INDUSTRIAL METALS, MINERALS
AND MINEABLE ENERGY
INVESTMENT SUMMIT 2010
LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & INDUSTRY ● WEDNESDAY, ...
Industrial Minerals
Mere geological curiosity
or
Sound business investment?
By
Gerry Clarke
Industrial Minerals Commentator
Industrial Minerals
Any naturally occurring substance exploited for
industrial value other than for a source of fuel,
meta...
Industrial Minerals
Encompass more than 50 rocks & minerals from
apatite thru diatomite, gypsum, nepheline
syenite, potash...
Industrial Minerals
Place value and unit value extremes – examples:
sand & gravel, industrial diamond, fluorspar
Overlap w...
Processing Industrial Minerals
All levels of complexity:
Size Reduction, Classification, Cleaning
Mineral Separation & Con...
Industrial Minerals Markets
Markets are complex
Grades are numerous & deposit specific
Specifications are numerous
Variabl...
Industrial Minerals
Examples
Talc
Fluorspar
Magnesia
Talc Mg3Si4O10(OH)2
Diverse mineralogy, sources and markets
Many kinds of talc deposit
Paint, Plastics, Paper, Ceramics, C...
Fluorspar CaF2
Chemical: HF and derivatives
Metallurgy: steel and aluminium
Other: ceramics & welding rod electrodes
Some ...
Magnesia: synthetic periclase MgO
Macrocrystalline magnesite (90% total resource)
Cryptocrystalline magnesite MgCO3
Brucit...
Some thoughts
Comalco: kaolin in Australia
Silica sand in the Caribbean
Spodumene in North Carolina
Fluorspar in UK, Tasma...
Bottom Line
Compared with other mineral resource types the
successful development of industrial minerals
projects is far m...
Bottom Line
A technically excellent industrial mineral deposit
may well remain a geological curiosity whilst
an inferior o...
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Industrial Minerals: curiosity or sound investment?

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Objective Capital's Industrial Metals, Minerals & Investment Summit 2010
London Chamber of Commerce and Industry
3 November 2010
Speaker: Gerry Clarke, Industrial MInerals Advisor

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Industrial Minerals: curiosity or sound investment?

  1. 1. INDUSTRIAL METALS, MINERALS AND MINEABLE ENERGY INVESTMENT SUMMIT 2010 LONDON CHAMBER OF COMMERCE & INDUSTRY ● WEDNESDAY, 30 NOV 2010 www.ObjectiveCapitalConferences.com Industrial Minerals: curiosity or sound investment? Gerry Clarke – Industrial Minerals Advisor
  2. 2. Industrial Minerals Mere geological curiosity or Sound business investment? By Gerry Clarke Industrial Minerals Commentator
  3. 3. Industrial Minerals Any naturally occurring substance exploited for industrial value other than for a source of fuel, metal, precious stone, or water. Where appropriate for commercial analytical sense the man-made counterparts of industrial minerals are also included.
  4. 4. Industrial Minerals Encompass more than 50 rocks & minerals from apatite thru diatomite, gypsum, nepheline syenite, potash and sulphur to zircon. Evolved hand in hand with man’s increasingly sophisticated solutions for shelter, glass & ceramic, heat containment, coatings, food provision & storage, mineral exploitation, transport & communication, refining & manufacturing, high technology, and more.... Serve all facets of life we need and enjoy.
  5. 5. Industrial Minerals Place value and unit value extremes – examples: sand & gravel, industrial diamond, fluorspar Overlap with metal ores -- examples: bauxite, chromite, rutile, iron ore, magnesia Synthetic competing counterparts – examples: soda ash, abrasives, fly ash waste, graphite Physical & chemical properties important for IM.
  6. 6. Processing Industrial Minerals All levels of complexity: Size Reduction, Classification, Cleaning Mineral Separation & Concentration Heat Treatment: volatiles loss/expansion Fine grinding, Classification, Delamination Chemical modification, Blending Product forming, Shaping Tailored mineral-based solutions prevalent
  7. 7. Industrial Minerals Markets Markets are complex Grades are numerous & deposit specific Specifications are numerous Variable geographic sphere of market influence Price complexity and obscurity Supply/demand technically & economically driven Generally disordered markets Corporations vary massively in size Absence of any terminal marketplace clearing
  8. 8. Industrial Minerals Examples Talc Fluorspar Magnesia
  9. 9. Talc Mg3Si4O10(OH)2 Diverse mineralogy, sources and markets Many kinds of talc deposit Paint, Plastics, Paper, Ceramics, Cosmetics Large number of customers Many grades for different applications Market evolution by extended geographical sphere of influence & corporate consolidation
  10. 10. Fluorspar CaF2 Chemical: HF and derivatives Metallurgy: steel and aluminium Other: ceramics & welding rod electrodes Some fluorspar deposits are better than others Some synthetic competition from FSA China acidspar impact since 1980 2008 price volatility & supply squeeze Annually negotiated prices dwarf spot sales volumes Projects in the wings: Canada, Sweden, Vietnam, S Africa, ++
  11. 11. Magnesia: synthetic periclase MgO Macrocrystalline magnesite (90% total resource) Cryptocrystalline magnesite MgCO3 Brucite Mg(OH)2 (rare) Brines: seawater, aquifers, inland lakes/seas Different physical forms of magnesia for different uses are made by increasing temperature and residence times in varying kiln and furnace types (multi-hearth, shaft, rotary): Light burned CCM: 700-1,050oC highly porous reactive MgO Hard burned CCM: 1,000-1,500oC denser slow release MgO Dead burned CCM: 1,500-2,300oC refractory neg. react. MgO Electrofused MgO: 2,800-3,000oC superior ref/elec props
  12. 12. Some thoughts Comalco: kaolin in Australia Silica sand in the Caribbean Spodumene in North Carolina Fluorspar in UK, Tasmania, in sandstones Dolomite in Spain Sepiolite dominated by Tolsa in Spain White bentonite dominated by S&B in Greece Imerys dominating globally RTZ a major player in salt, diamonds, talc, borates
  13. 13. Bottom Line Compared with other mineral resource types the successful development of industrial minerals projects is far more dependent on the outcome of in-depth market research that needs to occur alongside the early exploration stages. It is more appropriate to identify market needs and then to look for industrial minerals solutions than it is to look for a market for an identified deposit.
  14. 14. Bottom Line A technically excellent industrial mineral deposit may well remain a geological curiosity whilst an inferior one may become the basis for a viable long term business dependent upon supply, demand, logistics and the propensity for materials substitution. Market intelligence is the key to success

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