• Share
  • Email
  • Embed
  • Like
  • Save
  • Private Content
Fear and Loathing in Academia - Miedo y temor en el mundo académico
 

Fear and Loathing in Academia - Miedo y temor en el mundo académico

on

  • 634 views

Presentación de John Hagen, consultor independiente y dueño de la firma Renaissance Scholarly Communications.

Presentación de John Hagen, consultor independiente y dueño de la firma Renaissance Scholarly Communications.

Statistics

Views

Total Views
634
Views on SlideShare
600
Embed Views
34

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0

1 Embed 34

http://www.openaccessperu.org 34

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

    Fear and Loathing in Academia - Miedo y temor en el mundo académico Fear and Loathing in Academia - Miedo y temor en el mundo académico Presentation Transcript

    • Fear and Loathing inAcademia:Socio-Political and Economic Factors ImpactingScholarly Communications in the Digital Era John H. Hagen
    • Agenda Scholarly Communications Today – Where are we?  History of economics in scholarly publishing – John Houghton  History of scholarly publishing  Citation Impact Factor and Social Networking – Stevan Harnad  Environment John H. Hagen
    • Agenda Impediments to open access  Monopolies and Oligopolies  e-books and e-journals  Access to information, scholarly publishing and human progress The Singularity: Ray Kurzweil ETDs and Scholarly publishing John H. Hagen
    • Agenda  Fear and loathing in academia  The 99% - from Wall Street to University Avenue – An Academic Spring  Abundance is our future - Peter Diamandis Evolution of Paradigms John H. Hagen
    • Agenda Conclusions City 2.0 – the future is ours Epilogue References John H. Hagen
    • Scholarly CommunicationsToday – Where are we?  History of economics in scholarly publishing – John Houghton Estimating the Potential Impacts of Open Access to Research Findings / Economic Analysis & Policy, Vol. 39 No. 1, March 2009 Economic implications of alternative scholarly publishing models: Exploring the costs and benefits JISC EI-ASPM Project / A report to the Joint Information Systems Committee (JISC) – January 2009 The costs and potential benefits of alternative scholarly publishing models / Information Research, vol. 16 no. 1, March, 2011 John H. Hagen
    • Estimating the PotentialImpacts of Open Access toResearch Findings /Houghton There are two main conclusions from this analysis.  First, while there are many limitations, introducing accessibility and efficiency parameters into the standard returns to R&D approach offers one possible foundation for estimating the potential impacts of enhanced/open access.  Second, these preliminary estimates suggest that there may be substantial benefits to be gained from more open access. John H. Hagen
    • Economic implications of alternative scholarlypublishing models: Exploring the costs andbenefits JISC EI-ASPM Project / Houghton John H. Hagen
    • Economic implications of alternative scholarlypublishing models: Exploring the costs andbenefits JISC EI-ASPM Project / Houghton The costs, benefits and impacts of alternative scholarly publishing models revealed by this analysis demonstrate that research and research communication are major activities and the costs involved are substantial. Preliminary analysis of the potential benefits of more open access to research findings suggests that returns to research can also be substantial, and that different models for scholarly publishing can make a material difference to the returns realised, as well as the costs faced. It seems likely that more open access would have substantial net benefits in the longer term and, while net benefits may be lower during a transitional period they are likely to be positive for both OA publishing and self-archiving alternatives (i.e. Gold OA) and for parallel subscription publishing and self-archiving (i.e. Green OA). This suggests that there are gains to be realized from moving towards more open access publishing models and that, despite the lag between the costs and the realisation of benefits, the transition would probably be affordable within current system-wide budgetary allocations. John H. Hagen
    • The costs and potential benefits of alternativescholarly publishing models / HoughtonFigure 7: Estimated impact of open access self-archiving withoverlay production and peer review services (Pounds sterling inmillions over twenty years) John H. Hagen
    • The costs and potential benefits of alternativescholarly publishing models / Houghton The costs and benefits associated with alternative scholarly publishing models demonstrate that research and research communication are major activities and the costs involved are substantial. Our preliminary analysis of the potential benefits of more open access to research findings suggests that returns to research are also substantial and that different scholarly publishing models might make a material difference to the returns realised as well as the costs faced. It seems likely from this preliminary analysis that more open access could have substantial net benefits in the longer term and, while net benefits may be lower during a transitional period they would be likely to be positive for both open access journal publishing and self-archiving alternatives. It must be emphasised, however, that these calculations are not a prediction of what will occur in the future, and nor are they necessarily a recommendation that governments, funders or scholars follow a particular course of action. We merely illustrated the likely economic impacts of alternative scholarly publishing models. Finally, we emphasise that many of the figures we input into the model were derived from or estimates based on the literature. A version of the model we used is available on the Web (Economic implications of alternative scholarly publishing models (EI-ASPM) for third parties to input other data and explore other scenarios. John H. Hagen
    • History of Scholarly Publishing Scholarly Publishing Societies After Gutenberg’s printing press was operable, as of 1452... Cambridge and Oxford Universities, England Late 1400s, Oxford printed religious tracts Presses at each institution were established mid-1500s Harvard University, English Colonies Mid-1600s, printed some texts Harvard’s press was not established until much later (1913)  Scholarly Publishing in the U.S., Then and Now: A Brief History and Implications for the Future. Sue Ann Gardner / University of Nebraska - Lincoln John H. Hagen
    • History of Scholarly Publishing First University Presses Established in the U.S.  Johns Hopkins, 1878  University of Chicago, 1891  University of California; Columbia, 1893  Scholarly Publishing in the U.S., Then and Now: A Brief History and Implications for the Future. Sue Ann Gardner / University of Nebraska - Lincoln John H. Hagen
    • History of Scholarly Publishing James Bryant Conant, 23rd President, Harvard University, 1940s  Challenged the business model of the Harvard University Press and suggested that a commercial firm publish books on behalf of Harvard ...  “[I] might well be the executioner of the Harvard University Press ... Much as I feel if we were honest and brave, we would give up the Press, we cannot undertake the gruesome slaughter ... The death agonies would drag out for many years because of the nature of our contracts and many commitments.”  Scholarly Publishing in the U.S., Then and Now: A Brief History and Implications for the Future. Sue Ann Gardner / University of Nebraska - Lincoln John H. Hagen
    • History of Scholarly Publishing Academic Journals In time, by the early to mid-20th century, books were no longer the primary capital in academic discourse. Academic journals became the main tool for scholarly communication. University presses were just one producer of early journals; academic societies began to establish the corpus of scholarly journals. This often led to liaisons with the commercial publishing world.  Scholarly Publishing in the U.S., Then and Now: A Brief History and Implications for the Future. Sue Ann Gardner / University of Nebraska - Lincoln John H. Hagen
    • Citation Impact Factor andSocial Networking– Stevan Harnad et alo Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility on the social Web o Traditionally, scholarly impact and visibility have been measured by counting publications and citations in the scholarly literature. However, increasingly scholars are also visible on the Web, establishing presences in a growing variety of social ecosystems. But how wide and established is this presence, and how do measures of social Web impact relate to their more traditional counterparts? John H. Hagen
    • Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility onthe social Web / Harnad et al Comparison of traditional and alternative metrics in terms of author visibility A potential strength of altmetrics is that they track forms of impact not reflected in the citation record. Heavy bookmarking suggests that an article is being used or valued in some way; this impact is likely related to citation impact, but not identical. If this is true, it should be reflected in partial correlation between citations and bookmarks. This is in fact what we found in our sample articles, as shown in Table 3 and Figure 3 John H. Hagen
    • Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility onthe social Web / Harnad et alFigure 1: All tags assigned to articles published by Loet Leydesdorff. Figure 2: All tags assigned to articles published by Stevan Harnad John H. Hagen
    • Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility onthe social Web / Harnad et al Table 3. Correlations between citations and bookmarks for 1,136 documents. Spearmans ρ citations (Scopus) bookmarks (Mendeley) bookmarks (CiteULike) citations (Scopus) .448** .232** bookmarks (Mendeley) .448** .441** bookmarks (CiteULike) .232** .441** N=1136 **. Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2- tailed). John H. Hagen
    • Beyond citations: Scholars’ visibility onthe social Web / Harnad et al Figure 3: Relationships between log-normalized counts per article. John H. Hagen
    • Environment growth of marginal / area studies promotion & tenure glut of PHDs Publisher collusion inept editorial control questionable publication and business practices  monopolistic monographic and serials publishing John H. Hagen
    • Publication Bias  Publication bias in evidence-based medicine  Positive findings 2x more likely to be published than negative findings  This is research misconduct and fraudBen Goldacre: What doctors dont know about the drugs they prescribe John H. Hagen
    • Impediments to open access Monopolies and Oligopolies  Intellectual Property Legislation – SOPA, PIPA, FRPAA John H. Hagen
    • Impediments to open access Challenges of e-books and e-journals  Format compatibility issues, proprietary nature, leased access vs. ownership  Digital Working Group Pushes for Expanded Ebook Access  Federal Public Research Access Act  Threats to Digital Lending  Navigating the Ebook Revolution John H. Hagen
    • Impediments to open access Access to information, scholarly communications and human progress John H. Hagen
    • Ray Kurzweil:The Singularity John H. Hagen
    • ETDs and Scholarly publishing Intersection of economies and interests – the law of supply and demand Faculty as authors / University Promotion and Tenure and Research Generator vs. relationships with Publishers as commodities of exchange John H. Hagen
    • Fear and loathing in academiaX John H. Hagen
    • Fear and loathing in academia Research without Borders: Protests, Petitions and Publishing - Widening Access to Research in 2012, Columbia University, February 28, 2012 PHD2Published SPARC Resources John H. Hagen
    • The 99% - from Wall Street to the Academy John H. Hagen
    • The 99% - from Wall Street to the Academy John H. Hagen
    • Peter Diamandis:Abundance [via access] is ourfuture John H. Hagen
    • Evolution of Paradigms  IP law  Publisher practices  Author practices John H. Hagen
    • Conclusions Conclusions City 2.0 – the future is ours Epilogue References John H. Hagen
    • The City 2.0 – TED Prize Wish 2012 John H. Hagen
    • Humanity’s global challenges will be resolved when we are willing and able to look outward together in the same direction…”Life has taught us thatlove does not consist ingazing at each other butin looking outwardtogether in the samedirection.”-- Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, LePetit Prince (The Little Prince) John H. Hagen
    • References Ben Goldacre: What doctors dont know about the drugs they prescribe - http://www.ted.com/talks/ben_goldacre_what_doctors_don_t_know_about_the_drugs_they_prescrib e.html SPARC video – sign the White House petition - http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/ Open Access Now: Sign the White House Petition, Fake Elsevier Video - http://www.taxpayeraccess.org/ How Will Singularity Develop Over the Next 20 Years? – Ray Kurzweil (video) http://youtu.be/1uIzS1uCOcE Research without Borders: Protests, Petitions and Publishing - Widening Access to Research in 2012, Columbia University, February 28, 2012. http://youtu.be/7e1hxgdJK2U PhD2published http://www.phd2published.com/ Abundance Is Our Future – Peter Diamandis (video)  YouTube http://youtu.be/1uIzS1uCOcE  Ted Talks (translation options) http://www.ted.com/talks/peter_diamandis_abundance_is_our_future.html The City 2.0 (video)  Ted Talks http://blog.ted.com/2012/02/29/watch-the-ted-prize-wish-video/  Musical version http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cST7lJ-3HR8&feature=colike  With voice narrative http://thecity2.org/splash.php John H. Hagen
    • References Houghton, John. The costs and potential benefits of alternative scholarly publishing models. Information Research, vol. 16 no. 1, March, 2011. Anonymous. More Thoughts about the Academic Publishing Racket. Credit Bubble Stocks Blog. http://www.creditbubblestocks.com/2011/08/more-thoughts-about-academic-publishing.html Morrison, Ewan. The self-epublishing bubble. The Guardian, UK. http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2012/jan/30/self-e-publishing-bubble-ewan-morrison?CMP=twt_gu Morrison, Ewan. Are books dead, and can authors survive? The Guardian, UK. http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/aug/22/are-books-dead-ewan-morrison The Bubble In Academic Research. The Last Psychiatrist, February 16, 2009. http://thelastpsychiatrist.com/2009/02/the_bubble_in_academic_researc.html The Academic Bubble. Interorganisational - supply chain management, February 25, 2009. http://interorganisational.org/2009/02/25/the-academic-bubble/ The Unexamined Life is Not Worth Living [Blog article] / John H. Hagen http://renaissanceman1.blogspot.com/2012/03/unexamined-life-is-not-worth-living.html The Rich and the Rest of Us: A Poverty Manifesto / Tavis Smiley and Cornel West, SmileyBooks / Hay House, 2012. “An Academic Spring” / Barbara Fister. Libraries, May/June 2012, p.22. http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/04042012/academic-spring-updated Elsevier Open Access Choices http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/intro.cws_home/open_access Threats to Digital Lending, American Libraries, May/June 2012. http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/01122012/threats-digital-lending Navigating the Ebook Revolution, American Libraries, May/June 2012. http://americanlibrariesmagazine.org/features/05232012/navigating-ebook-revolution SPARC Resources. http://www.arl.org/sparc/resources/index.shtml John H. Hagen
    • Thank you!John H. HagenOpen Access Week 2012Hosted by Pontifical Catholic University, LimaLive event held in Lima, Peru and global WebcastOctober 24, 2012 John H. Hagen