• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Cic plenary nov.10 2011 ocasi ed_en
 

Cic plenary nov.10 2011 ocasi ed_en

on

  • 1,369 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,369
Views on SlideShare
1,114
Embed Views
255

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
20
Comments
1

1 Embed 255

http://edforum.ocasi.org 255

Accessibility

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel

11 of 1 previous next

  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • how can I download the slides from this link?
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Cic plenary nov.10 2011 ocasi ed_en Cic plenary nov.10 2011 ocasi ed_en Presentation Transcript

    • Citizenship and Immigration CanadaOCASIExecutive Directors ForumNovember 10-11, 2011
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementPresentation Outline1. Context and Strategic Directions – Deborah Tunis, Director General of Integration2. Performance Measurement and iCAMS/iCARE – Umit Kiziltan, Director General of Research and Evaluation3. Settlement Program Data Analysis – Catherine Simard, Manager of Performance Management and Funding4. Grants and Contributions (Gs&Cs): Risk-Based Management of Relationships with Organizations – Wally Boxhill, Director of Integration and Program Management5. Managing Gs&Cs on the ground: Implementation – Veronica Barnes, Ontario Regional Director of Settlement, Intergovernmental Affairs and Multiculturalism. 2
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement 1. Context and Strategic DirectionsDeborah Tunis, Director General Integration 3
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementA Shared Vision “Welcoming and supporting newcomers to join in building vibrant communities and a prosperous Canada”.• Canada is a destination of choice• Immigration contributes to increased economic growth, innovation, entrepreneurship and competitiveness• The benefits of immigration are shared across Canada• Communities welcome and support newcomers• Immigrants participate to their full potential, economically and socially• The immigration system is trusted and valued• Social and humanitarian commitments are strengthened(Endorsed by Federal, Provincial and Territorial Ministers responsible for immigration, June 2010) 4
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementThe Context: A Changing EnvironmentWorld Events:• Shifts in global economy: rise of BRIC countries• Economic and political uncertainty in the US• Challenges in the European Union• Middle East’s unrest - Arab SpringIn Canada:• Back to Majority Government after 7 years of Minority• Significant shift in federal party politics• 5 Provincial, 2 Territorial Elections• Continued demographic shift … making the issue of immigration, settlement and integration, citizenship and multiculturalism more prominent than ever in Canada. 5
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement…and Canada is Becoming More Diverse Canada’s Visible Minority and Aboriginal Population 6
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementWhat Does This Mean for Us?• Immigration, multiculturalism and citizenship issues even more prominent• Pressure for greater labour market responsiveness• Competition for highly skilled immigrants• Ever increasing volumes (Temporary Foreign Workers, visitors, students)• Pressure to show increased efficiencies• 10.5 M refugees and 27.5 M internally displaced people in 2010 (UNHCR)• General support for diversity and multiculturalism, but challenges to social cohesion persist. 7
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementWhere to from Here?: CIC Program and Policy Areas (1/2)Identity Management and Security• Perimeter Action Plan; National Action plan to Combat Trafficking in Persons (part of C-56 Omnibus Crime Bill)Immigration Program• Policy options for the first multi-year levels plan; Further Ministerial Instructions; Point system changes for FSW and new regime for tradespersons; New Ph.D. stream; Pre-arrival assessment of credentials in selection process; Temporary Worker Program review; Family Class Program and Action Plan for Faster Family ReunificationRefugee and Asylum Policy• Expansion of resettlement program, regulations/rules/procedures for coming into force of Balances Refugee ReformCitizenship• Citizenship Modernization; Enhance civic knowledge, memory and pride among all Canadians; Improve language assessment of citizenship applicants: 30-day public comment period on the proposal to require applicants to furnish upfront evidence of language ability (http://www.gazette.gc.ca/rp-pr/p1/2011/2011-10-15/html/notice-avis-eng.html) 8
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementWhere to from Here?: CIC Program and Policy Areas (2/2)Settlement and Integration• Develop policy framework and options for language training• Complete the new Welcome to Canada• Finalize the overseas strategy• Assess the current governance and program suite for settlement• Strengthen performance measurement of settlement programming• Currently, an evaluation of the Multiculturalism Program is underway and will be completed at the end of the fiscal year. It will be reviewed with a focus on how best to implement recommendations to improve the program. 9
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementA Few “Big” Policy Questions for Settlement and Integration (1/2) Vision: Newcomers and citizens participate to their full potential in fostering an integrated society. • What measures would re-balance CIC’s policy and program efforts away from shorter-term settlement needs to foster longer-term, societal integration and address challenges such as cultural and religious diversity? • How can federal, provincial and municipal governments effectively coordinate their settlement services and engage employers and stakeholders, including the sector, in settlement and integration? 10
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementA Few “Big” Policy Questions for Settlement and Integration (2/2)• Citizenship and multiculturalism are critical to national - building: how can we best leverage them?• How can we make the most coherent, adaptable strategic investments in outcomes – for immigrants and for more established Canadians alike – to remove barriers to social inclusion?• How do we ensure that the processes and procedures we put in place for the management of our grants and contributions to maximise positive outcomes for newcomers? How we answer these questions will influence the future prosperity and cohesiveness of Canadian society. 11
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement 2. Performance Measurement and iCAMS/iCARE* Ümit Kiziltan, Director General Research and Evaluation* Immigration-Contribution Accountability Measurement System/Immigrant Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment. 12
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementPerformance Measurement: A Fundamental Building Block “You cannot manage what you cannot measure”.• A Government of Canada priority• What is it? How is it used? - Ongoing systematic collection, monitoring and reporting on a specific policy or program - Quality indicators and the use of those indicators are important to departmental management, and policy & program development - Guides decision making and supports evaluation - Fosters transparency and accountability. 13
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementPerformance Measurement at CIC• The department must demonstrate and report on: – The relevance, effectiveness and efficiency of settlement programs – An accountability framework including data capture to support program indicators and demonstrate management and accountability – Services rendered: current capacity of the sector to deliver settlement programs and profile client uptake. 14
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementiCAMS/iCARE – Performance Measurement in Practice Feeds into performance measurement at the regional, provincial and national level; Develop policy and programs; Monitor programs;Receive Identify gaps; andclients SPO Financial review/planning.Provideservices Enter CA* CIC service data What is information used for? Analyze data; Develop reports; Disseminate data. * Contribution Agreement 15
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementLessons Learned…and Applied: iCARE• Previous data collected did not enable adequate reporting on the outputs, outcomes and achievements of settlement programs.• The revamped Immigration Contribution Agreement Reporting Environment (iCARE) contains: – New labelling systems and additional data elements reflect the modernized approach to settlement – Adjustments support evaluation and necessary modifications of outcomes, efficiency and effectiveness of programs – More robust data capture will support program indicators and demonstrate strong management and accountability – Streamlining of data capture sources will help identify gaps – Data will feed into program, policy and departmental accountability. 16
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementPerformance Measurement Done Right• Strong performance measurement is beneficial to all stakeholders and Service Providing Organizations (SPOs). – Better situated to tell the story right – Early identification of gaps which allow for collective corrective response.• The new iCARE will be: – More efficient – More informative – Less burden – Provide better reports. 17
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementMoving Forward with iCARE• A phased approach is being used in the development and implementation of the new system• The new system is being designed to benefit stakeholders at the departmental, provincial, regional and SPO level• Relationships matter: communication between all stakeholders is key to a successful outcome. 18
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement 3. Settlement Program Data Analysis Catherine Simard, ManagerPerformance Measurement and Funding 19
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementIntroduction• Purpose: To share some output data about the Settlement Program in provinces and territories where CIC manages settlement services, and discuss the vision for future analysis and reporting.• Outline – Immigrant intake from 2005 to 2010 – What do we know about settlement services? – Usage of settlement services in Ontario – What is CIC doing to ensure success of the settlement program? – Next steps – Conclusion – Annex: Usage of settlement services, 2005-06 to 2010-11 20
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementImmigrant Intake from 2005 to 2010 Proportion of immigrants from 2005 to 2010 Across Canada (outside of QC) 80.0% 75.9% Immigrant Intake 73.5% 70.0% All PTs outside 2005 64.2% Year Ontario QC 2010 60.0% 2005 218,926 140,525 52.1% 2006 206,959 125,893 50.0% 2007 191,554 111,316 2008 202,029 110,878 40.0% 2009 202,681 106,859 2010 226,699 118,113 30.0% 20.4% 19.5% 20.0% 14.4% 8.9% 10.0% 7.0% 3.7% 3.4% 3.5% 1.8% 1.0% 0.0% Manitoba British-Columbia PTs outside QC, MB, Atlantic Provinces Ontario Saskatchewan Alberta BC 21
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementWhat Do We Know About Settlement Services? From 2005-06 to 2010-11, for provinces and territories where CIC manages settlement services, the usage of any settlement service has increased by 53.4%, while the immigrant intake has increased by 0.4% (7% across Canada).• In 2010-11, 192,806 unique clients used at least one settlement service, and the main users were: – Category of immigrants: the economic class 43.0%, the family class 27.0%, and the refugees 21.9% – Age at arrival: 24-64 years of age 68.3% – Gender: Female clients 54.8%, and Male clients 39.9% – Level of education: 0-12 years of schooling 45.5%, bachelor’s degree 21.4%• In 2010-11, 131,232 unique clients used at least one information and orientation service, and the main users were: – Category of immigrants: the economic class 43.1%, the family class 23.6%, and the refugees 23.8% – Age at arrival: 24-64 years of age 64.0% – Gender: Female clients 51.7%, and Male clients 41.7% – Level of education: 0-12 years of schooling 47.9%, bachelor’s degree 19.9%• In 2010-11, 63,520 unique clients enrolled in language training, and the main users were: – Category of immigrants: the economic class 36.9%, the family class 36.4%, and the refugees 23.0% – Age at arrival: 24-64 years of age 81.8% – Gender: Female clients 66.2%, Male clients 32.4% – Level of education: 0-12 years of schooling 39.8%, bachelor’s degree 24.5% – Training Format: Part-time 58.1%, Full time 45.6%, and Distance 3.4% – LINC level: 32% attended more than one level 22
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement Usage of Settlement Services in Ontario Settlement Services usage in Ontario from 2005-06 to 2010-11 195,000 185,000 175,000 Number of Uniques Clients 165,000 Any Services 41.9% increase 155,000 since 2005-06 Usage of settlement All PTs 145,000services increased since outside QC 135,000 2005-06 125,000 Any Services 53.4% 115,000 Info & Orientation 94.1% increase 105,000 Information & Orientation 111.6% since 2005-06 95,000 Language Training 26.1% 85,000 Language Assessment 16.6% 75,000 Language Training 65,000 17.3% increase since 2005-06 55,000 Language 45,000 Assessment 8.6% increase since 35,000 2005-06 25,000 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 Clients who received at least one settlement service 104,602 97,636 106,258 126,467 139,775 148,419 Clients who received information / orientation servic es in Canada 53,556 49,386 57,444 75,682 87,175 103,928 Clients who attended LINC Language Training 42,588 41,125 42,697 44,595 46,941 49,970 Clients who received a LINC Assessment or Reassessment 32,023 29,159 29,937 33,832 34,286 34,770 Note: For Information & Orientation Services aggregate data entry was phased out after July 2010. 23
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementWhat is CIC Doing to Ensure the Success of the Settlement Program?A visual representation of the interaction between elements of the June 2008 ARAF that relate to performance measurement of the CIC Settlement Program. Evidence Based Decision-Making Outputs Monitoring Settlement Program Financial & operational activities • Logic Model with expected Outcomes exercised by settlement officers • Terms and conditions over contribution agreements and • Funding Immediate SPOs. Outcomes Settlement Services Performance Based on priorities for services Measurement and programming and directives On-going collection of to manage contribution Intermediate information on program agreements (left side of the logic Outcomes performance (outputs & model) outcomes) to guide decision-making and enable reporting on Ultimate program results Outcomes Evidence Based Decision-Making Evaluation Audit Systematic collection and analysis of the performance of a program to make judgements about relevance, progress or success and cost- To determine whether the Department’s strategy and practices effectiveness to inform future programming decisions about design related to risk management, control, and governance processes are and implementation. adequate. 24
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement Next Steps (1/2)1. Fact Sheets (outputs): To complete the analysis of the Settlement Programdata, Fact Sheets will include:• Scope of the analysis• Analysis of data available – Intake, programming, studies, costs, etc. – Graphs to show trends and variations• Are the results consistent with what is expected? – Why/Why not?, Any variations, per PT, per level of education, demographic, gender, other?• Do we need to change programming to achieve something different or to build on good practices?The Fact Sheets will be: Proposed Subjects• Developed in collaboration with subject-matter experts Across the Settlement Program• Approved by senior managers and available as reference tools Language• Made available to the public, either in whole or in part Information and Orientation• Produced regularly and updated to reflect the most recent Refugees information Seniors• Permit evidence-based policy development and program changes. Youth Parents and Grandparents 25
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement Next Steps (2/2)2. Annual Project Performance Report (immediate outcomes)• Starting in November, the Report will be implemented across the Settlement Program (with opportunities for refinements in the future)• The objectives of the Report are threefold: – improve information collected about project results; – make better use of the information collected; and – strengthen the evidence base for on-going performance measurement, policy decisions, and program development and evaluations• Results are expected in spring 20123. Settlement Program Client Survey (intermediate outcomes)• The client survey is a pilot project for measuring outcomes of CIC’s Settlement Program and reporting key findings• Results are expected in spring 2012 26
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementConclusion• With all these measures and your support, we will be able to demonstrate the impact of our actions.• Together, we all make a difference in the settlement and integration of newcomers.• We must be able to show it! 27
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementAnnex:Usage of Settlement Services, 2005-06 to 2010-11 (Outside QC, MB & BC) A) Number of unique clients who Variation received at least one Settlement 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2010 over 2005 service All PTs outside QC, MB and BC 125,652 121,205 133,931 159,591 178,321 192,806 53.4% Atlantic Provinces 2,917 3,457 4,560 5,341 6,519 7,380 153.0% Ontario 104,602 97,636 106,258 126,467 139,775 148,419 41.9% Saskatchewan 1,730 1,784 2,419 2,797 4,044 5,311 207.0% Alberta 16,996 18,969 21,397 25,699 28,644 32,434 90.8% Territories 81 63 31 80 80 129 59.3% B) Number of unique clients who Variation received information / orientation 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2010 over 2005 services in Canada 1 All PTs outside QC, MB and BC 62,013 59,269 69,616 91,623 105,328 131,232 111.6% Atlantic Provinces 529 548 558 724 1,072 4,233 700.2% Ontario 53,556 49,386 57,444 75,682 87,175 103,928 94.1% Saskatchewan 1,155 1,101 1,522 1,629 2,227 2,851 146.8% Alberta 6,998 8,407 10,249 13,773 15,027 20,520 193.2% Territories 38 37 13 52 29 74 94.7% C) Number of unique clients who Variation 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 attended LINC Language Training 2010 over 2005 All PTs outside QC, MB and BC 50,390 49,585 52,839 55,622 59,764 63,520 26.1% Atlantic Provinces 1,017 1,164 1,490 1,638 1,841 1,972 93.9% Ontario 42,588 41,125 42,697 44,595 46,941 49,970 17.3% Saskatchewan 706 761 1,016 1,103 1,486 1,701 140.9% Alberta 6,189 6,634 7,758 8,412 9,565 9,930 60.4% Territories 0 19 7 15 26 84 N/A Data Source: iCAMS – April 2011 detailed iCAMS data extract. D) Number of unique clients who Variation Note: Regional totals (Atlanticreceived a LINC Language Assessment 2005-06 2006-07 2007-08 2008-09 2009-10 2010-11 2010 over 2005 Provinces and the Territories) may or Reassessment Service All PTs outside QC, MB and BC 39,718 37,912 38,836 43,239 45,733 46,313 16.6% include clients who moved from one Atlantic Provinces 769 989 1,303 1,396 1,740 1,919 149.5% province to another in the same region Ontario 32,023 29,159 29,937 33,832 34,286 34,770 8.6% within a given fiscal year, meaning, Saskatchewan 468 590 685 927 1,481 1,979 322.9% some clients may be counted more Alberta 6,499 7,207 6,963 7,124 8,264 7,618 17.2% Territories 42 27 5 19 36 102 142.9% than once. 28
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement 4. Grants and Contributions: Risk-Based Management ofRelationships with Organizations Wally Boxhill, Director Integration Program Management 29
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementGuiding Principles for Managing Grants and Contributions (Gs&Cs) Communication Communication Accountability Acte imputable Transparency Transparence Consistency Cohérence Harmonization Harmonisation Modernization Modernisation 30
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementCIC’s Responsibilities in Managing Gs&Cs• As per the Treasury Board Policy on Transfer Payments, CIC is responsible for ensuring that: – Oversight and internal controls are cost effective and support the management of transfer payments. – Administrative requirements on recipients and staff are proportionate with identified need according to risk level. – Assessments, monitoring, reporting and auditing reflect the risk specific to the program, materiality of funding, and risk profile of the recipient.• CIC therefore needs tools and processes to: – Allow for a harmonized management of CIC’s Gs&Cs across settlement, resettlement and multiculturalism programs. – Maintain accountability and reduce administrative burden on recipients and staff in proportion to risk level. 31
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement FRAM: From Risk Aversion to Integrated Risk ManagementFunding Risk Assessment Model (FRAM)• Objective: FRAM is a new CIC tool that aims to facilitate a standardized and efficient risk-based approach for assessing, managing and mitigating risks with respect to Contribution Agreements (CAs).• Characteristics: The approach is… – Integrated: • contains both financial and program elements • Is included in program assessment processes and critical paths. – Harmonized: Consistent across settlement, resettlement and multiculturalism Gs&Cs programs – Standardized: Regions across the country speaking the same ‘risk language’ in managing programs and reporting. 32
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement FRAM Context / Risk Elements• Materiality: CIC’s exposure consequent on amount of funding and to whom.• Financial health: Financial viability based on applicants’ financial statements.• Applicant history: Review of relationship with CIC/other departments; recurring problems.• Management capacity: Established, stable, management of funds.• Legal issues: Potential legal risk for CIC.• External issues: Potential negative impact on CIC, including negative public or political attention. 33
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementFRAM “Rating” and Mitigation Strategies• FRAM’s overall rating (risk categorization) informs: – Negotiation of CA: • Cash management (frequency of payments and advances) • Holdbacks • Frequency of reporting requirements – Management of CA: • Type and frequency monitoring/audits • Scope of review of reports• FRAM’s risk elements inform mitigation strategies, allowing for focused approach in CA management. FRAM allows CA negotiation and management to be proportionate to risk. Low-risk files managed with less oversight than high-risk files 34
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementConclusions: Benefits and Timelines• Benefits of FRAM : – Integrated. Harmonized. Standardized. – In line with TB Policy on Transfer Payments, Directives and Guidelines. – Responds to recommendations of Blue Ribbon Panel. – Provides structure to CIC/organizational relationships.• When: FRAM will be applied from fiscal year 2012-13. 35
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement 5.Managing Gs&Cs on the Ground: Implementation Veronica Barnes, Regional DirectorSettlement, Inter-governmental Affairs and Multiculturalism Directorate (SIGAM) 36
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementCIC Ontario Region: Grants and Contributions on the Ground 37
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementReality on the Ground: Snap Shot of 2011-12Quick Facts for 2011-12:• CIC has 383 CAs with 261 SPOs across Ontario.• Of these CAs, 227 are one-year (Toronto and Hamilton) and 156 are two-year agreements.• 2011-12 Ontario funding: $346.5MImpacts of the Modernized Approach:• Accountability: more outcome-based programming, new internal measures of performance management• Innovation: process open to new, innovative ideas• Simplicity: Reduced number of CAs, less reporting for organizations providing multiple services• Consistency: Same terms and conditions across settlement services• Still “work in progress”, to be refined, responding to the shifting needs of clients 38
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement2012-13 Funding Allocation within Ontario (1/2)Principles-Based Approach• Align with CIC’s “Settlement Plans and Priorities” and Government of Canada priorities.• Maintain sector stability as much as possible.• Review all CAs based on client/community needs and financial and activity monitoring results.• Recognize minimum program delivery costs for small and medium size communities.• Maintain levels of resource currently allocated to communities with newcomer population growth as much as possible. 39
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement2012-13 Funding Allocation within Ontario (2/2)Possible Strategies:• Review all two-year CAs to ensure they are still aligned with CIC priorities and fiscal reality.• Mapping exercises to identify trends, gaps, and opportunities to consolidate.• Eliminate inefficient, ineffective services.• Establish clear negotiation guidelines.• Greater reduction from indirect services agreements to support direct services delivery.• Reduction of the maximum administrative costs to 15%.• Minimum consideration to renovation and capital procurements unless health and safety concerns. 40
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement2012-13 Negotiations Timelines• End of November/beginning of December 2011: CIC will notify Service Providers in writing whether CIC intends to begin: • negotiating a new CA for 2012-13, or • negotiating the wind-down of the current CA.• Until mid-February 2012: Negotiations for new or amended CAs.• Mid-March 2012: CIC to provide final CAs to Service Providers for signature• April 1, 2012: 100% of CAs in place. 41
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementThroughout and Beyond the Process, CIC is Committed to...• Support the settlement sector: • Online workshop on financial management • Advanced financial management classes • Support related to performance measurement initiatives• Communicate with the sector: • Communiqués • E-newsletters • OCASI Board of Governors• Work with partners: • Other federal departments, including HRSDC • Other levels of government, including MCI, Cities, Association of Municipalities of Ontario • Other funders, including United Way and Trillium. 42
    • 2. Performance 1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation MeasurementBeyond 2012-13• Launch of a new Call for Proposals in 2012 for the 2013-14 CAs• New Terms and Conditions to be developed for the 2013-14 CAs• Continued economic uncertainty domestically and globally• Evolving government-nonprofit relationship worldwide (e.g. increased role of non-government actors, such as the Gates and Clinton foundations; UK’s “Big Society” experiment)• Continuing innovation and partnership at home (e.g. Local Immigration Partnership) 43
    • 2. Performance1. Context & Direction 3. Data Analysis 5. Risk Management 6. Implementation Measurement Thank you. 44