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STILL OPEN ENDED

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"A research poster presented as part of the Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries project at the Research Sharing Event in Berlin, 15th July 2014. For more see …

"A research poster presented as part of the Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries project at the Research Sharing Event in Berlin, 15th July 2014. For more see http://www.opendataresearch.org/emergingimpacts/"

Published in: Government & Nonprofit

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  • 1. CONTEXT National policies mandate open data and the use of data by local governments for planning and monitoring METHODS - Public meetings - Surveys - In-depth interviews ! ! FINDINGS - Inadequate methodology and skills for collection - Lack of standard templates and formats within and across departments - Formats geared towards infrastructure and not services - Reluctance to share data KEY PROBLEM - Lack of high quality data for municipal administration - Poor capacity of Chennai’s local government the Corporation of Chennai (CoC) to collect and use data for public service delivery - Fragmented governance landscape CONCLUSIONS - Disconnect between policy and local context. Open data policies assume existence of data and the capacity to manage it. - In reality, the quality of data is poor and local governments are not equipped to collect and use data for governance. - In addition, public agencies are not inclined to share data amongst each other and with the public. ! ! RECOMMENDATIONS - Improve the capacity of the CoC to articulate outcomes, and align outputs and institute robust monitoring mechanisms. - Scope for involvement of intermediaries to embed this capacity within the CoC. STILL OPEN ENDED open data policies do not take into account the current state of data, data management practises and the capacities of public agencies EVIDENCE • water: Existing data is informative, but presented without metadata that is necessary for full understanding • sanitation:Data on public toilets is inaccurate and cannot be used for planning and monitoring. • health: Data collected on a daily and weekly basis does not go into comprehensive and proactive planning of health intervention www.opendataresearch.org Credits The funding for this work has been provided through the World Wide Web Foundation 'Exploring the Emerging Impacts of Open Data in Developing Countries' research project, supported by grant 107075 from Canada’s International Development Research Centre (web.idrc.ca). Find out more at www.opendataresearch.org/emergingimpacts This%work%is%licensed%under%a%Crea2ve%Commons%A6ribu2on%4.0%Interna2onal%License. CHENNAI