Essay Writing Revision

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An explanation on how to write Essays for Level 3 History New Zealand Topic.

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Essay Writing Revision

  1. 1. Essay WritingLevel 2 and 3 History
  2. 2. A cunning Plan• You should always start your essay byfollowing a formula.• Try using the following:1. READ the question2. HIGHLIGHT the importantideas/dates/names.3. Construct a PLAN1. Mind Map2. Brainstorm3. Bullet Points4. NUMBER the points in logical order.5. WRITE! WRITE! WRITE!
  3. 3. Start at the Begininng1. READ the question.2. HIGHLIGHT the important ideas/dates/names.Explain the factors that led to the decision to present Maori with the Treaty ofWaitangi in 1840. Evaluate the consequences of the treaty signing for Maoriduring the nineteenth century.
  4. 4. Organise your ideas1. Construct a PLAN• Mind Map• Brainstorm• Bullet Points2. NUMBER the points inlogical order.the decision to present Maori with theTreaty in 1840.consequences of the treaty for Maoriduring the nineteenth century.HumanitarianConcernsLawlessness inKororarekaIllegalLand dealsLoss ofLandForeignInterest in NZLoss ofRangatiratangaNZWars1 234567MarginalisationFromSociety8
  5. 5. The Basic Essay• In general, essay writing is astraightforward exercise.• It requires the writer to take aviewpoint or argument and thenwrite a sustained justificationsupporting that idea.• You will have been taught thatEssays are made up of anIntroduction, a Body and aConclusion.
  6. 6. Saying it...• At University I was told that an essay is in three parts....• Saying what you will say.• Saying it.• Saying what you said.• I got my first ‘A’ when I tried it.
  7. 7. Introduction• The Introduction is where thewriter will outline theirviewpoint/argument and themain points that will be used tojustify their ideas.• Be Brief, the main points areonly indicators of what you willbe writing.• Short sentences always workbest.
  8. 8. Explain the factors that led to the decision to present Maori with the Treaty ofWaitangi in 1840. Evaluate the consequences of the treaty signing for Maori duringthe nineteenth century. (With annotations in italics)• “In 1840 Britain made the decision to annex New Zealand to Britain. The decision made bythe British representative Hobson, to do this through a treaty has left many consequencesover land, settlement and the Kingitanga for Maori during the nineteenth century.”• * In your introduction try to show the factors you will discuss later. This should start byhinting at the idea of Humanitarianism, Imperialism and Justice…and then theconsequences…. Loss of land & Mana, decline in population economic and political power.• In 1840 Britain chose to annex New Zealand through a Treaty because of events in the 1830’sthat occurred in here and in Europe. These included recognition of a letter, a declaration anda flag by British institutions. Humanitarian concerns included the negative effects thatcontact was having on Maori. Also the belief that systematic migration that would result inconflict. Interest being shown by other western nations was also a concern. The consequenceof the signing would see the extension of British authority into most parts of the country , thearrival of tens of thousands of migrants. Conflict with Maori led to significant declines intheir economic and political power.A weak Intro. Gives noreasons for the decisiononly names results withoutany detailMy Comment tothe studentWhile not perfect thisintroduction coversmost of the bases.
  9. 9. The Body• The Body is where thejustifications are made.• This is through LINKEDparagraphs.• In history the paragraphs arein a logical (usuallychronological) order that helpsto build your argument.• Each paragraph should be in aTEX(AS) format wheneverpossible.• AVOID pure narrative.
  10. 10. Avoid the Narrative Trap• In your essay you shouldconcentrate on explainingWHY events happened.• OR• The CONSEQUENCES of anevent• NOT JUST A DESCRIPTION ofwhat actually happened.• Examiners see excessivenarrative as ‘waffle’ whichthe student uses to disguisetheir lack of knowledge.
  11. 11. Spot the Narrative...• The primary aim of the humanitarian movement was to abolish slavery in all parts of theBritish world and to promote the rights and welfare of non-European peoples. The ChurchMissionary Society (the CMS) was a large and influential humanitarian organisation ofAnglican faith, based in London. In 1804, its reach extended to the developing colony of NewSouth Wales. It was from here that the highly prosperous and evangelical CMS agent,Samuel Marsden, cultivated an interest in the Maori people of New Zealand. Marsden was aman of success. In the year after moving to Sydney Cove in 1794, he had established athriving 100-acre farm block.• A year later, he had become a magistrate. Over the next few years, his ascendancy grew toinclude a growing estate and a large spiritual and political influence over the South Pacific.After holding the position of chaplain of New South Wales for over 10 years, Marsden grewdeeply tired of working with convicts. In New Zealand, Marsden saw a cause more worthy ofhis energies. This enthusiasm arose from the close relationships he shared with Maori chiefswho visited Sydney. From Te Pahi in 1805 and subsequent meetings with Maori, he saw awillingness to embrace the offerings of Europe. Marsden saw great potential in the Maori.He saw that they shared his entrepreneurial doggedness and would be worthy subjects ofthe CMS’ philosophy to “civilize and convert.” However, to Marsden’s distress, Maori werebeing exposed to what he would have seen as the evils of European society.
  12. 12. Identifying the narrative• The primary aim of the humanitarian movement was to abolish slavery in all parts of theBritish world and to promote the rights and welfare of non-European peoples. The ChurchMissionary Society (the CMS) was a large and influential humanitarian organisation ofAnglican faith, based in London. In 1804, its reach extended to the developing colony of NewSouth Wales. It was from here that the highly prosperous and evangelical CMS agent,Samuel Marsden, cultivated an interest in the Maori people of New Zealand. Marsden was aman of success. In the year after moving to Sydney Cove in 1794, he had established athriving 100-acre farm block.• A year later, he had become a magistrate. Over the next few years, his ascendancy grew toinclude a growing estate and a large spiritual and political influence over the South Pacific.After holding the position of chaplain of New South Wales for over 10 years, Marsden grewdeeply tired of working with convicts. In New Zealand, Marsden saw a cause more worthy ofhis energies. This enthusiasm arose from the close relationships he shared with Maori chiefswho visited Sydney. From Te Pahi in 1805 and subsequent meetings with Maori, he saw awillingness to embrace the offerings of Europe. Marsden saw great potential in the Maori.He saw that they shared his entrepreneurial doggedness and would be worthy subjects ofthe CMS’ philosophy to “civilize and convert.” However, to Marsden’s distress, Maori werebeing exposed to what he would have seen as the evils of European society.
  13. 13. Narrative-less• Below is the same text as previous slides without the excess narrative.• The primary aim of the humanitarian movement was to promote the rights andwelfare of non-European peoples. The Church Missionary Society (the CMS) was alarge and influential humanitarian organisation of Anglican faith, based in London.In 1804, its reach extended to the developing colony of New South Wales. It wasfrom here that Samuel Marsden, cultivated an interest in the Maori. Marsden sawa cause more worthy of his energies. From Te Pahi in 1805 and subsequentmeetings with Maori, he saw a willingness to embrace the offerings of Europe.Marsden saw great potential in the Maori. He saw that they shared hisentrepreneurial doggedness and would be worthy subjects of the CMS’ philosophyto “civilize and convert.”
  14. 14. T.E.X.A.S.• Topic - the main point/statement• Explanation - evidence thatsupports the statement.• eXample - an example that supportsthe explanation.• Analysis - how this idea links to themain argument.• Summary – How it links to your nextidea/paragraph.• Keep your sentence short.
  15. 15. T. E. X. A. S.• Below is the previous text broken into its TEXAS components.• The primary aim of the humanitarian movement was promote the rights and welfare of non-European peoples.• The Church Missionary Society (the CMS) was a large and influential humanitarianorganisation of Anglican faith, based in London. In 1804, its reach extended to thedeveloping colony of New South Wales.• It was from here that Samuel Marsden, cultivated an interest in the Maori. Marsden saw acause more worthy of his energies. From Te Pahi in 1805 and subsequent meetings withMaori, he saw a willingness to embrace the offerings of Europe.• Marsden saw great potential in the Maori.• He saw that they shared his entrepreneurial doggedness and would be worthy subjects ofthe CMS’ philosophy to “civilize and convert.”• The NEXT paragraph is on “Civilise and Convert”...
  16. 16. To Conclude...• The conclusion ties up all of yourideas and should prove that yourmain argument is true.• Repeat your main idea/argument.• Briefly reiterate your main pointswithout repeating too muchinformation.• If running short of time (<10 min)finish the paragraph you are on andmove to the conclusion.• Keep sentences short.

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