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One Voice presentation by David Holman

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  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Society often puts a great deal of measure and weight on the achievement of it’s athletes. There is often a direct correlation between how we view ourselves and the achievements in a sports arena. One need not look any further then a simple hockey rivalry between two cities say, Toronto and Montreal to see the importance of sport to the
    During the cold war the Olympic Games were seen as an opportunity to showcase superiority and strength, to measure East vs. West, Capitalism vs. Communism, the United States vs. the Soviet Union. The battle for medals are paramount and are counted to determine what nation is superior? Many athletes will go to any length to earn a place in this arena of adoration. will go as far as to inject themselves with human growth hormones, anabolic steroids and animal testosterone.
    The Olympics are also used as a way to send social and political messages. The Israeli massacre at the 72 Munich Olympics, the boycotts of the 76 through 84 games, Jessie Owens’ dispelling Hitler’s views of “White Superiority” in Berlin in 1936.
    So what message is being sent, when a society doesn’t acknowledge and adorn the accomplishments of an Olympic hero simply because they have a disability? The message is clear, you don’t count and either do we count the medals around your neck. It’s true, the medals won by people with disability are not counted in the overall “country medal count” at the Olympic games.
    How can we expect our society to integrate our workplaces with people with disability when we continue to send the message “you don’t count”?
    Canada always seems to like to compare ourselves to our neighbors to the south. We like to see ourselves as similar but very different. We like to be set apart, we hate to be mistaken for an American when visiting foreign lands, we wear our flag on our back packs and coats so we are not confused or mistaken to be from the United States. We see ourselves as having more enlightened views our society as more tolerant. On many fronts this may or may not be true, after all we are about 1/10th the size of the United State on a population scale.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Employer Outreach - Strategies to develop better relationships with employers. ONE VOICE – Presentation May 27th , 2010
    • 2. Employment Models
    • 3. Social Services Employment Programs vs. Employment Agency Models ODSP/Social Service Models – Job Seeker determined? – Outcome based funding - payment for placement (13 weeks) continual payments for retention – Disability focused? – Employer relevance? – Service provider – disability expertise vs. employer/job matching proficiency – Marketing – “Are you a person with a disability looking for work? We can help.”
    • 4. Social Services Employment Programs vs. Employment Agency Models Employment Agency Model – Employer based income - payment for successful placement/ongoing payments for longevity of temporary help – Employer determined – Employer relevance – Employment Agency – employer expertise/skill matching proficiency – Continual Employer Relationship – Marketing – “We currently have openings for…if you possess these skills”
    • 5. Societal and Employer Attitudes Why Stereotypes and Myths regarding Disability remain prevalent in Society.
    • 6. The Word Disability
    • 7. Dis = Latin prefix meaning “apart,” “separated,” “negative” or “reversing force”, causing, or tending to cause deprivation. Ability = a general word for power, talent, capability, proficiency, expertise, skill, competence, aptitude. Dissecting Disability Disability = “separated from or lack of talent, power, expertise, capability, skill, competence or aptitude.”
    • 8. Do we as a society allow and continue to perpetuate the myths and stereotypes of disability? A Sample
    • 9. Athens Olympic Games 2004 A “Telling Tale” of Two Olympic Athletes Perdita Felicien Chantal Petitclerc
    • 10. In 2004 Canada’s Governing body of Amateur Sport, “Athletics’ Canada” viewed the accomplishments of these two women as equal.
    • 11. Named “co-recipients” for Canada’s Female “Athlete of the Year” - 2004
    • 12. Here’s what each athlete accomplished at the Olympics to be recognized for such a prestigious award. Perdita fell in the final of the 100 metre hurdles and did not finish the race Chantal won 5 Gold Medals and Established 3 New World Records
    • 13. Chantal’s 5 Gold Medals & 3 World Records are arguably the single greatest athletic accomplishment in Canadian Amateur Sport.
    • 14. She should be a household name. Chantal should be one of the most celebrated athletes in this country. She should be inundated with endorsement opportunities.
    • 15. Why? She’s not. Because the verb used to describe Chantal by society is not athlete rather disabled.
    • 16. If we overlook the outstanding achievements of our International Athletes with disability, what does that mean for the “average” person with a disability? Studies show that “attitudinal barriers” are the number one issue facing a job seeker with disability
    • 17. But we have legislation designed to prevent discrimination… The CANADIAN HUMAN RIGHTS ACT - The Canadian Human Rights Act entitles all individuals to equal employment opportunities without regard to race or colour, national or ethnic origin, religion, age, family or marital status, sex (including pregnancy or childbirth), pardoned conviction, disability (either physical or mental or as the result of dependence on alcohol or drugs), or sexual orientation.
    • 18. Special Programs and Employment Equity The Canadian Human Rights Act allows for special programs designed to improve opportunities for groups that have been traditionally disadvantaged because of race, ethnic origin, age, sex, disability or other prohibited grounds of discrimination. As well, the Canadian Human Rights Commission audits employers and takes necessary action to ensure they comply with the Employment Equity Act, which is designed to improve job opportunities for four specific groups — women, Aboriginal people, members of visible minorities, and people with disabilities. …and then we make exceptions
    • 19. Strategies to Overcoming Employer Attitudinal Barriers.
    • 20. Over the last two years I have asked every employer that I have met with a question… “If I told you that I was a person with a disability what would you guess it to be?” Although most were very uncomfortable about answering this question 67 out of 69 all answered “some sort of mental health issue.” That’s 97%
    • 21. …approximately 55-65% of ODSP ES job seekers have invisible disabilities …on average then for every 60 out of 100 job seekers from an ODSP ES program interviewing with an employer…58 will be assumed to have “some sort of mental health issue”
    • 22. What then is society’s view of person’s with mental health issues? According to studies, the rate of unemployment for people with mental health issues ranges from 75% - 89%. Negative attitudes toward those with mental health issues play a significant role in the high unemployment. Studies indicate that employers need assistance to understand how to create supportive environments for persons with mental health issues and that others in the work environment hold negative attitudes toward persons with disabilities in general. According to the Ministry of Health and Long- Term Care’s paper “Mental Health – Making it Work” – the overall perception of mental health issue is not very positive
    • 23. Are programs and services designed to assist people with disabilities to find employment actually a disservice if the disability is invisible? If we have an understanding that employers have negative attitudes toward person’s with mental health issues and the employer will assume this to be the disability when none is apparent then potentially given the attitude toward mental health is it not a disservice?
    • 24. Under the Employment Standards Act an employer is not allowed to ask any questions about disability. An Employer however may ask if the job seeker requires any type of workplace accommodation. Given our mandate to best serve people with disabilities in obtaining employment how best do we overcome this major obstacle?
    • 25. A presentation by David Holman David Holman Consulting. Toronto, Ontario Canada, 416.573.4695