Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core State Standards

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June 28
1:45 – 4:15pm
Room: Delaware C&D
Explore the Thoughtful Classroom Teacher Effectiveness Framework—a practical framework, aligned with the Common Core State Standards, for evaluating the effectiveness of classroom practice. Participants will learn how the framework helps teachers design standards-based lessons and units and select research-based strategies to ensure classroom lessons are effective and engaging. Participants will hear how one school district implemented a thoughtful evaluation process using this framework.
Main Presenter: Harvey Silver, Silver Strong and Associates

Published in: Education, Technology
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Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core State Standards

  1. 1. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards The Thoughtful Classroom Teacher Effectiveness Framework Presented by Tr. Harvey F. Silver EdD. 1 2 How effective has your current teacher evaluation  process been in developing the expertise of your  teachers and raising the achievement of your  students? 1. Not effective 2. Minimally effective 3. Somewhat effective 4. Effective 5. Highly effective  3 1
  2. 2. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Teacher observation and evaluation is considered  by many administrators to be…  “the third rail of education administration;  no one wants to touch it.” Pollock & Ford (2009) Source: Pollock, J. E. & Ford, S. M. (2009). Improving Student Learning One Principal  at a Time (p. 25).  Alexandria, VA: ASCD. A common thought amongst most administrators  regarding teacher observation and evaluation is that  these processes  “...gobbled huge amounts of time and effort without  g g making significant differences in teacher performance,  student achievement, or organizational culture.” Pollock & Ford (2009) Source: Pollock, J. E. & Ford, S. M. (2009). Improving Student Learning One Principal  5 at a Time (p. 25).  Alexandria, VA: ASCD. How Effective is Your  Present Teacher Evaluation Process? According to a 2008 report called Rush to Judgment:  Teacher Evaluation in Public Education… Most current supervisory and evaluative practices are  Most current supervisory and evaluative practices are “superficial, capricious, and often don’t even directly            address the quality of instruction, much less measure        students’ learning.” Toch & Rothman (2008) Rush to Judgment: Teacher Evaluation in Public Education 6 2
  3. 3. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Why Teacher Effectiveness? 1. Growing consensus around teacher effectiveness as the key to  raising student achievement and improving schools. 2. Understanding that teacher effectiveness can’t be improved  without first improving classroom instruction. without first improving classroom instruction 3. Recognition that improving teacher effectiveness is a shared  responsibility. 4. Greater accountability for school leaders to raise student  achievement by ensuring that all teachers are effective. 5. Belief that education is vital to the prosperity of our nation.   7 What does it mean  to be thoughtful? 8 What’s the Difference Between… buying a lottery ticket and starting an annuity  buying a bouquet and planting a rose bush  buying your child a cupcake and baking cupcakes with your child a grade on a report and feedback on a report 9 3
  4. 4. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards What’s the difference between           a thoughtful teacher evaluation       process and one that is designed    d th t i d i d simply to meet state mandates? 10 A Thoughtful Teacher Evaluation Process is… Manageable Measurable Meaningful 11 A Thoughtful Teacher Evaluation Process is… Manageable • Can it be adopted using available time and  resources? • Can educators easily collect, retrieve, and  d il ll i d analyze data? • Are there practical procedures and protocols  to support the process? 12 4
  5. 5. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards A Thoughtful Teacher Evaluation Process is… Measurable • Are the dimensions and indicators of teacher  effectiveness valid? • Are the observers trained to be reliable  h b i d b li bl assessors? • Will the process help us predict teacher  effectiveness? 13 A Thoughtful Teacher Evaluation Process is… Meaningful • Will it help teachers improve their  instructional practice? • Will it enhance communication about  effective teaching between and among  teachers and administrators? • Will it have a positive effect on student  achievement? 14 A Thoughtful Framework In this workshop we’ll be looking  Organization,  Positive  Preparing  closely at The Thoughtful  Rules, and  Procedures Students for New  Relationships Learning Classroom Teacher Effectiveness  Framework. Deepening and  Reflecting on and  Presenting New Reinforcing  Reinforcing Celebrating New  Celebrating New Learning Learning  Learning A Culture of  Engagement and  Thinking  Applying Learning Enjoyment and Learning Professional Practice  15 5
  6. 6. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Learning Goal To understand where The Thoughtful Classroom  Teacher Effectiveness Framework came from 16 1. Research 40 years of educational research tell us what works… Research clearly indicates the impact of each of these on student learning: Category Percentile Gain  Identifying Similarities & Differences              Identifying Similarities & Differences 45/25 Summarizing & Note‐taking  34/39 Reinforcing Effort & Providing Recognition 29 Homework & Practice 28/21 Non‐Linguistic Representation 27/19 Cooperative Learning 27/17 Setting Objectives & Providing Feedback 23/40 Generating & Testing Hypotheses 23/10 Questions, Cues, and Advance Organizers 22/33 Sources: From Classroom Instruction That Works by R. J. Marzano, D. J. Pickering, and J. E. Pollock, 2001, Alexandria, VA: ASCD © 2001 McREL. 17 Classroom Instruction That Works 2nd Edition by C.B., Dean, E.R. Hubbell, H. Pitler, and B.Stone, 2012, Alexandria, VA: ASCD. © 2012 McREL..  1. Research “The Thoughtful Classroom Program’s great power lies in its ability to explain 35 years of research in a way that is immediately accessible to teachers.” Robert J. Marzano, Author Classroom Instruction that Works, and The Art and Science of Teaching 18 6
  7. 7. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards 1. Research 19 2. Preeminent Teacher Effectiveness Models  and Studies Over the last five years, we’ve examined  all the preeminent teacher effectiveness  models and worked with hundreds of  schools to assess their strengths,  liabilities, and ability to help teachers and  li bili i d bili h l h d administrators improve.   20 2. Preeminent Teacher Effectiveness Models  and Studies The MET Project (Measures of Effective Teaching) • The largest study of teacher effectiveness ever undertaken. • Ongoing study with regular reports. • Includes over 3,000 teachers, 44,000 students, and 7,000  observations. • Funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Gathering Feedback for Teaching (2012) MET Project Research Paper  Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 21 7
  8. 8. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards 2. Preeminent Teacher Effectiveness Models  and Studies For example, we learned from the MET study that there is a new  condition  affecting educators called…             rubricitis. rub . ric . i .  tis (n)  a panic caused by the overwhelming  number of rubrics an observer must use to evaluate a  teacher 22 2. Preeminent Teacher Effectiveness Models  and Studies “When observers are overtaxed by the  cognitive load of tracking many different  competencies at once, their powers of  p , p discernment could decline.” Gathering Feedback for Teaching (2012) MET Project Research Paper  Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation 23 3. And most important, educators 24 8
  9. 9. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards A Framework to Address the  Challenges of Teacher Effectiveness How do the challenges highlighted by these  administrators compare with your ideas? 25 Learning Goal To learn the components of The Thoughtful  Classroom Teacher Effectiveness Framework and  how it’s both simple and deep 26 An Overview of the Framework —or— What makes The Thoughtful Classroom  Teacher Effectiveness Framework simple? 27 9
  10. 10. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards The Thoughtful Classroom  Teacher Effectiveness Framework 3 Components The Five Episodes of  10 Dimensions Effective Instruction Organization,  Positive  Preparing  Rules, and  Relationships Students  Procedures for New Learning The Four Cornerstones of  Deepening and  Reflecting on and  Presenting New  Effective Teaching  Reinforcing  Learning Celebrating Learning Learning A Culture of  Engagement and  Applying  Thinking  Enjoyment Learning and Learning Effective Professional Practice  28 Component One: The Four Cornerstones of  Effective Teaching (Dimensions 1, 2, 3, & 4) • Universal elements of  Organization,  Rules, and  Positive  Relationships quality instruction Procedures • Always relevant in any  classroom  l • Without the  cornerstones in place  Engagement and  A Culture of  Thinking  Enjoyment in the classroom,  and Learning student learning will  be compromised. 29 Component Two: Five Episodes of Effective  Instruction (Dimensions 5, 6, 7, 8, & 9) • Good instruction  Preparing  unfolds in a series of  Students for New  Learning learning episodes • Teachers use these Teachers use these  Deepening and  Reflecting on and  Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Celebrating New  Learning episodes to design  Learning  high‐quality lessons  and units Applying Learning • Ensures observer and  teacher are on the  same page  30 10
  11. 11. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Component Three: Professional Practice (Dimension 10)  • Looking beyond the  classroom • Commitment to: – Ongoing learning – The school  community  – Professionalism Professional Practice 31 A Closer Look at the Framework —or— What makes The  Wh t k Th Thoughtful Classroom Teacher  Effectiveness Framework deep? 32 The Value of Essential Questions • Each of the ten dimensions is driven by an  essential question. • These essential questions –KKeep schools focused on what’s important.  h l f d h t’ i t t – Promote school‐wide inquiry.  – Foster a common language for instruction and  how to improve it.  33 11
  12. 12. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Let’s take a closer look at the essential  questions for the Four Cornerstones… Organization,  Positive  Rules, and  Relationships Procedures Engagement  A Culture of  and  Thinking  Enjoyment and Learning 34 Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  learning and establish with your students and among  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? that clarify expectations? Deepening and Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning Learning A Culture of Thinking  Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment and Learning How do you develop a classroom  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice 35 What is Learning? Look at what four 2nd graders said when we asked them to explain  what learning meant to them:  36 12
  13. 13. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  learning and establish with your students and among  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? that clarify expectations? Organization, Rules, and  Deepening and Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning Procedures Learning How do you organize your  classroom to enhance learning  classroom to enhance learning and establish rules and  A Culture of Thinking  procedures that clarify  Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment and Learning expectations? How do you develop a classroom  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice 37 Organization, Rules, and Procedures What do we need to do to make…. • our classroom a good place for everyone to  learn? • our classroom a good place for you (the  l d l f (h student) to learn? 38 Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  learning and establish with your students and among  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? that clarify expectations? Deepening and Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning Positive Relationships Learning How do you build meaningful  relationships with your students  relationships with your students and among students to promote  A Culture of Thinking  learning? Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment and Learning How do you develop a classroom  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice 39 13
  14. 14. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Positive Relationships  What makes for a great class?   A recent Gallup Youth Survey asked students  how good teachers helped them learn.   how good teachers helped them learn The number one response: Students  learn best when the teacher cares about and  respects students.  40 Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  learning and establish with your students and among  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? that clarify expectations? Deepening and Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning A Culture of Thinking  Learning and Learning How do you develop a classroom  culture that promotes serious  learning and sophisticated forms  A Culture of Thinking  Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment and Learning of thinking?  How do you develop a classroom  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice 41 A Culture of Thinking and Learning What is thinking? • The philosopher, Martin Heidegger said,  “Thinking is an engagement of the mind that  changes the mind.” g • A great teacher, Richard Strong said, “Thought  is the pursuit of purpose under conditions of  uncertainty.” • A second grader said, “Thinking is what you do  when you don’t know what to do.” 42 14
  15. 15. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards The Power of Pooh 43 The Power of Pooh Owl found Piglet in a whirlpool  and Pooh in a honey pot.  What’s missing? 44 Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  learning and establish with your students and among  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? that clarify expectations? Deepening and Reinforcing  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning Engagement and Enjoyment Learning How do you motivate students to  How do you motivate students to do their best work and inspire  A Culture of Thinking  the love of learning? Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment and Learning How do you develop a classroom  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice 45 15
  16. 16. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Engagement and Enjoyment  A simple experiment We asked over 200 teachers two questions:  1) Why did you become a teacher? 2) At your retirement dinner, what would you  hope your students would say you taught  them? 46 ...The love of learning  ...The love of learning 47 “The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those  who read and write, but those who cannot learn,  unlearn, and relearn. unlearn and relearn ”  – Alvin Toffler, futurist 48 16
  17. 17. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Taking the Cornerstones Out for a Test Drive 1. Break up into teams of four.  Each member of  the team will be responsible for one  cornerstone.   2. Review the essential questions, teaching  indicators, and student behaviors for your  cornerstone. (Use the observation forms  found in your materials). 49 See next page for activity sheets Taking the Cornerstones Out for a Test Drive Take 1 3. Together, we’ll be watching a classroom  video.  As you watch the video, use the  observation form for your cornerstone.  4. Identify teaching behaviors and student  4 Identify teaching behaviors and student behaviors that are evident in this classroom.   Make notes on what you observed in the  space labeled “Provide Evidence.” 50 Taking the Cornerstones Out for a Test Drive Take 1 1. Meet with the members from other teams  who had the same cornerstone as you.   2. Share and compare your observations.   3. Return to your home team. Share what  you’ve learned about using your cornerstone  to conduct a classroom observation. 51 17
  18. 18. Observing Dimension One: Organization, Rules, and Procedures Essential Question: How does the teacher organize the classroom to enhance learning and establish rules and procedures that clarify expectations? Which instructional indicators are evident? FEEDBACK NOTES REMEMBER: Quality instruction does not Provide Evidence (Collect evidence that supports what you mean addressing all indicators. observed.) 1.1: Organizing classroom space (e.g., seating, resources, technology, decoration) to ensure safety, maximize learning, and meet overall goals and objectives 1.2: Keeping the flow of activities in the classroom moving smoothly 1.3: Establishing a manageable set of classroom rules and procedures and communicating with students about them regularly (e.g., posting them, modeling them, explaining the rationale behind them, discussing their applications in the classroom, and refining them as needed) 1.4: Providing clear directions for classroom tasks using a variety of modalities (e.g., verbal, visual, physical demonstration) and checking to make sure students understand their roles and responsibilities Praise (Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance 1.5: Developing an effective plan for managing learning.) student behavior that includes positive consequences, negative consequences, and an appropriate level of home involvement 1.6: Managing non-instructional duties (e.g., taking attendance, distributing materials and take-home notices, lunch counts) with minimal disruption to Pose (Ask questions that foster reflection on the teacher’s classroom learning decisions and their impact.) 1.7: Working effectively with other adults in the classroom (e.g., co-teachers, paraprofessionals, aides, student teachers) IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING Propose (Decide—collaboratively, if possible—on how to improve practice.) REMEMBER: The ultimate result of quality teaching is quality learning. Look for these student behaviors, which are some of the sure signs of teacher effectiveness.Students… Show respect for each other and the classroom. Have access to necessary supplies and resources. Understand and follow classroom rules and ASSESSMENT RUBRIC procedures. When you feel you have enough information, use this Make good use of their time. rubric to assess the teacher’s overall effectiveness within Know what to do (self-directed). this dimension. (Note: See the complete Four-Point Assessment Take responsibility for their own learning. Rubric for a full description of each level of effectiveness.) Have a positive attitude.  (1) Novice – Minimal or no commitment to this dimension Use conflict-resolution techniques when there is a  (2) Developing – Initial commitment to this dimension disagreement.  (3) Proficient – Clear commitment to this dimension  (4) Expert – Strong commitment to this dimension18
  19. 19. Observing Dimension Two: Positive Relationships Essential Question: How does the teacher build meaningful relationships with the students and among students to promote learning? Which instructional indicators are evident? FEEDBACK NOTES REMEMBER: Quality instruction does not Provide Evidence (Collect evidence that supports what you mean addressing all indicators. observed.) 2.1: Maintaining a positive and “with it” demeanor that shows students their teacher cares about what’s going on in the classroom and is committed to the idea that “we’re all in this together” 2.2: Getting to know students and incorporating their interests, aspirations, and backgrounds into the curriculum 2.3: Differentiating instruction and assessment so students of all styles and ability levels can experience the joys of success 2.4: Building a classroom community that insists on respect and mutual support for each student’s learning and provides opportunities for students to become familiar with each other 2.5: Designing learning experiences that call for high levels of collaboration, discussion, and Praise (Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance interaction among students learning.) 2.6: Maintaining an open and appropriate level of communication with students and the home 2.7: Showing care and concern for students as individuals Pose (Ask questions that foster reflection on the teacher’s decisions and their impact.) IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING REMEMBER: The ultimate result of quality teaching is Propose (Decide—collaboratively, if possible—on how to quality learning. Look for these student behaviors, which improve practice.) are some of the sure signs of teacher effectiveness.Students… Are respectful of each other and the teacher. Collaborate with each other. Participate in whole-class and small-group discussions. ASSESSMENT RUBRIC Feel that “We’re all in this together.” When you feel you have enough information, use this Display empathy. rubric to assess the teacher’s overall effectiveness within Share their feelings. this dimension. (Note: See the complete Four-Point Assessment Resolve conflicts. Rubric for a full description of each level of effectiveness.) Have a voice.  (1) Novice – Minimal or no commitment to this dimension  (2) Developing – Initial commitment to this dimension  (3) Proficient – Clear commitment to this dimension  (4) Expert – Strong commitment to this dimension 19
  20. 20. Observing Dimension Three: Engagement and Enjoyment Essential Question: How does the teacher motivate students to do their best work and inspire the love of learning? Which instructional indicators are evident? FEEDBACK NOTES REMEMBER: Quality instruction does not Provide Evidence (Collect evidence that supports what you mean addressing all indicators. observed.) 3.1: Engaging students in diverse forms of thinking (e.g., practical, analytical, creative, exploring feelings and values) 3.2: Using key “motivational levers” like controversy, choice, competition, challenge, and creativity to increase students’ commitment to learning 3.3: Maintaining a high level of student excitement and on-task behavior using a wide variety of tools and strategies 3.4: Communicating and maintaining a passion for teaching, learning, and quality work throughout lessons and units 3.5: Tapping into the power of “selfhood”: encouraging students to pursue their own interests, make their own choices, develop their Praise (Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance own perspectives, and express their values and learning.) dreams 3.6: Creating a classroom environment that has the capacity to inspire and delight (e.g., through enthusiasm, humor, novelty, color, movement) Pose (Ask questions that foster reflection on the teacher’s decisions and their impact.) IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING REMEMBER: The ultimate result of quality teaching is Propose (Decide—collaboratively, if possible—on how to quality learning. Look for these student behaviors, which improve practice.) are some of the sure signs of teacher effectiveness.Students… Are energetic and enthusiastic. Display effort. Enjoy themselves in the classroom. Express their own interests, ideas, and insights. Are on-task and motivated. ASSESSMENT RUBRIC Stretch their minds with different forms of When you feel you have enough information, use this thinking. rubric to assess the teacher’s overall effectiveness within this dimension. (Note: See the complete Four-Point Assessment Rubric for a full description of each level of effectiveness.)  (1) Novice – Minimal or no commitment to this dimension  (2) Developing – Initial commitment to this dimension  (3) Proficient – Clear commitment to this dimension  (4) Expert – Strong commitment to this dimension20
  21. 21. Observing Dimension Four: A Culture of Thinking and Learning Essential Question: How does the teacher develop a classroom culture that promotes serious learning and sophisticated forms of thinking? Which instructional indicators are evident? FEEDBACK NOTES REMEMBER: Quality instruction does not Provide Evidence (Collect evidence that supports what you mean addressing all indicators. observed.) 4.1: Challenging students’ minds with rigorous texts and content and equipping them with the skills they need to handle rigorous content 4.2: Engaging students in extended, higher-order thinking challenges (e.g., inquiry, investigation, problem-based learning, action research projects) 4.3: Encouraging and challenging students to support their written and spoken ideas with evidence 4.4: Probing, extending, and clarifying student responses using effective questioning and recognition techniques 4.5: Encouraging discussion, dialogue, and debate around important ideas 4.6: Requiring students to use critical academic vocabulary in their speaking and writing Praise (Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance 4.7: Using technology as a tool for fostering critical learning.) thinking, creative expression, and problem solving 4.8: Teaching students how to use strategies on their own, as tools and frameworks for thinking and learning (e.g., moving from using Compare & Contrast to teaching students how to conduct their own comparative analyses) Pose (Ask questions that foster reflection on the teacher’s decisions and their impact.) IMPACT ON STUDENT LEARNING REMEMBER: The ultimate result of quality teaching is Propose (Decide—collaboratively, if possible—on how to quality learning. Look for these student behaviors, which improve practice.) are some of the sure signs of teacher effectiveness.Students… Use different forms of critical thinking. Show curiosity. Use thinking and learning strategies. Support their thinking with evidence. ASSESSMENT RUBRIC Use academic vocabulary. When you feel you have enough information, use this Ask meaningful questions. rubric to assess the teacher’s overall effectiveness within Challenge themselves. this dimension. (Note: See the complete Four-Point Assessment Apply technology in meaningful ways. Rubric for a full description of each level of effectiveness.) Exhibit habits of mind to work through problems.  (1) Novice – Minimal or no commitment to this dimension  (2) Developing – Initial commitment to this dimension  (3) Proficient – Clear commitment to this dimension  (4) Expert – Strong commitment to this dimension 21
  22. 22. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Let’s take a closer look at the essential  questions for the five episodes… Preparing  Students for New  Learning Deepening and  Reflecting on  Presenting New Reinforcing  and Celebrating  Learning Learning  New Learning Applying  Learning 52 Organization, Rules, and  Preparing Students  Positive Relationships Procedures for New Learning How do you organize  How do you build  How do you establish your  your classroom to enhance  meaningful relationships  purpose, activate students’ prior  learning and establish with your students and among  knowledge, and prepare  rules and procedures  students to promote learning? students for learning? that clarify expectations? Deepening and Reinforcing  Preparing Students  Presenting New Learning Reflecting on and Celebrating Learning for New Learning How do you present new   Learning How do you help students  How do you establish your  How do you help students look  information and provide  solidify their understanding  opportunities for students to  back on their learning and refine  and practice new skills? d purpose, activate students prior purpose activate students’ prior  their learning process? k ll ? actively engage with content? knowledge, and prepare  A Culture of Thinking  Applying Learning Engagement and Enjoyment students for learning? and Learning How do students demonstrate  How do you develop a classroom  their learning and what kinds of  How do you motivate students  culture that promotes serious  evidence do you collect to assess  to do their best work and inspire  learning and sophisticated  their progress?  the love of learning? forms of thinking? Professional Practice How do you demonstrate your commitment to professional learning and  53 to the school community? Dimension 5: Preparing Students for New Learning  Indicators of Quality Teaching Behavior 5.1 Selecting relevant standards that are appropriate to your content and grade level 5.2 “Unpacking” standards and turning them into clear, measurable learning goals and  targets 5.3 Using essential questions to guide learning and promote deep thinking 5.4 Beginning lessons and units with engaging “hooks”—thought‐provoking activities  or questions that capture student interest and activate their prior knowledge or questions that capture student interest and activate their prior knowledge 5.5 Introducing students to the key vocabulary terms they will need to know and  understand to successfully learn the content 5.6 Assessing students’ background knowledge, skill levels, and interests relative to  learning goals and targets 5.7 Helping students develop insights into the products they’ll be creating,  performances they’ll be delivering, and/or tasks they’ll be completing to  demonstrate what they’ve learned (e.g., providing models of high‐quality work,  rubrics, checklists, etc.) 5.8 Encouraging students to establish personal learning goals and plans for achieving  them 54 22
  23. 23. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Some teacher evaluation frameworks  separate planning, instruction, and  assessment. The Thoughtful Classroom Teacher  The Thoughtful Classroom Teacher Effectiveness Framework integrates planning,  instruction, and assessment within each of  the five instructional episodes. Here’s how… 55 Dimension 5: Preparing Students for New Learning  Indicators of Quality Teaching Behavior PLANNING INDICATORS 5.1 Selecting relevant standards that are appropriate  to your content and grade level to your content and grade level 5.2 “Unpacking” standards and turning them into  clear, measurable learning goals and targets 56 Dimension 5: Preparing Students for New Learning  Indicators of Quality Teaching Behavior INSTRUCTIONAL INDICATORS 5.3 Using essential questions to guide learning and  promote deep thinking 5.4 Beginning lessons and units with engaging  54B i i l d i ih i “hooks”—thought‐provoking activities or questions  that capture student interest and activate their  prior knowledge 5.5 Introducing students to the key vocabulary terms  they will need to know and understand to  successfully learn the content 57 23
  24. 24. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Dimension 5: Preparing Students for New Learning  Indicators of Quality Teaching Behavior ASSESSMENT INDICATORS 5.6 Assessing students’ background knowledge, skill  levels, and interests relative to learning goals and  targets 5.7 Helping students develop insights into the products  they’ll be creating, performances they’ll be  delivering, and/or tasks they’ll be completing to  demonstrate what they’ve learned (e.g., providing  models of high‐quality work, rubrics, checklists, etc.) 5.8 Encouraging students to establish personal learning  goals and plans for achieving them 58 Dimension 5: Preparing Students for New Learning  Impact on Student Achievement  Students… • Understand/restate learning goals in their own words. • Ask questions about learning goals. • K Know what they have to produce and what’s expected  h t th h t d d h t’ t d of them. • Assess own knowledge of vocabulary. • Call up their prior knowledge. • Generate questions about content or personal goals. • Understand the plan for learning.  59 A “Simple and Deep” Framework  Dimensions of  Indicators of  Impact on Student  Teacher Effectiveness  Quality Teacher  Learning (Essential Questions) (Essential Questions) Behavior  Beha ior 60 24
  25. 25. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Learning Goal To learn the five episodes of effective instruction Preparing  Students  St d t for New  Learning Deepening and  Reflecting on  Presenting New  Reinforcing  and Celebrating Learning Learning Learning Applying  Learning 61 Taking the Episodes Out for a Test Drive Take 1 We’ll be looking at a classroom in which a  teacher is preparing students for new learning  (Dimension 5). As you watch the video, use the  short form to identify relevant indicators and short form to identify relevant indicators and  student behaviors. 62 Forms will be distributed Taking the Episodes Out for a Test Drive Take 1 How did you do? Share and compare your observation notes with  your group. 63 25
  26. 26. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Learning Goal To learn how to use the 4Ps to better feedback 64 The 4Ps to Better Feedback Provide Evidence: Collect evidence that supports what you observed. Praise: Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance learning. Pose: Ask questions that foster reflection on the teacher’s decisions  and their impact on student learning. Propose: Decide—collaboratively, if possible—on how to improve  practice. 65 The 4Ps to Better Feedback 4. Propose (Decide—collaboratively if possible—on how to improve practice.) 1. Provide Evidence (List specific, evidence to support what you observed.) 2. Praise (Recognize positive teaching behaviors that enhance learning.) 3. Pose (Ask questions that foster reflection on teacher’s decisions and  The targets were posted, but I think it’s important that all students really  Standards were clear and posted as student‐friendly learning goals. Great hook!  Using a “what if” question really engaged students and got  their impact.) internalize those targets.  You might try the 5‐S Goal Sharing tool to accomplish  Hook was used to activate prior knowledge. Backward Learning tool What them to tap into their prior knowledge gthe I was really interested in p g g y them to tap into their prior knowledge. g I was really interested in how you used the Backward Learning tool. What  how you used p this. Used the Backwards Learning tool to help students understand what they                    effect does it have on student focus and self‐assessment over the week? needed to know and do by unit’s end. 66 26
  27. 27. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards The 4Ps to Better Feedback Based on your observation of the last classroom we  observed… • What specific evidence do you want to provide to the  teacher? • What do you want to praise? • What question(s) do you want to pose? • What would you propose? 67 Weather Report What is it? A check‐for‐understanding tool that tells us what  students are clear about and what s still foggy. students are clear about and what’s still foggy 68 Weather Report What’s your weather report for today’s workshop? 69 27
  28. 28. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Learning Goal To learn how to conduct a formal observation  using The Thoughtful Classroom Teacher  Effectiveness Framework 70 The Formal Observation Process Pre‐Observation Classroom  Observation Post‐ Observation Written Evaluation 71 Pre‐Observation Questions • Where are you in your lesson sequence? • What are the learning goals for the particular lesson I’ll be observing? • How will student learning be assessed? • What learning opportunities will you provide to achieve your goals?  • What questions do you have about the lesson? These questions provide focus, but on their own may not lead to  deep thinking and learning.  To make sure that our teacher  conferences lead to high levels of thinking and learning, we can  look to the insights from cognitive coaching. 28
  29. 29. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Agree or Disagree? • New teachers have a greater capacity for growth than  seasoned teachers. • With all the research we now have, it is possible to develop a  recipe or formula that ensures effective instruction. • Teachers’ observable behaviors are based on internal thinking  and decision‐making processes. • The primary job of an instructional coach is to expose internal  thinking so that it can be explored, refined, and turned into  better classroom practice. 73 See next page for activity sheet Improving Conferences with Cognitive Coaching Cognitive Coaching Assumptions • All human beings are capable of change and continue to grow  cognitively. • Teaching cannot be reduced to a formula or a recipe. g p • Teachers’ observable behaviors are based on their internal  thinking and decision making. • Skillful coaches can significantly enhance a teacher’s cognitive  processes.  This, in turn, leads to better decisions and better  teaching. 74 Classroom Observation Pre‐Observation For formal observations, observers  typically use a four‐point rubric to  Classroom  assess the teacher’s effectiveness. Observation Ob ti Post‐ Observation Written Evaluation 75 29
  30. 30. Agree or Disagree Agree    New teachers have a greater capacity for growth than seasoned teachers. Disagree           Agree    With all the research we now have, it is possible to develop a recipe or formula Disagree  that ensures effective instruction.         Agree    Teachers’ observable behaviors are based on internal thinking and decision‐Disagree  making processes.         Agree    The primary job of an instructional coach is to expose internal thinking so that Disagree  it can be explored, refined, and turned into better classroom practice.           30
  31. 31. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Classroom Observation <none> 4—Expert Strong commitment to effective  instruction that shows advanced  expertise. The teacher applies relevant  instructional practices and is able to adapt  them to students’ needs and particular  learning situations. These practices have a  consistently positive impact on student  learning.  3—Proficient Clear commitment to effective instruction.  The teacher applies relevant instructional  practices that have a positive impact on  student learning. 2—Developing Initial commitment to effective  instruction. The teacher is using relevant instructional practices but the practices  need further refinement. With  refinement, the impact on student  learning can be increased. 1—Novice Minimal or no commitment to effective  instruction. The practices are not being  used or need reconsideration because  they are not having their intended effects  on student learning. 76 Classroom Observation Instructional Rubrics (4) Expert  – Strong commitment to effective instruction that  shows advanced expertise.   h d d i – The teacher applies relevant instructional  practices and is able to adapt them to learning  situations.   – These practices have a consistently positive  impact on student learning.  77 Classroom Observation Pre‐Observation Now, based on your notes and this  teacher’s learning goals, reflect on the  overall effectiveness of the lesson.  Use  Classroom  the instructional rubric to assess this  Observation Ob ti teacher’s effectiveness. Post‐ 1 Novice: Minimal or no commitment to effective  Observation instruction.  2 Developing: Initial commitment to effective instruction.  3 Proficient: Clear commitment to effective instruction.  Written Evaluation 4 Expert: Strong commitment to effective instruction that  shows advanced expertise.  31
  32. 32. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Post‐Observation Post‐observation questions are guided by 5 Rs: Pre‐Observation Review: What happened? React: What were your reactions?  What were students’  reactions? Classroom  Reasons: What caused you to think/feel this way?    Observation What caused students to think/feel this way? Rethink: What have you learned?   What would you do differently? Post‐Observation Reflect: How did the entire observation process help you?  How can we improve it together? Written Evaluation See next page for activity sheet Learning Goal To learn how The Thoughtful Classroom Teacher  Effectiveness Framework promotes continuous  learning and growth 80 Promoting Teacher Growth Teacher Self‐Assessment Professional Growth Plan Targeted Professional  Development and PLCs Assessing Teacher Growth 81 32
  33. 33. Post‐Observation Protocol Using the 5 Rs Review:  – What happened in the lesson?  – What did you do?  – What did the students do?  – What was the sequence of questions, statements, and activities?  React:          Reasons:          Rethink:         Reflect:           33
  34. 34. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Teacher Self‐Assessment Guide Teacher Self‐Assessment The Teacher Self‐Assessment  Guide allows teachers to reflect  on and assess their classroom  Professional Growth  practice according to the same  Plan dimensions and indicators that  dimensions and indicators that administrators use to guide  Targeted Professional  observations.  Development and PLCs Assessing Teacher Growth 82 Why Self‐Assessment? We know self‐assessment is one of the most  powerful tools for enhancing student learning.  It’s also a powerful tool for enhancing adult  learning. learning Self‐assessment leads to growth. 83 Why Self‐Assessment? • What is a goal that you’d like to achieve or have  recently achieved? • What are some of the steps you’d need to take or  took to achieve your goal? took to achieve your goal? 84 34
  35. 35. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Teacher Professional Growth Plan Teacher Self‐Assessment Professional Growth  Plan Targeted Professional  Development and PLCs Assessing Teacher Growth 85 Targeted Professional Development Teacher Self‐Assessment The Framework is integrated with  PD 360, the most extensive  Professional Growth  Plan professional development video  lib library in the country.  i th t Targeted Professional  Development and PLCs • Online • On‐demand 24/7 • Research‐based Assessing Teacher Growth • Ultimate flexibility 86 Targeted Professional Development For observers…  Based on observation data, observers select  relevant PD 360 videos that correspond to  identified needs.  identified needs 87 35
  36. 36. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Targeted Professional Development For teachers… Teachers build a customized professional growth  plan using the Teacher‐Self Assessment Guide  and the PD 360 video library. and the PD 360 video library 88 Targeted Professional Development 89 Targeted Professional Development and Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) To facilitate the development of Professional Learning  Communities (PLCs) and help teachers grow together,  we’ve also developed Strategic Teacher PLC Guides with  ASCD. 90 36
  37. 37. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards How Do We Assess Teacher Growth? Organization,  Preparing  Positive  A comprehensive  Rules, and  Procedures Students for New  Relationships assessment includes  Learning looking beyond the  classroom.   g Deepening and  Reflecting on and  Presenting New P i N Reinforcing  Celebrating  Learning Learning Learning  Commitments: Ongoing learning  A Culture of  Thinking  Applying Learning Engagement and  Enjoyment and professional  and Learning growth Professional Practice  The school  community  Professionalism 91 How Do We Assess Teacher Growth? For these three “commitments” to  Teacher Self‐Assessment professional practice, what are some of  the indicators of teacher behavior you  Professional Growth  might look for? Plan Targeted Professional  A commitment to… Development and PLCs • Ongoing learning and professional  growth? Assessing Teacher Growth • The school community? • Professionalism? 92 Assessing Teacher Growth Commitment to Professional Growth  INDICATORS RUBRIC (1) Novice: The teacher is reluctant or  10.1 Self‐assessing and working to  resistant to professional growth.  improve  his or her own classroom  (2) Developing: The teacher has made an  p practice. p g initial commitment to professional growth  10.2 Developing and implementing a  and applies new learning in the classroom.  (3) Proficient: The teacher has made a  professional growth plan. clear commitment to professional growth  10.3 Seeking out professional  and regularly applies new learning in the  development and continuous  classroom.  learning opportunities. (4) Expert: The teacher has made a strong  commitment to professional growth that is  10.4 Working with colleagues to improve  highly evident. The teacher is adept at  practice throughout the building as  translating new learning into improved  part of a professional learning  classroom practice. In addition, the  teacher has taken an active role in  community. promoting professional learning  93 throughout the school. 37
  38. 38. Teacher Effectiveness: Fulfilling the Promise of the Common Core Standards Assessing Teacher Growth Commitment to the School Community INDICATORS RUBRIC (1) Novice: The teacher is not contributing  10.6 Maintaining open communication  to the school community beyond his or her  with the entire school community  classroom.  (e.g., administrators, teachers,  (2) Developing: The teacher will contribute  parents, students). to the larger school community, but often  10.7 Assuming appropriate leadership  requires prompting from colleagues or  roles (e.g., mentor, instructional  superiors.  (3) Proficient: The teacher is a regular and  coach, teacher‐leader). active contributor to the school  10.8 Helping maintain and build a positive  community.  school culture (e.g., through athletic  (4) Expert: The teacher contributes to the  coaching, volunteerism, and other  school community consistently and with  forms of non‐required participation or  passion and enthusiasm. The teacher is  contribution). recognized as a leader and role model  94 within the school community. Assessing Teacher Growth Commitment to Professionalism INDICATORS RUBRIC (1) Novice: The teacher needs to be reminded of  10.8 Maintaining a high level of  school rules and has little to no awareness of larger  professionalism at all times. educational policy (e.g., state and national  p y( g, 10.9 Becoming aware of and  initiatives). adhering to legal  (2) Developing: The teacher generally follows  responsibilities and current  school rules but has only a basic awareness of  educational policies of the  educational policy beyond the school walls.  (3) Proficient: The teacher adheres to school rules  school, district, and state. and is generally aware of major changes in  educational policy.  (4) Expert: The teacher is a committed professional  who follows and promotes school rules. The  teacher understands the purpose of educational  policies and how they affect classroom practice and  95 the educational community. Learning Goal To learn how to use The Thoughtful Classroom  Teacher Effectiveness Framework to make better  summative evaluations 96 38

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