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Getting Down to the Nitty Gritty of Data: Becoming A Data-Driven District
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Getting Down to the Nitty Gritty of Data: Becoming A Data-Driven District

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Getting Down to the Nitty Gritty of Data: Becoming A Data-Driven District …

Getting Down to the Nitty Gritty of Data: Becoming A Data-Driven District
June 27, 3:15 – 4:15pm, Room: Franklin C
Bloom Carroll School District went from being “Effective” to “Excellent with Distinction” in a few short years. Having high district expectations and becoming a data-driven district achieved these results. Information and handouts will be shared with participants, describing how this district's performance index, AYP, state indicators, and value-added scores improved. Learn how one school is striving to change the culture of the district.
Main Presenter: Starr Martin, Fairfield County Educational Service Center
Co-Presenter(s): Cindy Freeman and Melissa Ward, Bloom Carroll Schools

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • 1. Getting Down to theNitty-Gritty of Data Bloom-Carroll Local School District
  • 2. District Data Distribution Curriculum Director Principals Teachers Students
  • 3. Curriculum Director’s Role Presented by: Starr Martin Curriculum Director Bloom-Carroll Local School District smartin@bloomcarroll.net
  • 4. LRC/PI/VA/AYPReportsDistribution ofInformation
  • 5. OAA Results
  • 6. Student Report Individual Student Report
  • 7. 2011 OAA Tested (Grade 6)Math Students in Subgroup 1 L- Limited B- Basic P- Proficient A- Accelerated ADV- Advanced
  • 8. 2011 OAA Tested (Grade 6)Math Students in Subgroup 2 L- Limited B- Basic P- Proficient A- Accelerated ADV- Advanced
  • 9. 2011 OAA Tested (Grade 6)Math Students in Subgroup 3 L- Limited B- Basic P- Proficient A- Accelerated ADV- Advanced
  • 10. 2011 OAA Tested (Grade 6)Math Students in Subgroup 4 L- Limited B- Basic P- Proficient A- Accelerated ADV- Advanced
  • 11. 2011 OAA Tested (Grade 6)Math Students in Subgroup 5 L- Limited B- Basic P- Proficient A- Accelerated ADV- Advanced
  • 12. Projected Report
  • 13. Probability Report
  • 14. Teacher Value Added Data
  • 15. Principal’s Role Presented by: Cindy Freeman Principal Bloom-Carroll Intermediate School cfreeman@bloomcarroll.net
  • 16. Organizing Teacher Data Teams
  • 17. Presenting Data to the Teachers Collaborate and Set Expectations Evaluate and Post Assessment Organize Data Continually Professional Assess and Learning Discuss Communities
  • 18. Collaborate and Set Expectations Teachers and Administrators work together to design the vision for the intervention program. Teachers continually work together discussing student needs. A scheduled time is set aside each day for collaboration. The leadership of the “data team” rotates.
  • 19. Quarterly Assessment Report Look closely at the deficits and accomplishments of the students. Organize them using the data .
  • 20. EvaluateDecide on the type of data to use.  State Data – Identify at-risk students  Quarterly Assessments  Unit tests  Testing of Computation Skills
  • 21. Professional Learning Communities Flexible Grouping• Three times a week, students are administered leveled-timed tests over mathematics facts• Student progress on these timed tests is self-recorded on a bar graph (3rd and 4th grades) and a line graph (5th grade)• Specific learning objectives are identified based on OAA Tests, Quarterly assessments and unit tests• Students are grouped according to mastery of specific Academic Content Standards• Two days a week, time is spent reviewing standards already taught. As students become even more proficient, levels of critical thinking and problem-solving are increased .
  • 22. Post AssessmentAt the end of the agreed time frame students aregiven post assessments . Post assessments vary fromgroup to group due to levels of skills.However, groups at the same skill level are givencommon assessments.
  • 23. “Isolation is the Enemy of Improvement” Wagner, T., et al. (2005), Change Leadership: A Practical Guide to Transforming School
  • 24. Teacher’s Role Presented by: Melissa Ward 6th Grade Teacher Bloom-Carroll Middle School mward@bloomcarroll.net
  • 25. Syllabus
  • 26. Pre-Assessment
  • 27. Item Analysis
  • 28. Standards-BasedTests
  • 29. Analyze Data From Tests Adding Subtracting Multiplying Dividing One Step Intergers Integers Integers Integers Equations GradesStudent A 80 80 100 80 100 88Student B 80 100 100 80 80 88Student C 60 60 40 20 60 48Student D 100 100 80 100 0 76Student E 80 80 60 100 80 80Student F 100 60 40 20 80 60Student G 100 100 80 60 80 84Student H 40 60 20 0 20 28Student I 80 60 100 80 80 80Student J 100 100 100 100 100 100Student K 100 80 60 80 80 80Student L 100 80 60 60 80 76Student M 80 100 100 100 100 96 84.61538 81.538462 72.307692 67.692308 72.3077 75.692
  • 30. Grouping Students For Intervention Adding Subtracting Multiplying Dividing One Step Intergers Integers Integers Integers Equations Student H 40 60 20 0 20 Student C 60 60 40 20 60 Student F 100 60 40 20 80 Student G 100 100 80 60 80 Student L 100 80 60 60 80 Student A 80 80 100 80 100 Student B 80 100 100 80 80 Student I 80 60 100 80 80 Student K 100 80 60 80 80 Student D 100 100 80 100 0 Student E 80 80 60 100 80 Student J 100 100 100 100 100 Student M 80 100 100 100 100 84.61538 81.538462 72.307692 67.692308 72.3077
  • 31. Study Island- Student Reports
  • 32. Study Island- State-vs-Student Report
  • 33. Using Data in Conferences Name John Smith Math 6- Mrs. Ward 1st Nine Weeks Grade 86% Absences 1 ½ days 5th Grade OAA Score 406 400 is passing, but on Proficient Number of Missing Assignments 1 level. Our goal is to have students in the top two categories which is accelerated or advanced. Study Island Notes: First 9 weeks 6 out of 6. Always prepared for class. Second 9 weeks 12 out of 18. Due Pays attention 12/22. Asks for help if needed. Strengths Needs Improvement 1. Prime Factorization -100% 1. Converting Fractions to Percents- 2. Divisibility Rules- 80% 60% 3. Reducing Fractions-80% 2. Using the GCF to Reduce Fractions- 60%
  • 34. The Power of Great Assessment: Using Rather Than Reporting Data Report Data to:  Use Data to: update parents, principals, school  inform instructional strategies track student’s progress  measure growth over time Reward or consequence students  identify misunderstandings & measure mastery
  • 35. Student’s Role Presented by: Cindy Freeman Principal Bloom-Carroll Intermediate School cfreeman@bloomcarroll.net
  • 36. Presenting Data to the Students Review OAA Results Study Grade Level Island/Flexible Student Meetings Grouping Complete Student Individual Student Value Added Meetings Charts
  • 37. Student InvolvementStudents are made aware of theirstrengths and weaknesses throughindividual conferences andexpectations are set for students.
  • 38. Goals of Student MeetingsGrade Level Meetings Explained Value-Added Discussed the OAA test in more detail Offered Value-Added Incentives Reward ProgramIndividual Student Meetings Reviewed previous year’s scores with student Identified strengths and weaknesses on previous test Had student set personal goals for improvement
  • 39. Student Achievement Report Student Name ______________________ The following symbols will be used to show student ability. + Above Proficient *Proficient - Below Proficient 3rd 4th 5th Reading OAA NCE Score _____________________Acquisition of Reading Process Information Text Literary TextVocabulary
  • 40. READING REPORTStudent Grade Score R-AV R-RP R-IT R-LTAlexa 3 465 + + + *Vincent 3 411 - * + -Paige 3 432 + * * + Reading Key R-AV: Acquisition Vocabulary + Above Proficient R-RP: Reading Process * Near Proficient R-IT: Informational Text - Below Proficient R-LT: Literary Text
  • 41. Student Value-Added Chart Student Name: Vincent Grade: 4 Teacher: Neikamp The following symbols will be used to show ability in each content standard section: + Above Proficient * Near Proficient - Below Proficient 3rd Grade Reading OAA Score : 411 Acquisition of Reading Process Informational Literary Text Vocabulary Text - * + - 3rd Grade Math OAA Score: 436 Measurement Number Patterns, Data, Geometry, Sense, Functions, Analysis, Spatial Sense Operations Algebra Probability * * - * *
  • 42. ConclusionAt all levels, collaboration is thekey to using data successfully andpositively impacting studentgrowth.
  • 43. Questions
  • 44. Bloom-Carroll Local School District Superintendent Lynn LandisStarr Martin Cindy FreemanCurriculum Director PrincipalBloom-Carroll Local Schools Bloom-Carroll Intermediate Schoolsmartin@bloomcarroll.com cfreeman@bloomcarroll.comMelissa Ward6th Grade Math TeacherBloom-Carroll Middle Schoolmward@bloomcarroll.com

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