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Girl's Education: The 2013 Report Card

Girl's Education: The 2013 Report Card

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Girls' Education: The 2013 Report Card originally appeared on Teach.com and was produced in conjunction with the launch of Education and Skills 2.0: New Targets and Innovative Approaches, a new book ...

Girls' Education: The 2013 Report Card originally appeared on Teach.com and was produced in conjunction with the launch of Education and Skills 2.0: New Targets and Innovative Approaches, a new book from the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Education and Skills.

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    Girl's Education: The 2013 Report Card Girl's Education: The 2013 Report Card Infographic Transcript

    • GIRLS’ EDUCATION THE 2013 REPORT CARD While girls’ education has come a long way since 1990, disparities between girls’ and boys’ school success still exist in many parts of the world. This infographic offers an overview of the current state of girls’ education. LITERACY 92% 87% worldwide literacy rate for males ages 15-24 worldwide literacy rate for females ages 15-24 The gap has closed since 1990, when the global literacy rate for females in this age group was 79%, as compared with 88% for males.1 The largest gender discrepancies in literacy occur in:1 SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA SOUTH ASIA MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA Of the 774 million illiterate people in the world, two-thirds are female.2 PRIMARY ENROLLMENT1 Girls have nearly caught up to boys in primary enrollment. This is true at all income levels — a marked change since 1990, when girls’ enrollment was far lower than that of boys (except in high-income countries). Regions where significant enrollment disparities still exist: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA SOUTH ASIA A few countries still stand out for the low fraction of girls enrolled in primary school: 41% ERITREA MALI NIGERIA PAKISTAN 75% 79% 85% SECONDARY ENROLLMENT1 Girls’ enrollment in secondary education has increased substantially since 1990 and, on a global basis, is nearly equal to that of males. DISPARITIES STILL EXIST 49% rate for girls in low enrollment 54% rate for boys in low enrollment and lower-middle income countries and lower-middle income countries Regions with the largest enrollment disparities: SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA SOUTH ASIA Countries with an exceptionally low percentage of girls enrolled in secondary school: 15% CHAD PAKISTAN TANZANIA 29% 28% In Latin America and Caribbean, 93% of girls are enrolled in secondary school, ahead of boys at 87%. Countries where girls’ enrollment exceeds boys’: ARGENTINA BANGLADESH HONDURAS LESOTHO COLOMBIA QATAR URUGUAY OUT-OF-SCHOOL CHILDREN2 Number of girls not enrolled in school, worldwide: Of primary school age: 31 MILLION Of lower secondary school: 34 MILLION Together, three countries – Nigeria, Pakistan and Ethiopia – have around 9.5 million girls of primary school age out of school NEARLY ONE-THIRD OF THE WORLD’S TOTAL. TERTIARY ENROLLMENT1 WORLDWIDE, more females than males are enrolled in higher education. The disparity is greatest in high-income countries (82% versus 65%), and is reversed in low- and lower-middle-income countries. COMPLETION RATE AND TRANSITIONS Globally, the primary completion rate for girls matches that of boys—a big change since 1990.1 Girls still fall well behind in:1 SUB-SAHARAN AFRICA MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA In developing countries, almost 25% OF YOUNG WOMEN (AGED 15-24) – a total of 116 million – have never completed primary school, meaning they lack the needed skills for many occupations.2 GRADE REPETITION RATES1 In general, both primary and secondary repetition rates are similar for girls and boys. EXCEPTIONS: MIDDLE EAST AND NORTH AFRICA LATIN AMERICA AND THE CARIBBEAN 1 World Development Indicators 2013 2 UNESCO Institute for Statistics created by oBizMedia