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Games and Playfulness for Communities

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Slides from a workshop I ran for the Department of Transport's (Western Australia) Travelsmart program, which promotes sustainable commuting.

Slides from a workshop I ran for the Department of Transport's (Western Australia) Travelsmart program, which promotes sustainable commuting.

Published in: Education

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Transcript

  • 1. Games and Playfulness for Communities Dr. Kate Raynes-Goldie
  • 2. Icebreaker game • What was fun? • What was not fun? • What would you change?
  • 3. Who am I? now that you’ve all met each other first off, been car free since 2007 (hurrah!) and a living smart facilitator, so this is close ot my heart been making community focused games since 2007, gentrification, gaming privacy and also teach game design and run workshops
  • 4. This morning • Community games intro • Examples of game-supported behavioral change • Play some games • Game debrief • Making our own games
  • 5. Questions please! left time for questions as we go
  • 6. What are community games?
  • 7. Big games Locative games Street games Urban games Pervasive games Alternate Reality Games thinking beyond video games as games
  • 8. exertion games and exergaming board games Phygital games social and casual games immersive and interactive theatre games for change
  • 9. Community focus • In communities • For communities • With communities • World as the game board
  • 10. Supporting behavioral change with games and play • Rewards • Spectacles • Simulations • Combination of one or more
  • 11. Some examples • Wide variety of genres, but more focus on physicality, community and accessibility • Playful experiences • More than just video games! Thinking like a game designer, inspiration from many sources games as games
  • 12. Rewards
  • 13. Why? • Gamification (game elements to make boring things fun) • Behavioral change uses game elements • Feedback, encouragement, progress, rewards
  • 14. My QuitBuddy
  • 15. Chromaroma • Uses Oyster card (like TransPerth card) • Collect and own places, like Foursquare • Rewards for various activities/ behaviours
  • 16. Simulations
  • 17. Why? • Get over initial hurdle • Empathy, an alternative perspective • Spectrum of realism
  • 18. Situation Rooms •
  • 19. Zombies, Run! zombie simulator other end of the spectrum obviously has rewards too combination rewards and simulation
  • 20. Gentrification: The Game combination spectacle and simulation
  • 21. Spectacles
  • 22. Why? • Get attention for message or cause • Accessible • Intriguing, gets pass cynicism
  • 23. No Pants Subway Ride • A social game of flouting conventions • viral spread of message • Agents, missions and an App
  • 24. Train Mafia combination spectacle and simulation
  • 25. Let’s play some games!
  • 26. Gargoyles • Fun? • Not fun? • What to change?
  • 27. Spaceteam • Fun? • Not fun? • What to change?
  • 28. A bit more on Gargoyles • Jaime Woo’s first game • No technology • Low entry barrier for creation and play • Spectacle and game similarly space team was created by one indie dev. obviously you need coding and game skills, but it isn’t a triple A game which have budgets in the millions.
  • 29. Making our own games • A game like Gargoyles or Spaceteam, but for promoting public transport? • Simulation, rewards, spectacle?
  • 30. Some tips to get you started • Start with experience, goal or story (rather than tech) • Work with stakeholders and communities
  • 31. Playtesting • Effective, fun games • Co-creating with stakeholders and communities
  • 32. Start making games • Game Design Workshop • Adapt existing games
  • 33. adapting existing games, being inspired by existing games
  • 34. Thinking like a game designer • Highly interdisciplinary • Kids in the playground • Is it really any different than writing, making music or filmmaking? a bit on my story
  • 35. “I am a game designer” (Schell 2008)
  • 36. Resources
  • 37. Ludocity.org • Free, open source pervasive games • Can be adapted
  • 38. Let’s Make Games • Perth-based • Workshops, events, Facebook group • Largely video game based: letsmakegames.org
  • 39. Playup Perth! • Free • Every 2 months • Next one this Saturday (March 1, 1pm in Fremantle: playupperth.eventbrite.com.au)
  • 40. Emotional Play • March 4, 6-9pm, FTI (Fremantle) • Workshop and lecture: emotionalplay.eventbrite.com.au
  • 41. Thanks! kate@atmosphereindustries.com atmosphereindustries.com @oceanpark