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International Human Rights Law andCERD – The Framework for Civil Society             Participation                    Kris...
Outline and Aim• Outline International Framework for  Protection of Human Rights (including  reference to regional mechani...
Introductory Comments• The age of human rights – usually traced to the  Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UN 1948) – ...
UN Bill of Rights, Core Treaties   and Monitoring Bodies• ICERD - International Convention on the  Elimination of All Form...
Further Treaties• CEDAW - Convention on the Elimination of All  Forms of Discrimination against Women, 18 Dec  1979; OP, 1...
Further Treaties• ICRMW - International Convention on the  Protection of the Rights of All Migrant  Workers and Members of...
Regional Treaties•   Council of Europe•   Organisation of American States•   African Union•   League of Arab States
International and Domestic Law• State sovereignty• Monism and Dualism• International Human Rights Law and Impact  in Domes...
Role of CERD• Fundamental value of equality: made clear from both the  general (ICCPR and ICESCR) and the various speciali...
International Human Rights Law – 1. Treaty               Based Bodies• Human Rights Committee (CCPR)• Committee on Economi...
International Human Rights Law – 2.          Charter Based Bodies• Human Rights Council  – Universal Periodic Review – ie ...
Types of Work – Individual                 Complaints•   Complainants      – Any individual who claims that her or his rig...
Individual Complaints - cntd•   The CAT may consider individual communications relating to States    parties who have made...
Developments• Human Rights Council is establishing a complaint  procedure• The ICESCR has a monitoring committee, the CESC...
Types of Work – Inquiries• The Committee Against Torture and  theCommittee on the Elimination of  Discrimination Against W...
Types of Work – Country            Reports• Treaty monitoring bodies and country  reports: central obligation under the  v...
Role for NGOs and Civil Society• Supporting of individual complaints (eg  specialist law centres – Interights, Aire  Centr...
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Be heard by cerd

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Transcript of "Be heard by cerd"

  1. 1. International Human Rights Law andCERD – The Framework for Civil Society Participation Kris Gledhill Senior Lecturer, Faculty of Law, University of Auckland; Director, NZ Centre for Human Rights Law, Policy and Practice
  2. 2. Outline and Aim• Outline International Framework for Protection of Human Rights (including reference to regional mechanisms)• Role of CERD in this Framework• Outline of International Mechanisms• Introduction to Role of NGOs in the International Mechanisms
  3. 3. Introductory Comments• The age of human rights – usually traced to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UN 1948) – ie post WWII and post Great Depression of the 1930s: one of the first significant acts of the UN• UN Charter 1945 set out plans to develop human rights: the UN Economic and Social Council established a Commission on Human Rights, which was replaced in 2006 by the UN Human Rights Council)• Has also promulgated various human rights treaties.
  4. 4. UN Bill of Rights, Core Treaties and Monitoring Bodies• ICERD - International Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Racial Discrimination, 21 Dec 1965; CERD• ICCPR and Optional Protocols 1, 16 Dec 1966, and 2, 15 Dec 1989; HRC• ICESCR and Optional Protocol, 10 Dec 2008; CESCR
  5. 5. Further Treaties• CEDAW - Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, 18 Dec 1979; OP, 10 December 1999; CEDAW• CAT - Convention against Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or Punishment, 10 Dec 1984; OP 18 Dec 2002; CAT• CRC - Convention on the Rights of the Child, 20 Nov 1989; OP 1 (armed conflict) and OP 2 (trafficking), 25 May 2000; CRC
  6. 6. Further Treaties• ICRMW - International Convention on the Protection of the Rights of All Migrant Workers and Members of Their Families, 18 Dec 1990; CMW• CPED - International Convention for the Protection of All Persons from Enforced Disappearance, 20 Dec 2006; CPED• CRPD - Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, and OP, 13 Dec 2006; CRPD
  7. 7. Regional Treaties• Council of Europe• Organisation of American States• African Union• League of Arab States
  8. 8. International and Domestic Law• State sovereignty• Monism and Dualism• International Human Rights Law and Impact in Domestic Law: – Basic Obligation to Enforce (choice of means left to state) – Horizontal Effect• International stewardship through Human Rights Council and Treaty-based Committees – Monitoring, Complaints and Inquiries
  9. 9. Role of CERD• Fundamental value of equality: made clear from both the general (ICCPR and ICESCR) and the various specialist Conventions• CERD – Art 2 obligation to prevent racial discrimination (negative obligation) and encourage multiracial institutions (positive obligation)• Supplemented by various additional specifics: – Art 4 – duty to criminalise incitement to racist hatred and discrimination, and organisations based on such propaganda – Art 5 – need to ensure equality in relation to both civil and political rights and also economic social and cultural rights
  10. 10. International Human Rights Law – 1. Treaty Based Bodies• Human Rights Committee (CCPR)• Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (CESCR)• Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)• Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)• Committee against Torture (CAT) & Optional Protocol to the Convention against Torture (OPCAT) - Sub• Committee on the Rights of the Child (CRC)• Committee on Migrant Workers (CMW)• Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)• Committee on Enforced Disappearance (CED)
  11. 11. International Human Rights Law – 2. Charter Based Bodies• Human Rights Council – Universal Periodic Review – ie general review of manner in which a country lives up to its obligations under international human rights treaties; each state is reviewed every 4 years – Special Procedures of the Human Rights Council – looking at thematic issues around the World, or at the situations in particular countries
  12. 12. Types of Work – Individual Complaints• Complainants – Any individual who claims that her or his rights have under the covenant or convention have been violated by a State party to that treaty: may be represented• The Human Rights Committee may consider individual communications relating to States parties to the First Optional Protocol to the International Covenant on Civil and Political ; [NZ signed and ratified 1989; Australia in 1991]• The CEDAW may consider individual communications relating to States parties to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination A ; [NZ signed and ratified in 2000, Australia in 2008]
  13. 13. Individual Complaints - cntd• The CAT may consider individual communications relating to States parties who have made the necessary declaration under article 22 of the Convention Against Torture; [NZ made the declaration in 1989, Australia in 1993]• The CERD may consider individual communications relating to States parties who have made the necessary declaration under article 14 of the Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination; [NZ has NOT; Australia DID in 1993] and• The CRPD may consider individual communications relating to States parties to the Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. [NZ has NOT; Australia DID in 2009]
  14. 14. Developments• Human Rights Council is establishing a complaint procedure• The ICESCR has a monitoring committee, the CESCR – will be able to consider communications when the Optional Protocol of 2008 comes into force: [NZ has NOT signed this; nor has Australia]• The Convention on Migrant Workers also contains provision for allowing individual communications to be considered by the CMW; these provisions will become operative when 10 states parties have made the necessary declaration under article 77.
  15. 15. Types of Work – Inquiries• The Committee Against Torture and theCommittee on the Elimination of Discrimination Against Women may, on their own initiative, initiate inquiries if they have received reliable information containing well- founded indications of serious or systematic violations of the conventions in a State party.• Special Procedures - also involve investigations as part of their Human Rights Council mandate
  16. 16. Types of Work – Country Reports• Treaty monitoring bodies and country reports: central obligation under the various human rights treaties• Human Rights Council and Universal Periodic Review• Human Rights Council and Special Procedures (which can be country specific)
  17. 17. Role for NGOs and Civil Society• Supporting of individual complaints (eg specialist law centres – Interights, Aire Centre, MDAC)• Collating information to feed into inquiries• Shadow reporting process encouraged by both Human Rights Council (which allows civil society to set agenda) and Treaty Monitoring Bodies (which use shadow reports to test government accounts of progress)
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