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    Digital destinations  in history syllabus working Digital destinations in history syllabus working Document Transcript

    • New York City Department of EducationOffice of Educational TechnologyMadeline Taub-Chan, Community Superintendent CSD 24 (Acting)Jeannette Reed, Community Superintendent, CSD 28Winnie Bracco, Technology Innovation Managerhttp://www.oitqueens.comhttp://oitqblogs.com71437503829050<br /> <br />82867504114800828675041148008286750411480082867504114800<br />8286750411480082867504114800ACKNOWLEDGMENTS<br />Office of Educational Technology - Queens Team <br />Winnie Bracco, Technology Innovation Manager<br />
      • Phyllis Berkowitz, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Wayne Demacque, Supervising Instructional Technology Technician
      • Kelly Gallagher, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Richard Gross, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Kin Fung Leung, Supervising Instructional Technology Technician
      • Frances Newsom-Lang, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Frances O’Neill, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Ellen Phillips, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Kathleen Roberts, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Robert Sweeney, Instructional Technology Specialist
      • Michael Swirsky, Instructional Technology Specialist
      This syllabus was created by the OET Queens Team under the direction of Winnie Bracco, Technology Innovation Manager, and made possible by Title IID funds. <br />Contact Information<br />Winnie Bracco – wbracco@schools.nyc.gov<br />Frances O’Neill – foneill@schools.nyc.gov<br /> <br />Table of Contents<br />
      • TopicPage Course Syllabus, Description, Field Experiences4-5Course Goals and Focus6Course Texts6Course Requirements6Attendance Policies7 Session Description, Objectives and Expectations7-12 Standards Addressed13 New York City Social Studies Units and Essential questions: Grades 3-814 Global History and Geography17
      Digital Destinations In History S Y L L A B U S<br />Winnie Bracco Office of Educational TechnologyTechnology Innovation Manager WBracco@schools.nyc.gov <br />Instructional Technology Specialists:Frances O’NeillFrances Newsom-Langfoneill@schools.nyc.govfnewsomlang@schools.nyc.govPublic Schools  (Dist 24)IS 5, PS 12, PS 14, PS 19, IS 61, IS 73, IS 77, IS 89, PS 91, IS 93, IS 125, PS 153, Grover Cleveland High School, Newtown High School, Queens Vocational High SchoolPublic Schools  (Dist 28)PS 30, PS 54, IS 72, IS 144, IS 157, IS 217, Queens Academy High School, Forest Hills High School, Jamaica High SchoolNon-Public SchoolsSt. Raphael School, Resurrection Ascension School, Sacred Heart School, Razi School, St. John Lutheran School, Redeemer Lutheran School, Martin Luther High School, Bnos Malka Academy, Bais Yaakov Academy, Tiferes Torah Institute, Macon Academy, Our Lady of Mercy School, Al-Manoor School, Al-Iman School, Shaaraei Zion Ohel Bracha School, Our Lady of Sorrows School, St. Adalbert School, Yesheiva Tifereth Moshe School, Yeshivat Our Haim School, and St Nicholas of Tolentine School.<br />All workshops will be held at 82-01 Rockaway Boulevard Room 201 B or C unless otherwise noted. It is your responsibility to find out the locations of the workshops! <br />Participation Option A – Saturday Face to Face SessionsWorkshopDateHoursProtraxx CodesOrientation Meeting9/21 or 9/22 PM4 PM to 6 PMPBL Training (4 days total)*8/31 , *9/1 or 9/28 , 9/29, 11/2, and 11/38:00- 3:008/31, 9/1Elementary 051-10-035-629Middle School 051-10-035-632High School: 051-10-035-633Online Environments11/68:00- 3:00Google Tools12/118:00- 3:00Google Tools Day 21/88:00- 3:00Podcasting2/128:00- 3:00Graphic Novels3/268:00- 3:00Mini Share Out5/148:00- 3:00Share Fair6/04 or 6/118:00- 3:00<br />
      • Location: 45-18 Court Square, Room 252, Long Island City, NY Time: 9 am – 3 pm PBL
      • Training 2 days are mandatory for per session
      Participation Option B – Online Sessions + 3 Face to Face WorkshopsWorkshopDateHoursProtraxx CodesOrientation Meeting 9/21 or 9/224 PM to 6 PMPBL Training (4 days total)*8/31 ,* 9/1 or 9/21 , 9/22, 11/2, and 11/38:00- 3:008/31, 9/1Elementary 051-10-035-629Middle School 051-10-035-632High School: 051-10-035-633Mini Share Out5/14Share Fair5/14<br />
      • Location: 45-18 Court Square, Room 252, Long Island City, NY Time: 9 am – 3 pm
      • PBL Training 2 days are mandatory for per session
      COURSE DESCRIPTION<br />The Title IID “Digital Destinations in History” (DDIH) grant is an intensive professional development program that focuses on improving student achievement in ELA by integrating technology into the Social Studies curriculum.  DDIH serves the goals of the Enhancing Education Through Technology theme, " Technology Infusion into Instruction through Professional Development" , by empowering educators to engage students in interdisciplinary projects that develop writing, critical thinking and problem-solving skills and to train teachers to use technology as both an instructional tool for the Social Studies curriculum and to reinforce fundamental ELA skills.  <br /> <br />FIELD EXPERIENCE Each participant is required to (1) create products that are specifically designed to meet the diverse needs of students in their classrooms, (2) use those products with their students, (3) assess student understanding of content, (4) record evidence of student learning through photographs and video, (5) bring that evidence back to the learning community, (6) share both the evidence and their experience with the colleagues in the course, (7) reflect and record their findings in a blog, (8) turnkey their skills with teachers in their school communities. <br />PREREQUISITEParticipants from specific grant schools must be selected by their principals to attend this course. <br />CONCEPTUAL FRAMEWORK Diversity: The Office of Educational Technology (Queens) OETQ is dedicated to reaching a diversity of learners through a wide variety of delivery methods, offering modality options and expanding access by reducing geographic and time barriers. By using a wide variety of content material, formats, and instructional strategies, participants learn to create and customize instructional experiences to meet the specific needs of their students. <br />Technology: Technology provides one of the most efficient means of engaging students, empowering teachers and providing content in the 21st century.  <br />Field Relations: The OETQ Instructional Technology Specialists are highly qualified New York City public school K-12 teachers that can bring practical classroom management techniques,  instructional technology methodologies and curriculum integration to make a difference in our classrooms.  <br />COURSE GOALS This course explores the use of technology to enhance English Language Arts instruction in Social Studies.  The program aims to train teachers to use technology as both an instructional tool for the Social Studies curriculum and as a way to reinforce ELA skills. <br />COURSE FOCUSThe content and activities of this course provide the learner with the opportunity: * Develop an appreciation for technology as a tool to teach and learn.* Develop an understanding of and a commitment to serving diverse populations* Develop an understanding of the power of technology to differentiate instruction through students' learning modalities.* Develop an image of oneself as a learner, teacher and leader.<br />COURSE TEXTS THAT WILL BE SUPPLIED AND DISCUSSEDSessionTitleAuthorPub. Date. Project Based LearningPBL Starter KitBuck Institute for Education2009BloggingWeb Literacy for Educators Alan November2008Blogging" Raising a Digital Child - A Digital Citizenship Handbook for Parents" Mike Ribble2009Podcasting" Student-Powered Podcasting - Teaching for 21st Century Literacy" Christopher Shamburg2009Graphic Novels" Writing Your Own Graphic Novel" Natalie Rosinsky2010<br />JOURNAL ARTICLES THAT WILL BE SUPPLIED AND DISCUSSEDSESSION: Graphic Novels“Using Student-Generated Comic Books in the Classroom" T. Morrison, G. Bryan and George W. Chilcoat, Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy 45:8, May 2002" Graphic Novel Vocabulary" Verizon Foundation, readwritethink.org<br />  <br />COURSE REQUIREMENTS1Participants must be active SS/ELA classroom teachers or Collaborative Team Teaching teachers in grant-specific public and non-public schools.2Participants must have principal approval to attend this course as a representative of the grant school.3Participants must attend sessions and complete all projects by the end of the course.4Participants must turnkey their training to their school community and inquiry team upon request. 5If possible, participants should bring a school laptop to each session.  Specific software will be provided.<br />CLASS ATTENDANCE and POLICIESThis course is cumulative, building on each skill as its foundation is created.  Therefore, 100% attendance is mandatory. <br />KEYSTONE ASSIGNMENTS Each student will develop the following specific products<br />
      • Project Based Learning- BIE Buck Institute for Education
      • Online Web Environments
      • Blogging
      • Google Tools
      • Podcasting
      • Graphic Novels
      ACADEMIC INTEGRITY AND PLAGIARISM Students are responsible for the honest completion and representation of their work, for appropriate citations of sources, and respect for others’ academic endeavors. <br />
      • SESSION DESCRIPTION, OBJECTIVES AND EXPECTATIONSSessionsTopicsParticipants Will:ExpectationsSession 1Project Based LearningBIEProject Based Learning in the Classroom- Mandatory (4 workshops)What is Project Based What is the Driving QuestionLearningWhyHow Be able to create Project Based Learning Projects for the classroom using relevant curriculum while integrating technology.Be able to use the New York Social Studies Scope and Sequence to develop driving questions.To understand the purpose of PBL.To understand the process involved in creating relevant PBL’s for your classroom. Follow-Up to Today's SessionUse the New York Social Studies Scope and Sequence to establish a driving question for planning the Project Based Learning project.Preparation for the Next SessionThink about the driving question and what you want the students to accomplish.Session 2Orientation MeetingFace to Face Meeting- MandatoryMeet Office of Educational Technology StaffGrant GoalsResponsibilitiesRequired Dates“I have Read it Statement”Web presencesGrant EvaluatorsMandatory Surveys for Participants, Students, WorkshopsMeet your school’s Instructional Specialist.Understand the Goals of the Grant.Understand what your responsibilities as a participant of the Digital Destinations in History Grant. Receive dates for Face to Face Meetings and workshops.Sign the “I have Read It Statement.Become familiar with the different websites used by the Grant. Meet Grant Evaluators and understand their purpose.Understand the required completion of participant and student surveys. Follow-Up on Today's SessionMeet and take note of your Instructional Specialist. Start thinking of ways your Instructional Specialist may be of assistance with integrating technology.  Preparation for the Next SessionMake an appointment with your specific Instructional Specialist. Take contact information. Session 3Using Blogs to Enhance Social Studies InstructionBlogs DefinedCreating Blog Posts with Images, Videos, etc. Aris ConnectBe able to create your own blog that you will be able to use tomorrow with your students with relevant Social Studies curriculum.Be comfortable posting a comment to a colleague’s blog.Be able to post an assignment to your blog, add an image, embed a link and a video, and moderate students' comments on your blog. Explore ARIS Connect and participate in an online community. Follow-Up on Today's SessionCreate a blog post assignment for your students based on relevant Social Studies curriculum. Students will write their responses to the assignment on the blog to be shared out at the beginning of the next session. .  Preparation for the Next SessionDetermine what historical topic you will be teaching between now and our next session, which will be used in a google map. Build upon your driving question created during the Project Based Learning workshops. Session 4Online EnvironmentsOnline EnvironmentsNYPL- New York Public LibraryYolinkThinkfinityReceive a New York Public Library Card (different than a borough library card)Be able to use all resources on the New York Public Library site ( Gale resources, etc.)Be comfortable with Yolink.Be comfortable with using Thinkfinity. Follow-Up on Today's SessionFind resources on the sites to use in your Google Map. .  Preparation for the Next SessionUsing the NYS Social Studies Scope and Sequence build upon your driving question created during the Project Based Learning workshops and look for resources on the sites introduced at this session. Session 5Google Tools to Enhance Social Studies InstructionDay OneGoogle ToolsUsing NYS Social Studies Scope and Sequence to focus driving question.Sample Google MapGoogle Search ToolsBuilding a Google MapAdding HyperlinksAdding ImagesChanging PlacemarksAdding Animated GifsEmbedding VideoAdding CollaboratorsBe able to use the NYS Social Studies Scope and Sequence to focus driving question. This driving question will focus on an event in history, with locations. Be able to use Google Tools to find research to be added to your Google Map. Using Google Search, Timeline, Wonder Wheel, etc. Be able to build a Google Map with hyperlinks, images, place marks, and different locations. Be able to add OET Queens as a collaborator as well as students. Be able to search User Created Maps on related topics. Follow-Up on Today’s SessionFinish working on your Google map. Apply what you've learned by teaching your students about Google tools.  Comment on your experience working with your students to the blog. Preparation for the Next SessionThink of documents you would add to your Google Map.Session 6Using Google Tools to Enhance Social Studies InstructionDay TwoGoogle ToolsGoogle DocumentsGoogle SpreadsheetsGoogle PresentationsGoogle FormsUploading and Creating a Google DocumentHyper-linking Documents to a Google MapBe able to upload and create a Google document, spreadsheet, and form. Be able to hyperlink to the participant Google Map. Use the NYS Social Studies Scope and Sequence to create curriculum relevant Google Documents to add to participant Google Maps. Follow-Up on Today’s SessionFinish working on your Google map. Apply what you've learned to add relevant Google documents. Comment on your experience working with your students to the blog. Preparation for the Next SessionDetermine what historical topic you will be teaching between now and our next session.  Have your students create a historical creative writing piece.Session 7Using Podcasting to Enhance Social Studies Instruction Introduction to PodcastingCreating a script groupAdding musicUsing the NYS Social Studies Scope and Sequence to identify a topicFinalizing your storyboardBe able to define podcasts.Be able to plan for a podcasting project with students.Use the NYS Scope and Sequence to create assignments for students with relevant curriculum. Use student writing to create a storyboard to create podcasts. Follow-Up on Today’s SessionApply what you learned today by teaching your students how to create a podcast.Embed samples of student-created podcasts on the course Google Map. Preparation for the Next SessionHave your students create a historical creative writing piece about the event or time period.  They can choose to write a first person or third person narrative.  The first person narrative can consist of taking on the role of someone during that time period (like a memoir or journal entry).  The third person narrative might be about reporting on a historical event.Session 8Using Graphic Novels to Enhance Social Studies InstructionDefinition of Graphic NovelWhat is the story behind the image?Turning your students’ writing into a Graphic NovelGathering ImagesUsing Comic Life software to create a Graphic NovelUnderstand the purpose of Graphic Novels.Be able to tell a story using images.Be able to use student writing to create a Graphic Novel.Be able to use different resources to find images.Be able to use Comic Life software to create a Graphic NovelFollow-Up on Today’s SessionFinish your graphic novel. Have your students create their own graphic novels.Preparation for the Next SessionStart collecting student projects. Next session will be a Mini Share Out. You will present your student work at a gallery walk. Session 9Mini Share OutSharing Student Projects with other ParticipantsBe able to discuss projects and technology tools integrated into projects. Be able to share the process with the other participants. Follow-Up on Today’s SessionThink of the other projects that were presented. Which ones would you like to use in your classroom. Comment to the blog. Preparation for the Next SessionStart thinking about which students you will bring to the next session which is the Share Fair. The Share Fair will be a “project” fair where the students can discuss their project and celebrate participating in the Title II D, Digital Destinations in History Grant program. Session 10Share FairSharing student projects with other teachers, students, and parentsBe able to discuss projects and listen to students discuss the process involved in participating in their projects.
      STANDARDS ADDRESSED NYS English Language Arts Standards<br />NYS ELAStandard 1Information and Understanding, Informational Text, Organizing Data, Conducting  Research, Speaking and Writing Persuasive Commentary                                          NYS ELAStandard 2Literary Response and Interpretation, Recognize the Impact of Rhythm and Rhyme in PoemsNYS ELAStandard 3Critical Analysis and Evaluation, Persuasive Writing and SpeakingNYS ELAStandard 4Social Interaction, share reading experience and provide feedback by asking questions             <br />NYS Social Studies Standards <br />NYS SSStandard 1History of the US and NY – use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, development and turning points in the history of the United States and New York.NYS SSStandard 2World History – use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate understanding of major ideas, eras, themes, development and turning points in world history and examine the board sweep of history from a variety of perspectives. NYS SSStandard 3Geography – use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate understanding to include distribution of people, places and environments over the Earth’s surface.NYS SSStandard 5Civics – use a variety of intellectual skills to demonstrate understanding of governments, US systems and other nations, the US Constitution and basic civic values of American constitutional democracy and the roles, rights and responsibilities of citizenship. <br /> <br />Professional Teaching Standards (PTS) <br />1Creating and maintaining effective environments for student learning.2Engaging and supporting all students in learning.3Developing as a professional educator.<br /> <br />Other Standards Addressed <br />MSIT 2Use an understanding of learners and learning and apply instructional design model in a curriculum development project.AECT 2Candidates demonstrate the knowledge, skills, and dispositions to develop instructional materials and experiences using print, audiovisual, computer-based, and integrated technologiesAECT 5Candidates demonstrate knowledge, skills, and dispositions to evaluate the adequacy of instruction and learning by applying principles of problem analysis, criterion-referenced measurement, formative and summative evaluation, and long-range planning.TS 01Use computer-based productivity tools to develop instructional materials that integrate technology to meet the target needs of all students. TS 02Apply principles of instructional system design to create instructional materials that integrate technology to meet the target needs of diverse student populations.<br /> <br /> <br />New York City Social Studies Scope and Sequence<br />Grades 3-8 and Global History and Geography<br />New York City Social Studies Scope and SequenceGradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question3September – OctoberIntroduction to World Geography and World CommunitiesWhat are the important features of communities throughout the world?3November - JuneCase Studies of a Community in Africa, Asia, South America, The Caribbean, Middle East, Europe, Southeast Asia, or AustraliaHow do culture, history, geography, people, and government shape the development of a community?GradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question4September – Mid-OctoberNative Americans: First Inhabitants of New York StateHow did Native Americans influence the development of New York?4Mid-October – NovemberThree Worlds MeetHow did three diverse cultures interact and affect each other?4December – JanuaryColonial and Revolutionary PeriodsHow did the American Revolution affect lives in New York?4February – Mid-MarchThe New NationWhat does it mean to be free?4Mid-March – AprilGrowth and ExpansionWhat was the effect of industrial growth and increased immigration on New York?4May – JuneLocal and State GovernmentWhat is the relationship between governments and individuals?<br />New York City Social Studies Scope and SequenceGradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question5September – OctoberGeography and Early Peoples of the Western HemisphereHow did geography influence the development of the Western Hemisphere?5NovemberThe United StatesHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a nation?5December – Mid-FebruaryLatin AmericaHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a region?5Mid-February – AprilCanadaHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a nation?5May – JuneWestern Hemisphere TodayHow do nations meet the challenges of modern living?<br />New York City Social Studies Scope and SequenceGradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question6September – OctoberGeography and Early Peoples of the Eastern HemisphereHow did geography influence the development of the Eastern Hemisphere?6November – DecemberMiddle EastHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a continent?6January – FebruaryAfricaHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a continent?6March - AprilAsiaHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a continent?6May – JuneEuropeHow do geography, economics, people, and key events connect to shape a region?<br />New York City Social Studies Scope and SequenceGradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question7SeptemberEarly Encounters: Native Americans and ExplorersWhat was the impact of European exploration on the Americas’ land and people?7October – NovemberColonial America and The American RevolutionHow did the development of the colonies lead to rebellion?7December – JanuaryA New NationHow did the new nation respond to independence?7February – MarchA Nation GrowsWhat were the causes and effects of national growth?7April – JuneCivil War and ReconstructionHow do issues of power, wealth and morality influence war?<br />New York City Social Studies Scope and SequenceGradeMonth(s)UnitEssential Question8September – OctoberAn Industrial SocietyHow did industrialization and immigration change the face of American life?8NovemberThe Progressive MovementHow do people effect change and reform?8December – JanuaryThe United States as an Expansionist NationHow does a nation balance its own needs with the needs of the world?8January – Mid-FebruaryThe United States Between WarsHow does a nation respond to economic changes?8Mid-February – MarchThe United States Assumes Worldwide ResponsibilitiesHow do competing views of power and morality lead to global conflict?8April – JuneFrom World War II to the Present: The Changing Nature of the American PeopleHow has America reacted to the challenges of the modern world?<br />Global History and GeographyUnitEssential QuestionsUnit 1: Ancient World: Civilizations and Religions (4000 BC – 500 AD)Early PeoplesNeolithic Revolution and early river civilizations.Classical civilizationsThe rise and fall of great empiresThe emergence and spread of belief systems.How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?What defines a turning point?To what extent is life a constant struggle between continuity and change?Why do civilizations rise and fall?After it falls, what impact does a civilization have on history?How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable?Do belief systems unite or divide people?How do movements of people and ideas affect people, places and regions?Unit 2: Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter (500 – 1200)Gupta Empire (320-550 AD)Tang and Song Dynasty (618-1126 AD)Byzantine Empire (330-1453 AD)Early RussiaThe spread of Islam to Europe, Asia and AfricaMedieval Europe (500-1400)CrusadeWhy do civilization rise and fall?After it falls, what impact does a civilization have on history?Do belief systems unite or divide people?How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?To what extent is life a struggle between continuity and change?How do movements of people and ideas affect people, places and regions?How are the concepts of time and place vital to the understanding of history?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?How does the individual influence world events?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable?Unit 3: Global Interactions (1200 – 1650)Early Japanese history and feudalism.The rise and fall of the Mongols and their impact on Eurasia.Global trade and interactions.Rise and fall of African civilizations: Ghana, Mali, Axum, and Songhai empiresSocial, economic, and political impacts of the plague on Eurasia and Africa.Renaissance and Counter Reformation.The rise and impact of European nation-states/decline of feudalism.How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?How do movements of people and ideas affect people, places and regions?To what extent is life a struggle between continuity and change?Why do civilization rise and fall?After it falls, what impact does a civilization have on history?How does the individual influence world events?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?To what extent do the concepts of justice and human rights differ across time and place?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable? Do belief systems unite or divide people?What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?Unit 4: The First Global Age (1450-1770)The Ming Dynasty (1368-1644)The impact of the Ottoman Empire on the Middle East and EuropeSpain and Portugal on the eve of the encounterThe rise of Mesoamerican empires: Aztecs and Incan empires before 1500The encounter between Europeans and the peoples of Africa, the Americas, and Asia.Political Ideologies: global absolutismThe response to absolutism: The rise of parliamentary democracy in EnglandHow do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?How does the individual influence world events?What defines a turning point?Why do civilization rise and fall?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable? What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?After it falls, what impact does a civilization have on history?How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?To what extent do the concepts of justice and human rights differ across time and place?Unit 5: An Age of Revolution (1750-1914)The Scientific RevolutionThe Enlightenment in EuropePolitical revolutionsThe reaction against revolutionary ideasLatin America: The failure of democracy and the search for stabilityGlobal nationalismEconomic and social revolutionsImperialismWhat defines a turning point?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?How does the individual influence world events?Does on-going scholarship change our worldview?To what extent is life a struggle between continuity and change?How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?To what extent do the concepts of justice and human rights differ across time and place?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable? Do belief systems unite or divide people?Why do civilization rise and fall?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?Unit 6: A Half Century of Crisis and Achievement (100- 1945)World War IRevolution and change in Russia – causes and impactsBetween the warsWorld War II – causes and impactHow do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable? What defines a turning point?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?How does the individual influence world events?How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?To what extent do the concepts of justice and human rights differ across time and place?Unit 7: the 20th Century Since 1945Cold War balance of powerRole of the United NationsEconomic issues in the Cold War and Post –Cold War eraChinese Communist RevolutionCollapse of European imperialismConflicts and change in the Middle EastCollapse of communism and the breakup of the Soviet UnionPolitical and economic change in Latin AmericaHow does technological change affect people, places and regions?What assumptions do different groups hold about power, authority, governance and law?How do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?To what extent do the concepts of justice and human rights differ across time and place?Are conflicts between nations and/or people inevitable? How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?What defines a turning point?How does the individual influence world events?Do belief systems unite or divide people?After it falls, what impact does a civilization have on history?To what extent is life a struggle between continuity and change?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?Unit 8: Global Connections and InteractionsSocial and political patterns and changeEconomic issuesThe environment and sustainabilityScience and technologyHow do physical and human geography affect people, places and regions?How do the movements of people and ideas (cultural diffusion) affect world history?To what extent is life a struggle between continuity and change?How does technological change affect people, places and regions?How are economic systems structured to meet the needs and wants of different societies?What impact do regional and global trade networks have on world cultures?<br />