Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
A5 b1 risk assessement_suzanne gibson_fr
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Introducing the official SlideShare app

Stunning, full-screen experience for iPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

A5 b1 risk assessement_suzanne gibson_fr

385
views

Published on


0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
385
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
1
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 1
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 9;00 am start Joan (or Jo) to welcome folks and to outline: Why ONPHA decided to provide this training, why it is needed and the ultimate goal Why a focus on PMs and EDs - ONPHA believes that the senior staff person has a unique role to play in animating their Boards to be great 2-days of learning, group work and sharing - plus there is a resource rich toolkit that contains loads of tools and helpful working documents ONPHA also provides ongoing resources through its web-based downloadable resources, Great Governance DVD and resource kit, Governance and Corporate Practices Handbook, conference course and workshops, networking and education through regional meetings, customized courses and consulting - we are also available by phone - here to strengthen the social housing sector in Ontario - and great governance at the Board table is an important part of this Introduce the session trainer
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to provide facilitate introductions Participants to respond in 2-3 sentences each Trainer to flip chart the responses - to help gauge learning areas of interest - and to ID areas that are gapping and to discern where to use the co-development strategy to possibly address unanswered needs as well as access additional resources over night Trainer to ask : Who in the room reports directly to a Board as a direct hire? And who is a property manager who has been hired through a property management firm? There are differences in these 2 positions - and I encourage folks to share their different perspectives based on where they sit in the organization and who they report to…
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Review overarching goals for the session Message about Doing Things One Step at a Time in an Achievable Way Please know that we will be covering a lot of areas in the next 2 days and out hope is that there is something you can take away to work on that is manageable. Our goal is to encourage you to walk away with a few manageable “chunks”or components of work. We can only ever start where we are at - so one key message we really want to get across to you is that change comes in steps - in baby steps. This all does not have to happen tomorrow. The goal is to work slowly and steadily towards your goals and desired outcomes. So if you walk away with 2-3 chunckable and manageable pieces of work related to supporting your Board, you will be well on your way to supporting them to achieve great governance.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Review these guidelines for the session - as agreements we make to each other for the next few days together. Ask for additional guidelines that are important to the group - and then have them sign off on them.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 What do you think governance is? Link to next slide - here a definition from Catherine Boucher, a PM in Ottawa:
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Suzanne to ask: why is great governance important to you personally? To begin to get participants to articulate the benefits of mobilizing a great Board in their own organizations - so they can answer: “What’s in it for me?” Suzanne to report on comments made from 4 advisors on this training program: Boards often don’t understand their job and the business of what we are doing - they don’t know what questions to ask. (A. Hains) Boards can get so personality-driven - great governance creates a more balanced Board. (A Hains) Conflict of interest can be a huge problem. (Trainer to share story of Board hiring a PM from the Board!) Further, Boards don’t know what they don’t know. They need to think about what they can contribute and how they can get community back into community housing (Shelly U) Small organizations rely too heavily on the PM and rarely undertake broad strategic planning while in mid to large organizations, Boards micromanage. Many are so insular that they don’t think of long term viability. (Arlene Rawson) There is often a lack of consistent supervision and process (P. Bell) These factors - and more - have a direct impact on our jobs and our programs and impact in the community. Great governance - while it takes work, time and resources - ultimately, it makes our jobs easier and more effective.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to review these broadly and swiftly - detail has been provided to demonstrate the complexity of our world and realities - and to demonstrate the diversity of issues affecting us and our Boards. A number of these issues will have already been identified by the groups from the previous slide and exercise.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Focused questions for the broad group. Signs of high functioning Boards to be noted on one flip chart. Signs of dysfunction or ineffectual governance to be noted on another. Both to be posted on the wall for reference over the 2 days. 10:30 am break here after slide is done
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Focused questions for the broad group. Signs of high functioning Boards to be noted on one flip chart. Signs of dysfunction or ineffectual governance to be noted on another. Both to be posted on the wall for reference over the 2 days. 10:30 am break here after slide is done
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Focused questions for the broad group. Signs of high functioning Boards to be noted on one flip chart. Signs of dysfunction or ineffectual governance to be noted on another. Both to be posted on the wall for reference over the 2 days. 10:30 am break here after slide is done
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Focused questions for the broad group. Signs of high functioning Boards to be noted on one flip chart. Signs of dysfunction or ineffectual governance to be noted on another. Both to be posted on the wall for reference over the 2 days. 10:30 am break here after slide is done
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Focused questions for the broad group. Signs of high functioning Boards to be noted on one flip chart. Signs of dysfunction or ineffectual governance to be noted on another. Both to be posted on the wall for reference over the 2 days. 10:30 am break here after slide is done
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 To keep risk management simple, you can facilitate the Board to answer 3 questions - you can also present reports to the Board that address these 3 areas for their discussion.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 Trainer to ask for a risk issue that an organization is facing in order to run the group through the 3 questions against the issue. Explain group exercise to be done at tables. This is intended to be a short touchdown - so not a lot of time will be dedicated to it but enough to give the group an idea of how the discussion might flow. If no one identifies a current issue then present: You have aging tenants who have been causing smaller fires in your building. How might these 3 questions help? In debrief, possible strategies include: Sprinkler over bed Move eldery to a higher level of care Tenant education, etc.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 For organizations that need to go through more elaborate risk management - a committee can be devised to undertake this work. Trainer to share story of Canadian Crossroads International’s(CCI) Board who embarked on a comprehensive risk management process in 2002/2003. After 9/11, the threat of terrorism along with changes in cross border movement and safety forced CCI to think about what could happen to their overseas volunteers if they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. The Board was also worried about volunteers working in areas where violence or war might erupt. The CCI Board created an ad hoc risk management committee (which included a Board member with corporate risk management experience) and delved deeply into comprehensive risk management assessment and planning. Trainer to also share the risk management chart that the Board committee devised so the participants can see how intensively the process was undertaken.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 2 For organizations that need to go through more elaborate risk management - a committee can be devised to undertake this work. Trainer to share story of Canadian Crossroads International’s(CCI) Board who embarked on a comprehensive risk management process in 2002/2003. After 9/11, the threat of terrorism along with changes in cross border movement and safety forced CCI to think about what could happen to their overseas volunteers if they were in the wrong place at the wrong time. The Board was also worried about volunteers working in areas where violence or war might erupt. The CCI Board created an ad hoc risk management committee (which included a Board member with corporate risk management experience) and delved deeply into comprehensive risk management assessment and planning. Trainer to also share the risk management chart that the Board committee devised so the participants can see how intensively the process was undertaken.
  • It is not good for Boards be frequently tabling decisions to the next meeting, referring matters back to committees, or avoiding decisions…important to have a decision making model - you can ask the Chair or Governance Committee to address this at your first or 2nd meeting after the AGM - as part of a code of conduct discussion. Shelley D. says Boards don’t know what they don’t know - they don’t know what info. they need - so we need to help with this. We need to provide a clean and clear process around information sharing and problem solving. Shelley says’ “The best way to support good governance is to act as a professional yourself. See yourself as a leader. Angie Hains says: Boards don’t always know the questions they need to ask - they don’t know how to frame a problem. We need to play a key role into his area. She says Boards need to agree to their decision making process in advance. To understand an issue: need to take time to articulate the problem--to allow for time to ask questions--make sure the President has tabled enough time. Send information and options out in advance of a meeting. Committees are useful for doing research. You as the ED can shape how information is framed and presented. To examine the problem, groups make better decisions if they have choices in front of them--it is best to generate options before hand. You can also brainstorm, and set up smaller discussion groups to identify alternatives. It is also important to consider implications and consequences. EDs and PMs who present scenarios and options and their best recommendations - to begin to frame issues and provide Boards with a baseline from which to discuss options, approaches, decisions and their implications. Support the Board in its decision making by being transparent and clear with its information process. Consensus Building--less formal than voting and allows a decision to encompass the views of all the Board members. This process generates a wider range of ideas and options. Discussion centres around finding the best approach. The question is reframed several times and various options are developed. People have to be willing to offer honest opinions and new ideas and be willing to change opinions and listen. Pure consensus: decision is not finalized until all members agree to it. Active opposition blocks a decision. To pass a decision, board members agree to let a motion stand so it does not always have strong support. General Consensus: If majority of the board supports a decision then it carries. Concerns and reservations of non-supporting board members may be noted. Decision by majority rule? Formal motion is presented and a vote is taken on the motion. How the motion is framed shapes the scope of the discussion and can narrow options. A motion reduces the options to one and limits the response to yes or no. So the process of framing the question and options is as important as the vote itself. Best not to propose motions to early in the discussion--need to look at a problem broadly. You may want to meet with the Executive to frame possible motions. You need to make sure the decision is documented (with the Secretary) and that there is a strategy to communicate it to key stakeholders - as appropriate. You can also bring the decision up at a later date to ask the Board to evaluate it - if it is not working well or if there’s something to learn from it.
  • Supporting Great Governance Day 1 of 1 4:55 pm Trainer to secure a takeaway from each participant and flip chart results to see where the content has had resonance with the group. Trainer to remind folks to fill out the evaluation forms and to then close with a big thank you and reference to the fact that we have an expert with a final message for us all.
  • Transcript

    • 1. L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Forum de Directrices et Directeurs généraux d’OCASI 2011 Ré-imaginons le secteur Les 10 et 11 novembre 2011 Une présentation faite par Suzanne Gibson
    • 2. Bienvenue L’évaluation et la gestion des risques UN AMUSE-GUEULE POUR L’ESPRIT «  La gestion des risques est probablement une des choses les plus importantes qu’une organisation fait. Et lorsqu’on pense aux risques, on pense aux finances. Les risques peuvent réellement avoir un impact sur chaque partie de l’organisation. Ainsi, la gestion des risques est, à vrai dire, l’identification des menaces qui planent sur une organisation, l’analyse de telles menaces pour en peser l’importance, et par la suite l’élimination d’un risque, son transfert, sa mitigation ou bien la décision d’aller de l’avant même si le risque existe . » Carl Henderson, expert en matière de logement.
    • 3. Présentations
      • Votre nom et votre organisation
      • Une chose que vous savez au sujet de la gestion des risques.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 4. Objectifs de la séance
      • Définir la gestion des risques et explorer les différentes catégories de risques dans le contexte des organismes sans but lucratif et de bienfaisance.
      • Discuter des approches de gestion des risques et mettre au point des stratégies pour répondre aux risques.
      • Passer en révision une variété d’outils et de ressources utiles pour le travail de gestion des risques par le Conseil d’administration et le personnel.
      • Découvrir et offrir des solutions, suggestions et approches très pratiques qui aideront votre organisation à devenir plus alerte et plus apte à répondre aux risques.
      • Concevoir des actions à mettre à l’œuvre qui mèneront votre organisation à intégrer la gestion des risques dans son travail quotidien.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 5. Directives pour la séance
      • En tout temps, une ouverture pour les questions.
      • Aucune question ou idée n’est stupide : les idées divergentes ouvrent notre esprit!
      • Tout le monde participe.
      • Respectons la personne qui parle.
      • Amusons-nous et restons ouverts au partage et aux expériences des autres!
      • Testons et partageons nos hypothèses.
      • Ne rejetons pas : proposons.
      • Prenons acte des points de confidentialité.
      • D’autres directives.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 6. Le risque : c’est quoi ?
      • La gouvernance est définie comme « l’ensemble des processus et des structures qu’on utilise pour diriger et gérer les opérations et les activités d’une organisation. »
      • Groupe d'experts sur la saine gestion et la transparence dans le secteur bénévole du Canada
      • En dernière analyse, nous sommes redevables au public
      • Un risque est tout élément qui menace la capacité de votre organisation d’accomplir sa mission et de préserver sa réputation. Il se mesure en termes de conséquences et de niveau de probabilité.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 7. Les risques
      • Notre travail est devenu de plus en plus complexe et la possibilité d’un litige est plus grande que jamais.
      • Il y a deux manières dont une organisation rencontre des risques:
      • Des risques qui affectent l’organisation.
      • Des risques qui affectent directement les
      • membres de son Conseil d’administration.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Un risque est tout élément qui menace la capacité de votre organisation d’accomplir sa mission et de préserver sa réputation. Il se mesure en termes de conséquences et de niveau de probabilité.
    • 8. La gestion des risques
      • La gestion des risques comprend une culture, des processus et des structures axés sur la gestion efficace d’opportunités potentielles et d’effets adverses.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Avez-vous des processus et des structures en place? Qu ’ est-ce qui caract é rise votre culture par rapports aux risques?
    • 9. Pourquoi la gestion des risques ?
      • L’aspect négatif
      • Sous la législation en matière de responsabilité, l’organisation et/ou les administrateurs individuels peuvent être tenus responsables de payer des dommages si on n’a pas pris des précautions raisonnables pour protéger les clients, le personnel et le public général face à ces dommages.
      • L’aspect positif
      • Grâce à une gestion de risques efficace, vous pouvez prendre des risques calculés pour créer, bâtir et établir des opportunités pour votre organisation, vos clients et locataires. Vous pouvez être générateur et dynamique et savoir que vous êtes en train d’évaluer les risques de manière consciente et avec la diligence due. Les opportunistes aiment la gestion des risques!
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques La gestion des risques mène vers des organismes qui tirent avantage proactivement et consciemment des opportunités qui se présentent.
    • 10.
        • Un contexte qui évolue de manière accélérée
        • Un environnement qui change constamment, avec des modifications législatives et des défis liés au respect de la loi.
        • Une population diverse avec des clients à haute priorité et avec des besoins complexes.
        • De nouvelles lois, technologies et constatations de recherche : une surabondance d’information !
        • Des changements et modifications dans l’environnement du financement (un accent de plus en plus fort mis sur la gestion des risques, une plus grande transparence/imputabilité, etc.).
        • De plus en plus d’alliances et de partenariats.
        • Un accent de plus en plus fort mis sur la gouvernance et la gestion efficaces.
      • D’autres?
      Pourquoi la gestion des risques ? L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 11. La théorie de la complexité : des réflexions à prendre en considération
      • Simple  : faire un gâteau : quelques éléments en mouvement qui suivent une trajectoire prévisible.
      • Compliqué  : envoyer une fusée sur la lune : beaucoup d’éléments en mouvement qui suivent une trajectoire prévisible.
      • Complexe  : élever un enfant : beaucoup d’éléments en mouvement qui n’ont pas des trajectoires prévisibles.
              • Getting to Maybe, F. Westley
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 12. La gestion des risques
        • Définir la tolérance aux risques et gérer les risques peuvent aider une organisation à atteindre ses objectifs et à fleurir.
        • La gestion des risques implique, d’habitude, tout le monde, y compris le Conseil d’administration, la directrice générale, le personnel et les bénévoles. Beaucoup d’activités impliquent une gestion des risques, dont la rédaction de politiques et de procédures, l’identification des buts des services et la soumission de rapports financiers et autres.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 13. Le rôle du Conseil d’administration dans la gestion des risques
      • Le Conseil d’administration a la responsabilité d’ensemble sur la gestion des risques et, par le biais de politiques et d’approbations, il délègue au directeur général et au personnel la plupart des aspects détaillés de l’identification, évaluation et gestion des risques que l’organisation confronte.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 14. Le rôle du Conseil d’administration dans la gestion des risques
      • La teneur de l’implication du Conseil d’administration dans la gestion des risques varie en fonction de la taille et de la portée de l’organisation et de son personnel:
      • Dans les organisations plus grandes , les membres du CA peuvent se fier au personnel pour la gestion quotidienne des risques et le CA s’implique à l’approbation des politiques, stratégies et décisions majeures.
      • Dans les organismes plus petits , où le personnel pourrait avoir moins d’expérience ou de compétences, le CA pourrait davantage mettre la main à la pâte.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Quel type d’organisation est la vôtre?
    • 15. Quels sont les principaux risques que votre organisme pourrait retrouver? L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 16. Quels sont les principaux risques? L’évaluation et la gestion des risques La perte du financement La fraude Les désastres naturels Une réponse inadéquate à une situation d’urgence La perte ou le vol d’information Les blessures affectant des individus Les abus La gestion des acquis/le maintien de la propriété Des augmentations excessives au coût des ressources humaines ou autres La mauvaise conduite d’un bénévole ou d’un employé D’autres?
    • 17.
        • Les risques sont reliés les uns aux autres et ils évoluent dans plusieurs catégories.
        • Les catégories de risques peuvent inclure:
        • Financiers : risque de fraude, d’échec financier, décisions basées sur des informations inadéquates ou imprécises : comptabilité appropriée, limites, fraude, défis financiers, financement, investissements, taxation, assurances, etc.
        • Risques opérationnels: risque de perte ou d’empêchement de prestation de services/programmes suite à des processus, personnes ou systèmes inadéquats ou inefficaces, ou suite à des événements externes: immobilier, espaces physiques, programmes et services, technologie/ technologie de l’information, ressources humaines, marque de commerce, relations avec les médias et relations nationales, gestion de crise/continuité des opérations/planification de contingences, etc.
      Types de risque L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 18.
          • Les catégories de risques peuvent inclure :
          • Juridiques/réglementaires/respect des exigences: le risque de résultats adverses suite au non respect des lois, règles, règlements, pratiques obligatoires, normes ou autres exigences légales : lois en vigueur, litiges, documents juridiques clés, relations avec les gouvernements, etc.
          • Stratégiques: le risque qui résulte de stratégies inappropriées ou inefficaces ou de l’absence de réponses aux changements dans l’environnement : plan stratégique, partenariats stratégiques, etc.
      Types de risque L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 19.
        • Les catégories de risques peuvent inclure:
      • Gouvernance: le risque d’une supervision inefficace et d’une mauvaise prise de décisions: lignes d’autorité, opérations du Conseil d’administration, politiques et procédures, informations/rapports à l’intention du CA, etc.
      • Risques touchant à la réputation: le risque que des tierces parties aient des impressions négatives concernant les pratiques, actions ou omissions de l’organisation peut causer un déclin dans les programmes et services de l’organisation, dans l’habileté de cette dernière à cueillir des fonds, dans sa marque de commerce et/ou la bonne volonté au sein de la communauté.
      Types de risque L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Jetez un coup d’œil sur la Vérification de la gouvernance de l’ONPHA.
    • 20. Gérer les risques
        • Le processus actif d ’ identifier et d ’é valuer les risques et de d é velopper des plans d ’ action qu’y répondent en vue de les gérer.
        • Généralement, le CA entreprend la révision stratégique alors que le personnel gère et évalue les implications opérationnelles et les limites juridiques.
        • Il est nécessaire de mettre au point une stratégie de gestion des risques : commencez par définir la portée du risque qu’un CA est prêt à prendre.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques La capacit é de prendre des risques d é pend tant des assurances que des r é serves financi è res.
    • 21. L’évaluation des risques
      • Promouvez une discussion au sujet des risques confrontés par votre organisme et identifiez les risques principaux qui requièrent des actions.
      • Aidez le Conseil d’administration à comprendre les forces et faiblesses de l’organisation face aux risques.
      • Aidez à établir les priorités globales, l’effort de travail et la tolérance générale face aux risques.
        • Vous voudrez peut-être établir et enclencher un processus annuel d’évaluation des risques, visant à identifier les principaux 3 à 5 risques confrontés par l’organisation et à établir un plan d’action correspondant, au besoin.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 22. L’évaluation des risques
      • Échelle de risques
      • Haut impact, haute probabilité : une action immédiate est requise et une considérable activité de contrôle est essentielle.
      • Haut impact, basse probabilité : il faut gérer et surveiller ce risque, puis considérer une planification de contingences.
      • Bas impact, haute probabilité : un effort de gestion vaut la peine.
      • Bas impact, basse probabilité : il faut l’accepter, mais il faut le surveiller.
      • Questions clés à se poser lorsqu’on évalue les risques:
      • Ce risque pourrait-il affecter la capacité de l’organisme à atteindre ses objectifs?
      • Quelle est la probabilité que ce risque se réalise?
      • Combien sérieux cela pourrait-il s’avérer?
      • Est-ce que quelque chose devrait/pourrait être fait pour réduire le risque?
      • Comment pouvons-nous nous préparer pour répondre aux problèmes?
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 23. La gestion des risques
      • Établissez un registre des risques pour faire le suivi des risques organisationnels significatifs (en plus des 5 les plus importants) qui requièrent une attention sur la durée.
      • Développez un plan d’action pour répondre aux risques.
      • Les options de gestion incluent :
        • Éviter/éliminer le risque (se débarrasser d’un équipement non sécuritaire)
        • Transférer le risque (embaucher un sous-traitant avec assurance pour un service)
        • Mitiger le risque (développer des politiques et des procédures pour réduire l’exposition au risque)
        • Accepter le risque (inclure des fonds dans le budget pour les contingences)
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 24. La gestion des risques
      • Discutez s’il est possible ou conseillé de mettre sur pied un comité de travail du CA avec la Directrice générale pour passer en révision et mettre en œuvre un processus de gestion des risques.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Ce processus peut être plus complexe ou plus simple.
    • 25.
      • 3 questions simples pour faciliter la discussion
          • Qu’est-ce qui pourrait mal tourner?
          • Que ferons-nous pour éviter que cela tourne mal?
          • Que ferons-nous si, en effet, cela tourne mal? Pouvons-nous nous le permettre?
      La gestion des risques L’évaluation et la gestion des risques Documentez tous les points de discussion.
    • 26.
      • La gestion des risques
      • Posez ces questions dans le cadre d’un scénario
      • Choisissez un risque qui affecte actuellement votre organisation. Partagez les détails puis posez les questions
      • 3 questions simples pour faciliter la discussion
      • Qu’est-ce qui pourrait mal tourner?
      • Que ferons-nous pour éviter que cela tourne mal?
      • Que ferons-nous si, en effet, cela tourne mal? Pouvons-nous nous le permettre?
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 27. L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
      • Mettez sur pied un comité de gestion des risques pour développer une stratégie:
      • définissez les objectifs de la gestion des risques;
      • développez une liste des risques imaginables;
      • mesurez le niveau de probabilité de chaque risque et les niveaux de risque acceptables;
      • concentrez les efforts sur les risques à haute probabilité et haut impact;
      • développez une stratégie de mitigation et une stratégie de prévention pour chaque risque : prenez en considération des enjeux clés à propos des capacités et des ressources;
      • prenez du recul pour déterminer le travail nécessaire à répondre au risque (comparez les coûts avec les bénéfices des réponses potentielles);
      • établissez des contrôles financiers et des protocoles de réponse incluant l’information et la communication;
      • surveillez votre travail de gestion des risques pour déterminer s’il y a des améliorations à faire.
      Une approche plus formelle de la gestion des risques
    • 28. L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
      • Processus internes : entrevues, sondages, remue-méninges, discussions.
      • Révision à l’externe: comparaisons avec d’autres, partage entre pairs, identification de repères, études de cas, pratiques prometteuses .
      • Assistance d’experts: consultants en matière de risques, vérifications, ateliers et formations, etc .
      Des processus relatifs aux risques
    • 29. La gestion des risques
      • Outils:
      • Cette boîte à outils pour la gestion des risques, incluant la Vérification de la gouvernance.
      • Comptables agréés du Canada : 20 questions.
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 30. Résolution de problèmes
      • La prise de décisions
      • Il est nécessaire de comprendre et définir le problème.
      • Examen du problème : recherche, remue-méninges, chercher des commentaires, tenir des discussions, évaluer le risque, etc.
      • Déterminez le résultat que vous désirez atteindre.
      • Générez des solutions possibles : analysez les options et les pour et les contre .
      • Utilisez un comité pour explorer l’enjeu et pour formuler des recommandations.
      • Prenez la décision :
        • Par consensus.
        • Par majorité.
      • Documentez et mettez à l’œuvre la décision : considérez quelles ressources sont nécessaires et qui fera quoi, et quand. Répondez à toute question relative au risque par le biais de stratégies.
      • Communiquez la chose à toutes les parties concernées.
      • Évaluez la décision : apprenez du processus de prise de décisions et de la qualité des décisions prises. Une décision supplémentaire pourrait être nécessaire pour résoudre un problème auquel on n’est pas en train de répondre.
      Comment prenez-vous des décisions qui mitigent les risques? L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 31. La gestion des risques
      • Question
      • Quelle(s) action(s) entreprendrez-vous comme résultat de cette séance?
      L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
    • 32. La gestion des risques : en guise de clôture L’évaluation et la gestion des risques
      • « Je pense que parfois nous avons l’habitude de ne pas vouloir partager les mauvaises nouvelles et, souvent, nous voyons les risques comme une mauvaise nouvelle dont nous sommes responsables. Moi, je vois cela un peu différemment. Je pense que, si nous ne parlons pas des risques, nous pourrions tomber dans un grand piège et ouvrir notre organisation et nos résidents à davantage de risques. Alors, pour moi, c’est excitant lorsque nous pouvons en parler et trouver une manière d’y répondre. Alors : soulevez-le, parlez-en. Vous vous sentirez beaucoup plus assurés. »
      • Patti Bell, Directrice générale, Blue Door Shelters
      Merci d’avoir participé.