NYU Bridge and Spades Club Bridge Lessons - Intermediate
The Basics of Overcalling Opponents and the Introduction to Doubles Lesson 6
General Introduction - Overcalling <ul><li>So far, we’ve only learnt how to respond to opener and rebid opener’s hand. Ove...
Overcalling with NT <ul><li>When overcalling opponent’s opener, 1NT still means the same thing – 15-17 points, balanced </...
Overcalling with Suits <ul><li>A non-jump overcall at the 1-level shows 10+ points and 5+ cards in your suit </li></ul><ul...
1-2-3 stop <ul><li>It is not uncommon to see two partnerships fighting over partial scores. The 1-2-3 stop convention come...
General Introduction - Doubling <ul><li>The double is the X card in your bidding box while the redouble is the XX card </l...
Points System with Doubling (Undertricks) This table details the number of points a partnership loses per undertrick. E.g....
Points System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>When calculating the score of a made doubled contract, we fir...
Point System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>Example 1: 2H= vs 2HX= </li></ul><ul><li>2H= yields 2*30+50 = ...
Point System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>Example 2: 1C+2 vs 1CXX+2 </li></ul><ul><li>1C+2 yields 20+2*2...
Other Uses of X – Takeout X <ul><li>Doubling opponent’s suited (not NT) opener shows an opening hand with support for all ...
Other Uses of X – Negative X <ul><li>After partner’s opener, if RHO bids, you have an extra tool at your disposal – the ne...
Extension of Negative X <ul><li>After opponents’ opener and response with partner passing in the middle, X means 5-4 or be...
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Lesson 6 The Basics Of Overcalling Opponents And The Introduction To Doubles

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Lesson 6 The Basics Of Overcalling Opponents And The Introduction To Doubles

  1. 1. NYU Bridge and Spades Club Bridge Lessons - Intermediate
  2. 2. The Basics of Overcalling Opponents and the Introduction to Doubles Lesson 6
  3. 3. General Introduction - Overcalling <ul><li>So far, we’ve only learnt how to respond to opener and rebid opener’s hand. Overcalling opponents is another very important aspect of playing Bridge. </li></ul><ul><li>Overcalling opponents is the key to snatching partial scores. Sometimes, two highly distributional partnerships may even be fighting over makeable games! Refer to the note on cross-ruffing in Lesson 5 to see how this may be possible. </li></ul>
  4. 4. Overcalling with NT <ul><li>When overcalling opponent’s opener, 1NT still means the same thing – 15-17 points, balanced </li></ul><ul><ul><li>However, you must also hold a stopper in opponent’s suit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This does not hold if both opponents have bid. 1NT after opponents’ opener and response would be the sandwich NT, which will be taught in future </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Overcalling opponent’s weak 2 opener with 2NT shows the same thing as a 1NT opener, but sometimes with 18 points and with a good stopper in opponent’s suit </li></ul>
  5. 5. Overcalling with Suits <ul><li>A non-jump overcall at the 1-level shows 10+ points and 5+ cards in your suit </li></ul><ul><li>A non-jump overcall at the 2-level shows an opening hand and 5+ cards in your suit </li></ul><ul><li>A non-jump overcall at the 3-level shows either a distributional opening hand or a strong hand and 6+ cards in your suit </li></ul><ul><li>For more details on jump-shift overcalls, refer to Lesson 7 – Pre-empting </li></ul>
  6. 6. 1-2-3 stop <ul><li>It is not uncommon to see two partnerships fighting over partial scores. The 1-2-3 stop convention comes into play here (only for major suits) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(opponents’ bids are in red) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. 1S – 2S – 3S. 3S is not invitational. It is meant to make it hard for opponents to balance (another lesson) or compete. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. 1H – 1S – 2H – p – 3H. 3H is meant to stop the 1S bidder from possibly showing his hand further by bidding 2S. S is the boss suit here (stronger suit) so 1-2-3 stop becomes especially useful in such a situation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Responder must not bid again unless making a penalty X of opponent’s bid. So what’s doubling? Read on… </li></ul></ul>
  7. 7. General Introduction - Doubling <ul><li>The double is the X card in your bidding box while the redouble is the XX card </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You are only allowed to X opponents’ bids and XX opponents’ X </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The traditional use of doubles has been to double the stakes i.e. you double an opponent’s bid if you don’t think he can make and want him to lose (approximately) double the number of points and you redouble and opponent’s X if you think you can definitely make it </li></ul><ul><li>However it generally does not make sense to X an opponent’s bid at the 1 level, for example – it almost never goes down! Later in this lesson, we’ll see how to make use of X at lower levels. First, we’ll see how penalty doubles (traditional doubles) and redoubles work </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The other uses of redoubles will be detailed in a later lesson </li></ul></ul>
  8. 8. Points System with Doubling (Undertricks) This table details the number of points a partnership loses per undertrick. E.g. Going down 3 doubled in a non-vulnerable state will lose you 100+200*2 = 500 points, while going down 4 redoubled in a vulnerable state will lose you 400+ 600*3 = 2200 points! Non-vulnerable Vulnerable No X X XX No X X XX -1 50 100 200 100 200 400 -2/-3 50 200 400 100 300 600 -4 or more 50 300 600 100 300 600
  9. 9. Points System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>When calculating the score of a made doubled contract, we first double the trick points </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Quadruple the points for a redoubled contract </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Then, we recalculate the level and see if there is an applicable game level bonus </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You cannot get slam or GS bonuses from doubled/redoubled contracts </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Every doubled contract made gains 50 points (“insult” bonus) and every redoubled contract made gains 100 points </li></ul><ul><li>Every overtrick in a doubled contract makes 100 points (NV) or 200 points (vul) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Double these bonuses for redoubled contracts </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Point System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>Example 1: 2H= vs 2HX= </li></ul><ul><li>2H= yields 2*30+50 = 110 points normally </li></ul><ul><li>How many points will 2HX= yield? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First we double the trick points: 2*(2*30) = 120 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Then we recalculate the level. 2H doubled is essentially 4H so there is a game level bonus to add: 300 if non-vulnerable, 500 if vulnerable. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add a 50 point “insult” bonus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No overtrick points to add </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thus 2HX= yields 120+300+50 = 470 points NV or 120+500+50 = 670 points vul </li></ul></ul>
  11. 11. Point System with Doubling (Making/with Overtricks) <ul><li>Example 2: 1C+2 vs 1CXX+2 </li></ul><ul><li>1C+2 yields 20+2*20+50 = 110 points normally </li></ul><ul><li>How many points will 1CXX+2 yield? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>First we quadruple the trick points: 4*20 = 80 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Then we recalculate the level. 1C redoubled is essentially 4C so there is no game level bonus to add </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Add a 100 point “insult” bonus </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 overtricks will yield 2*200 = 400 points NV or 2*400 = 800 points vul </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Thus 1CXX+2 yields 80+100+400 = 580 points NV or 80+100+800 = 980 points vul </li></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Other Uses of X – Takeout X <ul><li>Doubling opponent’s suited (not NT) opener shows an opening hand with support for all the other suits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>In general, if opponent opened a major, a takeout X promises at least 4 cards in the unbid major </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If you have a very strong hand but only 1 or 2 long suits, you can choose to bid takeout X first, then clarify your hand later by bidding your suit </li></ul><ul><li>Takeout X is a forcing bid unless partner is very long in opponent’s suit or if your LHO bids before partner </li></ul><ul><li>Takeout X works for all suited (not NT) opening bids through 4H except 2C </li></ul>
  13. 13. Other Uses of X – Negative X <ul><li>After partner’s opener, if RHO bids, you have an extra tool at your disposal – the negative X </li></ul><ul><li>The negative X shows 4+ cards in all unbid majors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative X at 1 level: 6+ points </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative X at 2 level: 10+ points </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative X at 3 level: opening hand </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exception: after 1H-1S, negative X shows 4-4 minors or better. Points system still applies. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Extension of Negative X <ul><li>After opponents’ opener and response with partner passing in the middle, X means 5-4 or better in the two unbid suits </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative X at 1 level: 8+ points </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Negative X at 2 level: opening hand </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. LHO opens 1C, partner passes, RHO responds 1S. X here shows 8+ points and 5-4 or better in hearts/diamonds </li></ul></ul><ul><li>With this negative X, we will then usually consider suit overcalls of opponents’ opener and response to show 6+ cards and 10+ points instead of just 5+ cards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>E.g. LHO opens 1C, partner passes, RHO responds 1H. 1S here shows 6+ spades and 10+ points </li></ul></ul>

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