National Conversation about Work
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National Conversation about Work

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    National Conversation about Work National Conversation about Work Presentation Transcript

    • The National Conversation about WorkSue O’Shea & Moana Eruera, EEO Advisors
    • The National Conversation about Work
      Major project involving talking to employers, employees and community groups
      Over 3000 people involved in 16 regions across New Zealand
      Including West Coast, Canterbury, Otago, Southland, Nelson/Marlborough/Tasman
      Started pre-recession
    • Impact of the recession on migrant employment
      Unemployment unevenly spread
      Kiwi first policy
      Change to skilled migrant categories
      Business owners employing fewer people
    • Recommendations
      Provide information on employment law and human rights in relation to employment for both migrant employers and migrant employees
      Develop codes of practice in partnership with industry groups to guide employers on best practices
    • Recommendations
      Monitor the working conditions of migrant workers, including those employed under the RSE scheme, with a view to taking remedial action when poor practice is identified
    • Myth 1: Work is nasty
      Overwhelmingly New Zealanders in a wide variety of work love their jobs
      People show enthusiasm and pride for the work they do
      Work is critical to identity and wellbeing
    • Myth 2: Bosses are bad
      Most bosses are decent and want to be fair
      Many bosses see their workers like family members
      Most bosses are responsive to workers needs
    • Myth 3: Workers are lazy
      Workers responded to job “spread”, new flexibilities to help employers in the recession
      Majority of workers work hard to get the job done well
    • Discrimination
      Access to work (pre-employment issues)
      On-the-job
      As part of communities
    • Language
      Speaking own language at work
      Intercultural understanding
    • Working conditions
      Long work hours
      Leave entitlements
      Pay and conditions
      Pastoral care (including accommodation)
    • Regional reports
    • www.neon.org.nz