Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D.
Senior Research Scientist, OCLC Research
Chair of Excellence, Departmento de Biblioteconomí...
2
The Learning Black Market
“It’s like a taboo I guess with all teachers, they just all
say – you know, when they explain ...
3
Sources are overwhelmingly digital
(Connaway, Lanclos and Hood 2013)
4
“The majority of the population does not
use libraries to get information”
(Connaway, 2013)
5
6
“I find Google a lot easier…so many journals
come up and when you look at the first ten and
they just don’t make any sen...
7
The word “librarian” only
mentioned once in original
interviews by Emerging Stage
participants as a source of
informatio...
Digital Visitors and Residents:
What Motivates Engagement with the
Digital Information Environment?
Supported by
9
Understanding how learners
are engaging and learning
with technology can
influence improvements in
supporting and delive...
10
11
Convenience trumps all other reasons for
selecting and using a source
(Connaway, Lanclos, & Hood 2013)
Seeking Synchronicity: Evaluating Virtual
Reference Services from User, Non-User
and Librarian Perspectives
12
Librarians reported
that VRS were slightly
busier than FtF
services
Cyber Synergy: Seeking Sustainability
through Collaboration between Virtual
Reference and Social Q&A Sites
14
15
Provide evidence for modeling ways for
collaboration between Virtual Reference Services
(VRS) & Social Question & Answe...
16
17
Academic Honors and Appointments
18
19
20
21
25,900+ OCLC member
libraries, archives and
museums around the
world
OCLC Research
Leiden, Netherlands
Dublin, Ohio
30
San Mateo, California
12
3
23
Engaging the Library and Archive
Community for Shared Research,
Development, and Support
24
OCLC Research Collaborations
with LIS/iSchools
•Seeking Synchronicity & Cyber Synergy (Funded
by IMLS) Rutgers University
...
We Publish, Present, and Host
• We publish regularly, and provide a venue for interesting and
engaging presenters through ...
Activities and Themes
User Behavior Studies & Synthesis
Focus
• Study the behavior of library users to
determine their per...
Sexiest Jobs of the 21st Century
28
“Data scientists are very much in demand as
companies grapple with the challenge of ma...
Data Scientist Job Postings
29
“Access to information is ubiquitous
and information permeates all
aspects of our lives”
30
(Moran and Marchionini, 2012)
...
Create Your Perfect Job
• Know yourself
• Work hard
• Communicate
• Be creative
• Question
• Be flexible and adaptable
• P...
“…what makes someone hot isn’t
professionalism. It’s passion.”
32
(Patil , 2013)
References
Case, Donald O. 2012. Looking For Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking, Needs, and Behavior...
34
References
Connaway, L. S., & Radford, M. L. (2011). Seeking synchronicity: Revelations and recommendations for virtual...
35
References
Radford, Marie L., and Lynn Silipigni Connaway. 2005–2008a. Seeking synchronicity: Evaluating virtual refere...
Thank You!
©2014 OCLC. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Suggested attribut...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

It's Not Only What You Know: It's How You Use it to Achieve Your Professional Goals

175

Published on

Presented at the Royal School of Library and Information Science of Denmark, Open Lecture, March 21, 2014, Copenhagen, Denmark

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
175
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Research Questions:

    How can VRS become more collaborative, within and between libraries, & tap more effectively into librarians’ subject expertise?
    What can VRS learn from SQA to better serve users & attract potential users?
    How can we design systems & services within & between VRS and SQA for better quality and sustainability?
    In what ways can the Communities of Practice (Wenger, 1998, 2004) framework contribute to our understanding of collaboration barriers & opportunities in the VRS environment?

    Findings:

    -Difficult Questions
    Usually refer to another librarian
    Factors in addressing/referring difficult questions
    Content knowledge
    Shared professional standards
    Technological familiarity

    -Collaboration
    Believe other librarians are willing to collaborate
    Shared professional ideals and expertise
    Seen as value-added service
    FtF enables collaboration

    -SQA & Collaboration
    Librarians view SQA as:
    Less authoritative
    Less complex
    Less objective
    Not against collaborating with experts
    Willing to expand CoP to other experts if demonstrate
    Professional expertise
    Extensive knowledge
    Demonstrate professional expertise or extensive knowledge

    40% reported that overall reference volume was increasing
    Three-quarters of the librarians defined success as filling the user’s information need, as surmised when he/she expressed satisfaction/thanks during the interaction.
    a “nice feedback comment at the end” (L32)
    through emoticons: “There were lots of happy faces, so the user seemed pleased (L24).
    A major finding was that although the librarians viewed VRS as different from and superior to SQA services, they expressed a willingness to consult non-librarian experts.
    Librarians most often said that they would feel comfortable collaborating with professors, possibly because of a larger proportion of academic library participants, or because being a professor implies subject expertise, although they are not “card-carrying” members of the librarian CoP.
    One librarian stated: “[It] would be great to contact a history professor for a history question or social scientist for political information” (L16). None of the librarians mentioned doctors or lawyers, even though those were two areas where the participants mentioned lacking expertise.
    Most gave the impression that having confidence in expertise would involve: “some standards… that help [other experts] to provide that information in a way that librarians are used to providing that information” (L32).

    Marie L. Radford, Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Stephanie Mikitish, Mark Alpert, Chirag Shah, and Nicole A. Cooke. 2013. Conceptualizing Collaboration & Community in Virtual Reference & Social Q&A. Presented at CoLIS 8 Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, 19-22 August 2013, Copenhagen, (Denmark).
  • Images from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edinboro_University_of_Pennsylvania
    http://socolo-edu.org/region/photos.html
    http://publichealth.arizona.edu/prospective-students/visiting-campus
    http://www.collegemagazine.com/editorial/2225/Top-10-DTF-Colleges

    Ph. D. in Library Information Studies, the University of Wisconsin, Madison
    Master of Library Science degree, the University of Arizona
    Elementary Education/Media Specialist Certificate, Western State College
    Bachelor of Science degree in Library Science, Edinboro State University
  • Images from http://blog.meetmycollege.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/University-of-Denver-2.jpg
    http://mucampusdining.files.wordpress.com/2013/08/mizzou.jpg

    University of Missouri - Columbia, Columbia, MO, Winter 1993 to Summer 1995, Assistant Professor, School of Library and Informational Science
    University of Denver - Denver, CO, Fall 1995 to August 1999, Director and Associate Clinical Professor, Library and Information Services Department,
    University College
  • Transcript of "It's Not Only What You Know: It's How You Use it to Achieve Your Professional Goals"

    1. 1. Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D. Senior Research Scientist, OCLC Research Chair of Excellence, Departmento de Biblioteconomía y Documentación Universidad Carlos III de Madrid connawal@oclc.org @LynnConnaway It’s Not Only What You Know: It’s How You Use it to Achieve Your Professional Goals Open Lecture Royal School of Library and Information Science 21 March 2014
    2. 2. 2 The Learning Black Market “It’s like a taboo I guess with all teachers, they just all say – you know, when they explain the paper they always say, ‘Don’t use Wikipedia.’” (USU7, Female, Age 19, Political Science) (White & Connaway, 2011)
    3. 3. 3 Sources are overwhelmingly digital (Connaway, Lanclos and Hood 2013)
    4. 4. 4 “The majority of the population does not use libraries to get information” (Connaway, 2013)
    5. 5. 5
    6. 6. 6 “I find Google a lot easier…so many journals come up and when you look at the first ten and they just don’t make any sense. I, kind of, give up.” (USU7, Female Age 19)
    7. 7. 7 The word “librarian” only mentioned once in original interviews by Emerging Stage participants as a source of information One participant referred to “a lady in the library who helps you find things” (USU5, Male, Age 19, Systems Engineering)
    8. 8. Digital Visitors and Residents: What Motivates Engagement with the Digital Information Environment? Supported by
    9. 9. 9 Understanding how learners are engaging and learning with technology can influence improvements in supporting and delivering … - digital literacy - content and infrastructure - usability p. 3 Pole-charts by participants at a V&R event at the 2012 EDUCAUSE conference http://atkinsanthro.blogspot.com/2012/11/educause-2012-part- second.html
    10. 10. 10
    11. 11. 11 Convenience trumps all other reasons for selecting and using a source (Connaway, Lanclos, & Hood 2013)
    12. 12. Seeking Synchronicity: Evaluating Virtual Reference Services from User, Non-User and Librarian Perspectives 12
    13. 13. Librarians reported that VRS were slightly busier than FtF services
    14. 14. Cyber Synergy: Seeking Sustainability through Collaboration between Virtual Reference and Social Q&A Sites 14
    15. 15. 15 Provide evidence for modeling ways for collaboration between Virtual Reference Services (VRS) & Social Question & Answer Sites (SQA) (Radford et al., 2013)
    16. 16. 16
    17. 17. 17
    18. 18. Academic Honors and Appointments 18
    19. 19. 19
    20. 20. 20
    21. 21. 21 25,900+ OCLC member libraries, archives and museums around the world
    22. 22. OCLC Research Leiden, Netherlands Dublin, Ohio 30 San Mateo, California 12 3
    23. 23. 23 Engaging the Library and Archive Community for Shared Research, Development, and Support
    24. 24. 24
    25. 25. OCLC Research Collaborations with LIS/iSchools •Seeking Synchronicity & Cyber Synergy (Funded by IMLS) Rutgers University •Visiting Scholar & User-Centered Design of a Recommender System for a 'Universal' Library Catalogue (Funded by AHRC) University of Sheffield •Chair of Excellence. Universidad Carlos III de Madrid •Visiting Scholar. Royal School of LIS
    26. 26. We Publish, Present, and Host • We publish regularly, and provide a venue for interesting and engaging presenters through our distinguished speakers series.
    27. 27. Activities and Themes User Behavior Studies & Synthesis Focus • Study the behavior of library users to determine their perceptions and information usage habits of a variety of reference services. • Help libraries calibrate their services around a completely new set of user expectations shaped by consumer technologies. Goals • Provide the library community with behavioral evidence on users' perceptions, habits and requirements • Identify and share recommendations on how to better serve library users' needs now and in the future. • Encourage design of future library services to be all about the user. Our efforts in this theme are amplified by strategic partnerships.
    28. 28. Sexiest Jobs of the 21st Century 28 “Data scientists are very much in demand as companies grapple with the challenge of making valuable discoveries from Big Data. They’re often exotic, coming from data-oriented scientific backgrounds rather than MBA programs. And they tend to be mavericks, moving between business and IT colleagues and challenging the perspectives of both.” Patil , 2013
    29. 29. Data Scientist Job Postings 29
    30. 30. “Access to information is ubiquitous and information permeates all aspects of our lives” 30 (Moran and Marchionini, 2012) Microsoft ClipArt
    31. 31. Create Your Perfect Job • Know yourself • Work hard • Communicate • Be creative • Question • Be flexible and adaptable • Prove your capabilities • Promote/sell yourself • Network Biblioteket Kulturværftet, Helsingor • Be passionate 31
    32. 32. “…what makes someone hot isn’t professionalism. It’s passion.” 32 (Patil , 2013)
    33. 33. References Case, Donald O. 2012. Looking For Information: A Survey of Research on Information Seeking, Needs, and Behavior. Bingley: Emerald. Connaway, L. S. 2013. “Meeting the expectations of the community: The engagement-centered library.” In J. Janes (Ed.), Library 2020: Today’s leading visionaries describe tomorrow’s library (pp. 83-88). Lanham, MD: Scarecrow Press. Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, Timothy J. Dickey, and Marie L. Radford. 2011. “’If it is too inconvenient I’m not going after it: Convenience as a critical factor in information-seeking behaviors. Library & Information Science Research 33, no. 3: 179-190. Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, Donna Lanclos, and Erin M. Hood. 2013. “I always stick with the first thing that comes up on Google…” Where people go for information, what they use, and why. Accepted for publication, EDUCAUSE Review Online. Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, Donna Lanclos, and Erin M. Hood. 2013. “I find Google a lot easier than going to the library website.” Imagine ways to innovate and inspire students to use the academic library. Proceedings of the Association of College & Research Libraries (ACRL) 2013 conference, April 10-13, 2013, Indianapolis, IN. http://www.ala.org/acrl/sites/ala.org.acrl/files/content/conferences/confsandpreconfs/2013/papers/Connaway_Google. pdf. Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, Timothy J. Dickey, and Marie L. Radford. 2011. “’If it is too inconvenient I’m not going after it: Convenience as a critical factor in information-seeking behaviors. Library & Information Science Research 33, no. 3: 179-190. 33
    34. 34. 34 References Connaway, L. S., & Radford, M. L. (2011). Seeking synchronicity: Revelations and recommendations for virtual reference. Dublin, OH: OCLC Research. [Available: http://www.oclc.org/reports/synchronicity/full.pdf] Connaway, Lynn Silipigni, David White, Donna Lanclos, and Alison Le Cornu. 2013. Visitors and residents: What motivates engagement with the digital information environment? Information Research 18, no. 1. http://informationr.net/ir/18-1/infres181.html. De Rosa, C. 2010. Perceptions of libraries: A report to the OCLC membership. Dublin, OH: OCLC Online Computer Library Center. "Libraries, MOOCs and online learning." 2014. OCLC: Worldwide, member-owned library cooperative. http://www.oclc.org Moran B.B., and Marchionini G. 2012. "Information professionals 2050: Educating the next generation of information professionals". Information Services and Use. 32 (3-4): 95-100. Patil, DJ. 2013. "HBR Blog Network." Harvard Business Review. http://blogs.hbr.org/2013/11/still-the-sexiest-profession- alive/ Radford, M. L., & Connaway, L. S. (2013). Not dead yet! A longitudinal study of query type and ready reference accuracy in live chat and IM reference. Library & Information Science Research, 35(1), 2-13. [Available: http://www.oclc.org/resources/research/publications/library/2012/radford-connaway-lisr.pdf] (Winner of the ALISE/Bohdan S. Wynar Research Paper Competition of the 2013 ALISE Awards)
    35. 35. 35 References Radford, Marie L., and Lynn Silipigni Connaway. 2005–2008a. Seeking synchronicity: Evaluating virtual reference services from user, non-user, and librarian perspectives. Funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/synchronicity/. Radford, Marie L., Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Stephanie Mikitish, Mark Alpert, Chirag Shah, and Nicole A. Cooke. 2013. Conceptualizing Collaboration & Community in Virtual Reference & Social Q&A. Presented at CoLIS 8 Conference on Conceptions of Library and Information Science, 19-22 August 2013, Copenhagen, (Denmark). Radford, M. L., Connaway, L. S., & Shah, C. (2011-2013). Cyber Synergy: Seeking sustainability through collaboration between virtual reference and social Q&A sites. Retrieved from: http://oclc.org/research/activities/synergy.html Saunders, Laura. 2012. Faculty perspectives on information literacy as a student learning outcome. The Journal of Academic Librarianship 38, no. 4 (2012): 231. White, David. 2008. Not “natives’”& “immigrants” but “visitors’ & “residents.” TALL Blog: Online Education with the University of Oxford, April 23, http://tallblog.conted.ox.ac.uk/index.php/2008/07/23/not-natives-immigrants-but-visitors- residents/. White, D., & Connaway, L. S. 2011. Visitors and residents: What motivates engagement with the digital information environment. Funded by JISC, OCLC, and Oxford University. http://www.oclc.org/research/activities/vandr/
    36. 36. Thank You! ©2014 OCLC. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Suggested attribution: “This work uses content from [presentation title] © OCLC, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/” Lynn Silipigni Connaway, Ph.D. connawal@oclc.org 36
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×