASA (National Aeronautics and Space supports VISTAs who create and expandAdministration). These formalized partnerships coupled with agency programs designed to bring individuals andcollaborations, and programming experience will only enhance Lorain County’s communities out of poverty. VISTAs serve instudents’ civic engagement in the future. the poorest areas of their communities to tackle poverty-related problems such as hunger and homelessness, financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at www.ohiocampuscompact.org. 6
  8. 8. !"#$#%"#&$()*+,+&%"&+,-.%,&/0&/1,&0((*"%/23& 41%0&5$()*+&50()$/&6789:&7()$/&;,)0-/&<=>>?&& @0-$%"&50*"/2&50((*"%/2&50AA,#,&&!"#$%"&$()*+,-$(*+)./$0*#1&(1+-2345!0$+161)*$-/1)/#6&.)778$.99#./-$.77#6#$1#-,1.#-$:&/"$ .**,9&/&#-$&9$9##;<$(1+-$*#*=#1-$6)&9$>)7,)=7#$#?+#1&#9.#$)9;$#;,.)/&9)7$):)1;-@$()*+,-#-$ #?+)9;$/"#&1$.&>&.$,/1#)."@$)9;$.**,9&/8$+)1/9#1-$1#.#&>#$.1&/&.)7$-,++1/<&&& HISTORY & BACKGROUND & Lorain County Community College (LCCC) is located in Elyria, Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food Insecurity Ohio, a community located on the western edge of the VISTA Corps member: Grant Thompson Cleveland metropolitan area. Within a seven mile radius of Site Supervisor: Michele Henes LCCC, there are seven areas classified as food deserts by (440) 366-7034 • mhenes@lccc.edu the U.S. Department of Agriculture Economic Research Ohio Campus Compace VISTA Sr. Program Director: Service. This service defines food deserts as low income Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org communities in which 500 people, or 33% of the population, www.ohiocampuscompact.org live more than 1 mile from a grocery store. 25,124 total people live in these food deserts, 20,413 of which (81.2%) are considered to have low- access to food. (http://www.ers.usda.gov/data/fooddesert/)& Being the most affordable option for education in Lorain County, Lorain County Community College serves many students and families from low socio-economic backgrounds. The Children’s Learning Center is a non-profit child-care and pre-school service provided to staff, faculty, and students of LCCC. Given economic and food access issues in the community, many of the children served by the center possess little knowledge about where food comes from. Because of this, the center’s director, Michele Henes, has been working in conjunction with Filtrexx GardenSoxx to implement a pilot gardening curriculum called, “A Garden for Every Child.” One of the main goals of this curriculum states that: “Gardens with edible crops can foster the development of positive nutritional attitudes and behaviors. Kids learn the sources of their food and are motivated to try new fruits and vegetables.”& In 2010, Henes secured a Youth Garden Grant from the LCCC Children’s Learning Center Students were given National Gardening Association in order to expand and care hands-on gardening experience. Not only did they for a student garden at the Learning center. get to witness the growth process of their plants,& they had the opportunity to actively participate in “It became incredibly concerning to me that, when asked this process, from planting the seeds, to providing where their vegetables come from, a large percentage of our the plants with water, and keeping track of the students would respond: ‘McDonald’s’” garden’s progress. - Michele Henes (Above: OCC VISTA Grant Thompson and Learning Center Students Director, Children’s Learning Center plant pumpkins that the students started from seed.)&&&& 7
  9. 9. !CAMPUS IMPACT !Sowing the seeds of knowledge !In the second summer of the curriculum’s implementation, OCC VISTA Grant !Thompson worked to expand the existing vegetable garden, worked in ! !conjunction with center teachers to provide experiential reinforcement of Learning Through Doing:learning material, and promoted garden growth so that students could witnessfood production. The overall goal was to establish the idea of gardens as a In addition to learning about gardening andnutritional food source at a young age. food sourcing, students received an informal education in sustainable agricultural practicesThe vegetable garden itself was expanded by more than 150 square feet and through the use of collected rain water,four raised bed gardens (each 3’x3’) were added. In order to foster meaningful worm-composting food scraps, and a 100%connections to learning material, the garden was divided into seven distinct organically raised garden.sections, each devoted to a type of food children would be familiar with. Theseincluded: Salsa, Pizza, Salad, Dinner and Herb sections. Additionally a “three (Below: Students collect rain water from thesisters garden” and three pumpkin patches were established in the raised beds. rain-barrel to use in the garden)The students started majority of the plants from seed and transplanted them tothe garden in the summer. Throughout the summer, the students were given an !increasing amount of responsibility over age-appropriate tasks in the garden !(i.e. watering, weeding, growth tracking, etc.). They were also given the !opportunity to learn through exploration in the garden on a daily basis. Students !were also tasked with caring for a worm composting bin to supplement what ! !they learned about composting. The students had the opportunity to harvest !both basil and dill from their garden before the end of summer and the fall !students will be able to harvest a large amount of various vegetables. The basil !was utilized by the grade-school students, who made pesto from the basil that !they picked for lunch. ! ! !Growing Partnerships: !Through the center’s partnership with the local company, Filtrexx, the garden !was primarily comprised of GardenSoxx. These are self-contained growing !systems that can be moved from year-to-year and utilize locally-sourced, !USDA organic compost as a growing media. Filtrexx has also been !instrumental in the creation of the gardening curriculum utilized by the !Children’s learning Center. ! About Ohio Campus CompactFor the second consecutive year Eric Petrus, LCCC’s Executive Chef, has AmeriCorps*VISTAdonated his time to create food for the students from the center’s garden. Thisis an incredibly important part of the process because it shows the students a Ohio Campus compact is a statewide nonprofitdirect connection between the garden and their plate. This summer the dill coalition of colleges and university presidents andfrom the garden was utilized by Petrus and his team to teach the students how their campuses working to promote the civicto make a dill vegetable dip as a snack. This partnership will be utilized going purposes of higher education. Ohio Campusforward into the fall in order to reinforce the idea of gardens as a food source. Compact provides resources, services & partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen their ability to educate students for civic and socialOPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE: responsibility and to improve community life.As the LCCC Children’s Learning Center Garden continues to grow, there arealmost limitless opportunities to educate children and their parents alike about AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service program designed specifically to fight poverty.both gardening and food sourcing. Future projects could include an expansion of Founded as Volunteers in Service to America inthe children’s garden to a full-fledged community garden, giving parents who may 1965 and incorporated into the AmeriCorpsnot otherwise have the opportunity, the chance to share the gardening network of programs in 1993, VISTA has been onexperience with their children the front lines in the fight against poverty in America for more than 40 years.The center can also begin to utilize its student teachers to enhance thecurrent curriculum and to write more specific unit and lesson plans for future The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTAuse. As one of the first programs of this type, the center is in prime position Program places and supports VISTAs who createto receive grants and funding to further the work that has already been done. and expand programs designed to bring individuals and communities out of poverty. VISTAs serve in the poorest areas of their communities to tackle poverty-related problems such as hunger and homelessness, financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at www.ohiocampuscompact.org. 8
  10. 10. ! Engaging in campuses services for the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Lorain County Community CollegeThe Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communitiesin need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards; campuses expand their civic outreach; and community partners receive critical support. HISTORY & BACKGROUND In Elyria, Ohio, many organizations and programs that were focused Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity on educating and youth leadership development have been severely VISTA Corps Member: Nahteesha Charles impacted by federal, state and local budget cuts. Some successful Site Supervisor: Marcia Jones local youth programs like Jogs, Gear Up, and CORE were forced to (440) 366-4729 • mjones@lorainccc.edu close down. This has left a huge gap in services for at-risk Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Director: populations and for untold numbers of children who rely on free or Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org reduced-price lunches during the school year and face hunger during www.ohiocampuscompact.org the summer months. Ohio Campus Compact and Lorain County Community College worked together to place a Summer Associate VISTA Corps member with Save Our Children, a faith-based nonprofit organization in Elyria which provides enriching summer programs for youth from first grade through high school. VISTA Summer Associate Nahteesha Charles helped the Save Our Children staff to develop curriculum and provide education to all the teens in the Teen Youth Council and in the 1st and 2nd class. Focusing primarily on nutrition education, Nahteesha and her students explored the cultural , religious and historic importance of certain foods. The small garden plot and partnerships with the locally-grown produce cooperative, City Fresh, ! provided interesting—and delicious—tools to teach the youth about healthy eating and food production. Teen Youth Council reading books to the COMMUNITY IMPACT 1st and 2nd graders at Save Our Children Thanks in part to the work of the VISTA Summer Associate program, Save Our Children was able to provide exciting, engaging ! and life-changing programs to Elyria children. The summer program offered important life lessons about respect for themselves and others, empowerment, culture and domestic violence. Teen Youth Council provided a service-learning experience for the participants who learned about respect, empowerment, team work, leadership, equality, and people skills. Field trips to Cleveland-area colleges enabled teens to better understand and explore possible options for college and various career paths. The dynamic summer programming led by Nahteesha Charles also engaged the youth in direct service to the community. For example, the teens volunteered at the Salvation AmeriCorps VISTA member Nahteesha Charles Army to bag free grocery for low income families. The experience teaches 1st and 2nd graders about food and sparked deeper conversations among the group as to the various nutrition in the Save Our Children vegetable economic and social challenges their neighborhoods face, and an (continued on reverse) garden ! 9
  11. 11. exploration as to how they believe the community can be made a The VISTA IMPACTbetter place to live. ! By the numbers:The students completed a total of 10-12 hours of community service !over the course of the eight week program. The group also worked Engaged youth: 10with the Boys and Girls Club and was able to use their recordingstudio to record a teen talk show to discuss what they learned that ! Service Learning Partners: 5week. The teens discussed healthy versus unhealthy relationships,what it means to empower, how to work together, why it is !!important to have a goal and how to start it, what to do to follow Field Trips: 5through with it and the importance of education. !! Total number of service hours perAt the conclusion of the eight-week summer program, led by Ohio student: 10-12 !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!Campus Compact Summer Associate VISTA Nahteesha Charles atSave Our Children, the Teen Youth Council outlined the followingachievements: About Ohio Campus Compact • Learned how to create goals and how to follow through AmeriCorps*VISTA • Learned how to work in harmony with their team • Explored Cleveland State University and the opportunities Ohio Campus compact is a statewide nonprofit higher education offers coalition of colleges and university presidents and • Developed philanthropic skills and learned about importance their campuses working to promote the civic purposes of higher education. Ohio Campus of giving, volunteering and helping the less unfortunate. Compact provides resources, services & • Improved behavior and respect for self and others partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen their • Improved problem-solving skills ability to educate students for civic and social • Experience teaching and reading to 1st and 2nd (reading responsibility and to improve community life. buddies) • Increased awareness of community needs and challenges AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service program designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded as Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 andCHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE incorporated into the AmeriCorps network ofSave Our Children received positive feedback about the project over programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the frontthe eight weeks. The greatest challenges to the program were lines in the fight against poverty in America forcoordinating transportation and communicating with many different more than 40 years.organizations. They are many opportunities to continue partnerships The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTAwith organizations like Boys and Girls Scout, Boys and Girls Club, Program places and supports VISTAs who createSalvation Army, and City Fresh, however. Opportunities for future and expand programs designed to bring individualsgrowth will depend continued VISTA involvement or additional and communities out of poverty. VISTAs serve inoutside funding to enable increased outreach to the community in the poorest areas of their communities to tackleorder to enroll larger numbers of participants and to coordinate poverty-related problems such as hunger andadditional fieldtrips, an important component to the program. homelessness, financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at www.ohiocampuscompact.org. 10
  12. 12. Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Marietta College The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support.HISTORY AND BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity VISTA Corps member: Heather StewartMarietta College is located in Ohio’s southeast Appalachian Site Supervisor: Arielle Jenningsregion in Washington County. The area has continued to 740-376-4561 • aj002@marietta.edu!fight the battle against poverty since the downfall of the Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director: Leshamanufacturing industry that was once booming on the river. Farias • (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.orgAccording to the U.S. Census Bureau, 14.7% of Washington www.ohiocampuscompact.orgCounty residents lived at or below the poverty level in 2009,and the rate of unemployment was up to 8.5% in April of2010. In addition to the high poverty and unemploymentrates, 14.7% of people in Washington County are consideredto be food insecure, meaning they struggle to put food onthe table for all three meals every day. Children are oftenthe ones most affected by these debilitating statistics, andMorgan County, Washington’s neighbor has seen evenworse conditions.Washington-Morgan Community Action (WMCAP) is a non-profit community based organization that serves bothWashington and Morgan Counties. For over 40 yearsWMCAP has been carrying out its commitment to help low-income individuals and families achieve growth and successthrough over 60 programs and a dedicated staff. Whatbegan as the first family planning program in the state ofOhio has grown to include programs ranging from healthcare Cindy Styer teaches the kids the importanceto delivery of meals and is a major employer and service of milk and dairy products in their diet.provider to the local communities. After their second nutrition lesson they learned how to follow a recipe to makeCOMMUNITY IMPACT vanilla ice cream, the perfect ending to one of the hottest days of the summer. CindyIn 2009 Marietta College and Ohio Campus Compact plans on returning to the site next year tocreated an AmeriCorps VISTA position thru Washington host more classes.Morgan Community Action. This year the OCC VISTA wasresponsible for creating a marketing plan to generate moreactivity at the Senior Nutrition Program congregational site Pictured: Brian, Kaile, Arabella and Anthonyin Marietta as well as hosting the Summer Feeding Site inNew Matamoras, Washington County. The New Matamorasunemployment rate was at 8.1% in March 2011 (continuedon reverse) 11
  13. 13. and 23.1% of the community was living at or below the The VISTA Impactpoverty level in 2009 so providing a hot and nutritious meal by the numbers:to the children in the area can do a lot to alleviate thetroubles some parents face over summer while their ! Summer Feeding New Matamoraschildren are not in school. The two unique views of food Meal Totals 2010-2011insecurity provide insight to the core struggles manycommunity members face every day. 308!COMMUNITY IMPACT 267! Meals Ordered 2010!The Summer Feeding site in New Matamoras provided over300 hot and nutritious meals to local children this summer, Meals Ordered 2011!fewer meals were leftover and less food was left untouched.The children learned the importance of recycling the firsttwo weeks of the program with the start of a recyclingprogram to reduce waste. Cindy Styer from Ohio Stateextension program visited the site twice to teach the kidsabout the importance of fruits and vegetables where thekids received bracelets to keep track of their daily servings 31!and then about milk and dairy products where the children 20! 7! 3!made ice cream from scratch. Hot Meals! Cold Meals! Leftover Meals!After a survey of the attendees at the Senior Nutritioncongregate site in Marietta it was clear to see what were thedriving factors that kept up the attendance. While the food !received high ratings from those surveyed most inattendance said they come in every day to spend time with About Ohio Campus Compacttheir friends. As a result, the marketing plan, with the goal AmeriCorps*VISTAof increasing meals served, focuses on the relationshipsattendees have with the community. The CABEL bus line, Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide nonprofitran through Washington Morgan Community Action, will coalition of colleges and university presidents and theirsupport advertisements for the Senior Nutrition Program campuses working to promote the civic purposes ofand information about the program will be available at other higher education. Ohio Campus Compact provideslocations and programs current site attendees visit. resources, services & partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen their ability to educate students for civic and social responsibility and to improve communityCHALLENGES & OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE life.The Summer Feeding Site faces many challenges every year. AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service programThe biggest concern is that funding may not be available to designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded assupport the program in the future. However, the Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 andcommunity knows the importance of the program to those incorporated into the AmeriCorps network ofit serves so there is hope that those at Washington Morgan programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the front lines inCommunity Action will find the funds. Towards the end of the fight against poverty in America for more than 40the program many children began to invite their friends to years.lunch, significantly increasing the number of meals served sothere is an opportunity to grow with this concept when The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps* VISTAmarketing the program next year. Continuing the recycling Program places and supports VISTAs who create andprogram and possibly starting a composting program with expand programs designed to bring individuals andthe community garden for next year will increase awareness communities out of poverty. VISTAs serve in theof the program in the local community. poorest areas of their communities to tackle poverty- related problems such as hunger and homelessness,The Senior Nutrition Program is facing low attendance at financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at:the Marietta congregate site but with the new marketing www.ohiocampuscompact.orgplan many of their concerns will be lessened, giving themmore time to focus on improving the quality of the mealsserved. 12
  14. 14. Engaging campuses in service to the community Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Marietta College! The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support. !HISTORY AND BACKGROUNDThe city of Marietta, located in Ohio’s southeast Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurityAppalachian region, struggles with poverty related VISTA Corps member: Sydney Malteseissues despite its historic appeal. According to the U.S. Site Supervisor: Arielle JenningsCensus Bureau, 16.9% of Washington County residents 740-376-4561 • aj002@marietta.edulived at or below the poverty level in 2008. Food Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director:insecurity affects14.7% of people in Washington Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.orgCounty, meaning 14.7% of the population struggles to www.ohiocampuscompact.orgput food on the table for all three meals. As reported !by the Marietta Community Food Pantry, 7,665Marietta-based clients were served in 2010 and 3,421 !clients have already been served this year (as of June30th, 2011). In addition, 73% of Washington County’slow-income eligible students participated in a free orreduced-price school lunch program, but only 14.3% ofeligible students participated in summer meal programs,according to the Children’s Hunger AllianceWashington County report. !In order to increase the number of eligible studentsbenefitting from summer meal programs, Ohio CampusCompact and Marietta College created an AmeriCorpsVISTA Summer Associate position in 2010 tocollaborate with the Summer Food Service Program at Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps VISTA Summerthe Ely Chapman Education Foundation in Marietta. Associate Sydney Maltese (far left) instructs the junior highSummer Food Service Programs provide children with class at Ely Chapman in how to make nutritious snacks.free meals during the summer months, when they do Below, the class poses for a smile and a taste-test.not have access to the free or reduced-price mealprograms that they normally receive during the schoolyear. The Ely Chapman Education Foundation, a non-profit organization that serves to enrich the lives ofMarietta youth through education, acts as a host site forthe Summer Food Service Program. Ely Chapmanprovides the venue for children from area summercamps and the community to come in and receive a freemeal. One of the primary goals of this program is torelieve some of the burden on Marietta area foodpantries and free meal kitchens. “This year we’ve hadmore [children] than previous years simply because ofL&P Services and Eve, Inc. taking advantage of the freelunch,” (continued on reverse) 13
  15. 15. reports Alice Chapman, chair and founder of Ely Chapman. “This isimportant because the Washington County Children’s Services PreventionUnit was terminated two years ago due to funding cuts, and they often broughtfinancially ‘at-risk’ clients to lunch.” The VISTA ImpactCOMMUNITY IMPACT by the numbers:During the summer of 2011, Ely Chapman collaborated with AmeriCorpsSummer Associate Sydney Maltese to bring their Summer Food ServiceProgram to its fullest potential. Sydney worked with the staff of Ely 424 Free breakfasts served in JuneChapman to track the number of children receiving meals, chart theamounts of milk waste and food waste during mealtimes, and to preparebreakfast, lunch, and snack for the children. Additionally, Sydney also 335 Free breakfasts served in Julyhelped plan and coordinate a Nutrition Week at Ely Chapman, as well asweekly, hands-on healthy snack lessons with the junior high class. During 2,369 Free lunches served in Junethe course of her service, Sydney also worked to advertise the SummerFood Service Program at area food pantries, and obtained donations of 2,049 Free lunches served in Julyfresh produce to serve to all of the children attending the free meals. Incollaboration with the staff of Ely Chapman, Sydney also made smallrevisions to the breakfast and lunch menus in order to cater moretoward the children’s needs. 29% Decrease in the amount of milkNutrition Week wasted from beginning of program to endThe pinnacle of Sydney Maltese’s collaboration with Ely Chapman wasNutrition Week, which was organized for all of the students in Ely 29% Decrease in number of mealsChapman’s Sensational Summer Camp, and all of the students in the wasted from beginning of program to endMarietta Family YMCA’s Camp WILD. Highlights of the week includetaste-testing a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables, learning about MyPlate as a food group visual, and making homemade applesauce andstrawberry-banana soymilk smoothies. One of the primary goals of !Nutrition Week was to allow the students to form a relationship withhealthy food, beginning with an introduction to fresh produce “from seedto table.” Presenters from the OSU Extension Agency and the Food 4 About Ohio Campus CompactLess Community Gardens contributed to the activities. AmeriCorps*VISTACAMPUS IMPACT Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide nonprofitBy stationing an AmeriCorps Summer Associate at Ely Chapman coalition of colleges and university presidents andEducation Foundation, Marietta College continues to foster and build their campuses working to promote the civicupon an undeniably strong relationship with nonprofit organizations in purposes of higher education. Ohio Campusthe surrounding community. Already, the College provides Ely Chapman Compact provides resources, services &with a number of work study positions and student volunteers who partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen theirprovide both assistance and resources to the many programs at the ability to educate students for civic and socialfoundation. Furthermore, Marietta College students who are involved at responsibility and to improve community life.Ely Chapman gain an invaluable inside understanding of the way in which AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service programa nonprofit organization functions, and are able to contribute designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded assubstantially to their community as a result. Because of the positive Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 andimpact of the work of Marietta College students at Ely Chapman, incorporated into the AmeriCorps network ofincluding the work of AmeriCorps*VISTAs, the College intends to programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the frontcontinue building upon its relationship with the nonprofit in the future. lines in the fight against poverty in America for more than 40 years.KEEPING THE PARTNERSHIP STRONG: OPPORTUNITIES FOR The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps* VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs whoTHE FUTURE create and expand programs designed to bringEly Chapman’s Summer Food Service Program, while successful, still has individuals and communities out of poverty. VISTAsplenty of room to grow. Previous AmeriCorps Summer Associates have serve in the poorest areas of their communities tolaid the groundwork for the Foundation to begin collaborating with the tackle poverty-related problems such as hunger andCollege to start a gardening and compost program, budgeting for homelessness, financial literacy, veteran studenthealthier snack-making, and revising the camp menu to include more services, public health and college access. Morefresh, natural food. The goal of sustainability will provide an exciting and information at: www.ohiocampuscompact.orginteresting challenge for the program in the future. 14
  16. 16. ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Oberlin College The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support. ! HISTORY & BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity and education Northeast Ohio and Lorain County have been VISTA Corps members: Rafe Scobey-Thal & Erica Turett epicenters to food inequality and insecurity. With Site Supervisor: Dr. Beth Blissman • beth.blissman@oberlin.edu almost 30% of families qualifying as low-income, Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director: Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org families’ abilities to eat is already in question let alone www.ohiocampuscompact.org to eat healthily, locally and responsibly. OCC ! AmeriCorps Summer Associate VISTA members ! Erica Turett and Rafe Scobey-Thal, two Oberlin College students, under the guidance of Sandy Jordan and the New Agrarian Center planned and ran the third year of the George Jones Discovery Camp. A week long camp centered around educating and engaging disadvantaged youth in sustainable agriculture, healthy eating habits and experiencing nature. In it’s third year the camp was at a turning point in its identity and how the New Agrarian Center, the overseeing organization, wanted it to impact the community. Turett and Scobey-Thal were brought on to coordinate outreach to a larger group of children and to restructure it to be more of a foundational food and nature experience; the camp is meant to literally allow children to ‘discover’ the principles behind eating, cooking and farming. Left-Right: Ja’mel Currie, Sky Barlow, Shane Henderson, Erica “Wow! I never knew this is what a squash plant looked Turett, Heaven Harrington, Lydia Lee-Mosley; Top: Rafe Scobel- like. Why don’t the supermarket’s vegetables look and Thal taste like this?” HEAVEN HARRINGTON-AGE 10, ELYRIA, OHIO COMMUNITY IMPACT Counselors Rafe-Scobey-Thal and Erica Turett on the George Jones Memorial Farm with campers and a The George Jones Discovery Camp, organized through the George Jones Farm and the New counselor (far right) from Save Our Children in Elyria, Ohio. Several sessions of a week long camp Agrarian Center involved a total of 30 campers in the bring city kids and local food together as the campers course of three consecutive weeks. Coming from all areas of Lorain County, camp attendees included a are given the chance for hands-on work in learning where food comes from. Partnership with the farm mix of rural and urban campers that ranged from the ages of 7-12. Many of the campers were members of allows the campers their very own food garden that the Oberlin (continued on reverse) they learn to create and take care of. 15
  17. 17. community who came to the camp individually and 17 campers came with either The Boys and Girls Club of Oberlin or a Left-Right: program called Save Our Children, located 20 minutes away in Campers Elyria. Scholarship money was provided for any student whose Ja’mel Currie family wanted or needed it in any quantity necessary. Rafe and Shane Scobey-Thal and Erica Turett were the counselors who ran the Henderson camp. They intended for the camp to cater to all ages and levels make of knowledge about farming, nature, and arts and crafts. Among ‘Memory many things, the campers learned how to plant seedlings and Keepers’ beans, how to effectively water plants, how to weed and with yarn complete general maintenance on a garden, to identify trees and and sticks in leaves and edible berries, to practice art using only sticks and the farm’s yarn and make acorn mobiles. They learned about the way food Straw-Bale in this country is grown (on large, non-organic, non-local farms) Building! and why these methods are not healthy and not environmentally sustainable. They learned about the things that make a farm healthy and desirable and that all people deserve to eat in that! way. Most importantly, the campers learned where in their communities these opportunities were available. About Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA As a result of Farm and Discovery Camp, the children were able to experience farm work, walks in the woods, farm animals, Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide fresh, local, organic food, interactions with farmers, the growth nonprofit coalition of colleges and university of their own vegetable garden and tending to it each day. Many of presidents and their campuses working to the campers at Discovery Camp had not previously been on a promote the civic purposes of higher farm or walked in the woods. The camp, as it is in its early years, education. Ohio Campus Compact was a huge success in creating fun, educational programming for provides resources, services & partnerships kids of different backgrounds within Lorain County. to help Ohio campuses deepen their ability to educate students for civic and social CAMPUS IMPACT responsibility and to improve community On the Oberlin College campus, Rafe Scobey-Thal and Erica life. Turett have worked to pave the road for future Discovery Camp counselors that are interested in the intersection between food, AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service cooking, nature, and art. As a final project, they will be creating a program designed specifically to fight manual for future counselors and programmers of the camp that poverty. Founded as Volunteers in Service list contacts with the Boys and Girls Clubs of Oberlin, Elyria, and to America in 1965 and incorporated into Lorain, Save Our Children, and House of Healing, both located in the AmeriCorps network of programs in Elyria. The manual will also include a list of indoor and outdoor 1993, VISTA has been on the front lines in games that are appropriate for different ages, different lessons the fight against poverty in America for that pertain to things on the farm, and a suggested schedule for more than 40 years. the camp. This manual will be a solid starting point for future years of camp. The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps* VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE: who create and expand programs designed to bring individuals and communities out of KEEPING THE PARTNERSHIP STRONG: poverty. VISTAs serve in the poorest areas Opportunities for future program growth include offering of their communities to tackle poverty- Oberlin college students the opportunity to continue and add to related problems such as hunger and the work of this year’s summer associates. The partnerships with homelessness, financial literacy, veteran The George Jones Memorial Farm and The New Agrarian student services, public health and college Center, as well as with The Boys and Girls Club and Save Our access. More information at: Children will continue to grow and will help to strengthen and www.ohiocampuscompact.org expand the Discovery Camp for kids. 16
  18. 18. ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: Shawnee State University The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support.HISTORY & BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurityKelly Hatas, former OCC AmeriCorps VISTA and graduate of VISTA Corps members: Danielle Boyles & Dot FlanaganShawnee State University, founded the Portsmouth Pantry Site Supervisor: Nikki KarabinisGarden (PPG) in 2007. It was originally located on a small plot in (740)351-3572 • nkarabinis@shawnee.eduShawnee State Forest by their Nature Center. The first growing Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director:season was a success. In 2008 Hatas, and fellow OCC Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.orgAmeriCorps VISTA, Sarah Lowe, expanded their gardening www.ohiocampuscompact.orgefforts. During the second summer of PPG, 2008, they added asmall plot at All Saints Episcopal Church. Hatas and Lowe began tobring in community partners to help sustain the garden. Scioto !Christian Ministries and their volunteers were key players inbringing the garden in the city and making it accessible for all.In 2009 the City of Portsmouth allowed PPG and newly foundedPortsmouth Community Garden nearly an acre of land to expandthe garden and it’s capacity for outreach. The plot is located atDoyle’s Landing boarding the Ohio River.Portsmouth Community Garden was formed by a small group ofPantry Garden volunteers who where interested in tending theirown garden space. The plot at Doyle’s landing was sharedbetween the two gardening efforts.In 2010 Hatas and Lowe received funding from Ohio CampusCompact to hire three Summer VISTAs to carry on their mission.Mason Bradbury, Josh Aeh, and Sarah Bachman worked full timeat Doyle’s Landing during the summer of 2010 and they were ableto raise and donate approximately 2000 pounds of food to give toSalvation Army’s pantry and God’s Pantry at Second PresbyterianChurch. “The dedication of the our current Summer VISTAs, Dot and Danielle, is tremendous. Thecommunity that is built around this garden is a wonderful thing for Portsmouth.” Sarah Lowe, !"#$%&&%()*&%+,$-.$#/0%"#+)12)324%5)62+7)1245"#26* Former OCC AmeriCorps VISTA 8"69%#:;4$-4;"+&"2%696),,%9)33"2)#%)324%&)-"&,"#26$%+< 17
  19. 19. ! COMMUNITY IMPACT Participating Service Providers:!! The Portsmouth Pantry Garden is a place of natural beauty and The VISTA Impact learning opportunities for community members to visit. This is a by the numbers: great opportunity for community members who are interested in Total Pantries Approximately having their own garden but might not have the resources to get Served: started. The Portsmouth Pantry Garden enables people to learn 15 more about gardening and different gardening techniques. PPG Total Estimated Volunteers: sponsored a Children’s Day at the Garden, where the VISTAs 120 teamed up with the Counseling Center Summer Outreach Program and brought children to enjoy a fun filled learning experience. This Total Estimated Pounds of Donated event enabled children of the community to share laughter, learn Fresh Fruits & Vegetables: about gardening, and to experience the unique feeling of helping 2,000 others. Activities included a rock-painting contest for row markers Estimated Number of Families in the garden and the biggest weed pulling challenge. Projects like Helped: these help these children understand that they are a part of a 1,250 community and they should invest their time into their community to make it better. Money Raised: $1,100 CAMPUS IMPACT This year’s VISTAs wanted to keep up the partnership between Shawnee State University and the garden strong as ever. By working with Nikki Karabinis, who coordinates most of the school’s volunteering and community service efforts, they were About Ohio Campus Compact able to do just that. More than 75 students of various ages and AmeriCorps*VISTA majors have been able to volunteer time with the pantry garden. Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide Community service is considered as an important factor in every nonprofit coalition of colleges and university student’s career at Shawnee and is often highly recommended by presidents and their campuses working to the faculty and administration. To continue the purpose of the promote the civic purposes of higher garden, the VISTAs have been able to work out a plan with education. Ohio Campus Compact provides Karabinis so that the students will be able to continue volunteering resources, services & partnerships to help and working in the garden this fall, well after the VISTAs’ eight Ohio campuses deepen their ability to educate week term of service is over. students for civic and social responsibility and to improve community life. OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE; KEEPING THE AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service PARTNERSHIP STRONG program designed specifically to fight poverty. Opportunities for future program growth include moving the Founded as Volunteers in Service to America garden and expanding the garden into an actual farm so that it in 1965 and incorporated into the AmeriCorps includes even more fruits and vegetables, and even animals such as network of programs in 1993, VISTA has been chickens, cows, and goats. Although this is more like a long term on the front lines in the fight against poverty in goal of this year’s VISTAs, this would create more opportunities for America for more than 40 years. the program to reach out to more of those in need. And with Scioto county being in one of ten counties in Ohio recorded as The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps* being under the poverty level, this would prove to be vital toward VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs sustaining efforts that would help the community to build a more who create and expand programs designed to self-reliant society once again. However, we would like to continue bring individuals and communities out of partnering with the Portsmouth Community Garden and work on poverty. VISTAs serve in the poorest areas of building a stronger relationship with more pantries in the near their communities to tackle poverty-related future. problems such as hunger and homelessness, financial literacy, veteran student services, public health and college access. More information at: www.ohiocampuscompact.org ! "#$%!&!($!)&*+,-!.$%!/.01+((23! 4(-)*(&)5!4.$)-6!7.-%1$! 18
  20. 20. ! Engaging campuses in service to the community. Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Impact Report 2011: University of Cincinnati The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*VISTA program strategically connects college resources with communities in need. Corps members gain valuable experience and educational awards. Campuses expand their civic outreach. And community partners receive critical support. !HISTORY & BACKGROUND Poverty Alleviation Focus Area: Food insecurity and hungerEven before the current economic downturn, child VISTA Corps members: Kelley O’Brien and Rick Samuhunger in the Cincinnati community has been a serious Site Supervisor:problem. Ohio, “the heart of it all,” has the 14th highest Kathy Dick (513) 556-6109 • kathy.dick@uc.edu Ohio Campus Compact VISTA Sr. Program Director:population of food insecure children in the nation, ranking Lesha Farias (740) 587-8571 • lfarias@ohiocampuscompact.org3rd in the Midwest. In Hamilton County, there are many www.ohiocampuscompact.orgfamilies that are unable to provide enough healthy food !for everyone, as there is an estimate 20.5% of childrenunder the age of 18 live in poverty.In an effort to build awareness of hunger issues in the UCcommunity OCC VISTA Corps members, Kelley O’Brienand Rick Samu, initiated the development of an urbancommunity garden on the university’s campus. Togetherwith Kathy Dick and Fran Larkin, Director and ProgramCoordinator of the Center for Community Engagementat UC, inspiration for a youth garden mentorship !program was sprouted in order to create direct linkagesbetween urban food production, low-income children,and the University of Cincinnati community. Enthusiasmfor this youth mentorship spread and a partnership tookroot between the Civic Garden Center of GreaterCOMMUNITY IMPACTParticipating Service Providers:As a result of collaboration between the Civic Garden Rick Samu, Ohio Campus Compact VISTA, watering raised beds at the Race St. Children’s Garden sponsored by theCenter’s Youth Education Coordinator, Madeline Dorger, Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnatiand VISTA Corps members, the youth garden mentorshipprogram was defined. Playfully dubbed GardenPals, the VISTA corps members from the University ofyearlong program will take place afterschool once-a-week, Cincinnati’s Center for Community Engagementwherein students from UC would be paired with a child supported the Civic Garden Center of Greaterexperiencing hardship and from the Cincinnati community. Cincinnati’s Race St. Children’s Garden in an effortDuring the fall and spring growing seasons, the Pal Pairs to attract more local children to the garden whichwill meet weekly at the Civic Garden Center’s Race Street serves as a safe drop-in site. Children are invitedChildren’s Garden and will be taught skills such as planting, to engage in education activities and offered awatering, weeding, harvesting, and other valuable healthy snack.techniques. In the winter, students will meet indoors, andan emphasis will be placed on how to cook, choose theright foods, and live healthily through exercise. 19
  21. 21. !"#$%%&()*(%+&,*-&,#*-.%&#%&Upon conclusion of the program, any food harvested that is notdirectly given back to the children participating will be donated to /($0123&"#$%%$&!()*+$,!the community through food distribution centers. This will allow &!for a greater range of indirect influence of our program. !"#%&4(%-5*0&(6&#5+&7,())8-59& .*$1%-:&5+&*+(8-15-.;&"#%&5)4*,&GardenPals as a whole will be created with an emphasis placed on #5+&/500&#*<%&(-&#%&,())8-59&/500&education and exploration, as most of the children involved may =%&5))%*+8$*=0%;3&"-*.,!/.*0+,!never get a chance to leave an urban environment. The goal of &GardenPals is to lay the foundations upon which the children can !>&?@@@@@@AB&)8123&"!12324!.5$!6!build for the rest of their lives, in such a way that benefits both !themselves and the rest of the world. !Applications will soon be available for students interested in The VISTA Impactbecoming a GardenPals mentor. GardenPals will be advertised at by the numbers:an upcoming Community Service Fair hosted by the University ofCincinnati’s Center for Community Engagement. Community Gardens Visited: 15CAMPUS IMPACT Produce Harvested: ~200 lbUrban agriculture has been shown to drastically improve thequality of life for all involved. Whether through decentralization of Community Partners: 6produce or through increased access to community gardens, theoverall security of the food supply is strengthened. Future Number of GardenPals: 40As such, VISTA Corps members envisioned a University of Weeds Pulled: ~1,000,000,000,000*Cincinnati Urban Community Garden to create a place where UCstudents gather to grow food and plants together; promote 7*895:!$;<+=.<$!organic and sustainable gardening practices, good health, andnutrition; and to create a growing movement to incorporatehealthy nutritious food into the needs of the surrounding About Ohio Campus Compactcommunities. AmeriCorps*VISTAOn a land-locked urban campus, however, locating a site for an Ohio Campus Compact is a statewide nonprofiturban community garden was not an easy task. An abundance of coalition of colleges and university presidents andtime went into exploring community gardens throughout the their campuses working to promote the civicGreater Cincinnati Area through volunteer work and proposal purposes of higher education. Ohio Campus Compact provides resources, services &writing. Thankfully hard work was paid off when a parcel of land partnerships to help Ohio campuses deepen theirwas granted to the VISTA members for the sole purpose of ability to educate students for civic and socialdeveloping a community garden. responsibility and to improve community life.UC community participation will be invited through an “Adopt-a- AmeriCorps*VISTA is the national service programGarden” program, in which UC organizations will commit to the designed specifically to fight poverty. Founded asmaintenance of a raised garden bed. Leadership of the garden will Volunteers in Service to America in 1965 andbe appointed to a student committee who has demonstrated incorporated into the AmeriCorps network ofinterest in organic and sustainable gardening practices. programs in 1993, VISTA has been on the frontThe creation of a vibrant social space as a vehicle to bring a lines in the fight against poverty in America forcommunity together is in the making. more than 40 years. The Ohio Campus Compact AmeriCorps*OPPORTUNITIES FOR THE FUTURE: VISTA Program places and supports VISTAs whoKEEPING THE PARTNERSHIP STRONG: create and expand programs designed to bringOpportunities for future program growth include the individuals and communities out of poverty. VISTAsimplementation and construction of the University of Cincinnati serve in the poorest areas of their communities toUrban Community Garden. Student garden leaders will complete tackle poverty-related problems such as hunger anda Community Garden Development Training Program put on this homelessness, financial literacy, veteran studentfall by the Civic Garden Center of Greater Cincinnati. services, public health and college access. More information at: www.ohiocampuscompact.org 20

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