Fundamentals of Scientific Process
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Fundamentals of Scientific Process Fundamentals of Scientific Process Presentation Transcript

  • INFORMATION LITERACY
    Fundamentals of Scientific Process
  • YOUTUBE science Video
    Click:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq2zNgdokm4
  • What’s information literacy?
  • Information Literacy
    The ability to…
    FIND information
    EVALUATE information
    INCORPORATE information
    DOCUMENT information
  • Topics to Be Covered
    Identifying & Selecting Library Databases
    Popular vs. Scholarly Journals
    The Meaning of “Peer-Reviewed”
    Confirming peer-reviewed status
    Using Ulrich’s Periodicals Directory (Ulrichsweb)
  • Topics
    Database Search Strategies & Techniques I
    Selecting Keywords (Search Terms)
    Using Synonyms / Using a Thesaurus
    Understanding Controlled Vocabulary
  • Topics
    Database Search Strategies & Techniques II
    Boolean Operators: Using AND, OR, NOT
    Power Search Techniques & Shortcuts
    Using Parentheses
    Truncation
    Phrase Searching
    Basic Search vs. Advanced Search
  • Topics
    Using the NYIT Journal Locator
    A Journal Citation: Its Parts & Fields
    Interlibrary Loan: Books & Journal Articles
    Citing Journal Articles in APA / MLA Style
    The References Page
    Listing Your Sources Alphabetically
    Parenthetical References
  • Finding & SelectingNYIT Library Databases
    Start on the Library Home Page
  • The Library Home Pagehttp://www.nyit.edu/library
    Click to access 200+ databases
    Click to access 100,000+ books
  • Databases A-Z
    Grouped by subject
    Alphabetical listing
  • To Research Science TopicsMultidisciplinary Databases
    Two databases focusing on science topics:
    Science Direct
    Scitation(not listed here)
  • For Search Strategy WorksheetChoose one of these databases:
  • Popular vs. Scholarly Sources
    Identifying scholarly sources
  • Criteria to Apply
  • Peer-Reviewed Journals
    A peer-reviewed journal is scholarly
  • Peer-Reviewed
    Peer-reviewed = Screened by a panel of subject experts and found to meet stringent criteria of scholarship. A peer-reviewed journal contains articles that have been carefully evaluated for academic quality and deemed worthy of publication by a select group of subject authorities.
    Not precisely synonymous, these terms mean roughly the same thing as peer-reviewed:
    Scholarly / Refereed / Juried
  • Is This Journal Peer-Reviewed?Use Ulrich’s to Find Out
    Sample title in Ulrich’s
    Journal is shown to be Scholarly and Refereed
  • Database Search Strategies & Techniques I
    Keywords, Synonyms, Thesauri, Controlled Vocabulary
  • Let’s assume you have to write a research paper. You’ve chosen this topic:
    robotICS
    Near-future developments in…
  • Selecting Search TermsUsing Synonyms / Using a Thesaurus
    Database search engines look for SEARCH TERMS (keywords).
    These should correspond closely to your topic.
    The better your search terms, the better your search.
    Entering synonyms can be helpful when searching. A THESAURUS provides synonyms, words that mean the same thing. Look up “robots” to find synonyms that include:robotics, automaton, “mechanical man,” android, cyborgYour search can contain any or all of these terms.
  • Controlled Vocabulary / Subject Headings
    • Books and articles are categorized under subject headings.
    • This is “controlled vocabulary,” used to group different sources on the same topic TOGETHER under ONE specific term.
    • The Library of Congress Subject Headings List is one HUGE controlled vocabulary scheme – a vast attempt to organize virtually all human knowledge into a vast array of subject headings and subheadings.
  • Using Subject Headings Provided in Databases
    A keyword search in EBSCO produces this article. Its citation record reveals helpful Subject Terms, headings under which the article has been categorized. Clicking a term leads you to related articles categorized the same way.
    Click a subject term to find related articles.
    These can also be a good source of synonymous search terms.
  • Database Search Strategies & Techniques II
    Boolean LogicUsing Parentheses Truncation Phrase Searching Basic vs. Advanced Searching
  • Boolean Operators: AND, OR, NOTCombining & relating search terms----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------A = Dogs / B = Cats / Blue = Articles Retrieved
    AND narrows a search.
    OR broadens a search.
    NOT narrows a search.
    Articles discussingDogs OR Cats
    Articles discussingDogs AND Cats
    Articles discussingDogs NOT Cats
    I want articles that discuss both dogs AND cats.
    I want articles that discuss either dogs OR cats or both dogs and cats.
    I want articles that discuss dogs but NOT cats, i.e., that discuss dogs only.
  • A Possible Boolean Search
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    TOPIC: Near-future developments in robotics
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (robotics OR robots OR automatons) AND(developments OR evolution OR progress)
    OR connects SYNONYMS / AND combines CONCEPTS---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    More:
    PARENTHESES -- used to group and sequence operations
    TRUNCATION -- (robot* OR automatons)
    PHRASE SEARCH -- “developments in robotics”
  • Basic Search vs. Advanced SearchExample: Academic Search Complete
    A Basic Search is not necessarily easier and can be very precise – IF you know how to wield Boolean logic and choose your keywords carefully.
    A Basic Search done badly can be so broad that results are overwhelming in number – with many irrelevant “hits” to wade through.
    An Advanced Search typically provides many more ways to FILTER your results by different criteria (delimiters).
    An Advanced Search might well be called a Guided Search. A good advanced search can be easier to do than a good basic search.
    RECOMMENDED: Choose Advanced Search.
  • Basic Search Screen
    Note Search Delimiters / Criteria (10)
  • Advanced Search Screen
    Note (2) additional delimiters / criteria (Total: 12)
  • Field designators
    Truncation
    Synonyms + Boolean
    A possible Advanced Search on the sample topic
    Delimiters selected
  • Results (96 “hits” with keywords in titles)
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorFind link on Library home page
    Sample question answered by the Journal Locator: Do you have the journal GENOME, June 2007?
    Fill in the blank to see IF and WHERE the Library has a specific journal – either electronic/online in a database or in its print collection.
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorYou’re looking for Genome, June 2007.
    Step 1: Launch Locator, enter title you seek, click Search.
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorA list of locations appears.
    A results page appears, locating the full text journal in one or more Library databases.
    Let’s click on this database.
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorAccess the journal and the year you want.
    The journal record opens.
    Click open Genome 2007
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorOpen the specific issue you want.
    The year expands to list individual issues.
    Click here
  • The NYIT Journal LocatorWith the issue open, find your article – in full text.
  • Need a Journal the Library Doesn’t Have?
    Interlibrary Loans
    3 Complete & Submit
    1
    2
  • DOCUMENTING YOUR SOURCES:
    Citations & Parenthetical References
  • Citing Your Sources
    • Your research paper will incorporate ideas, concepts, quotes, etc., taken from your SOURCES.
    • In other words, you’ll use the thoughts and words of OTHERS in YOUR paper.
    • To avoid PLAGIARISM, you must CITE these sources.
    • That is, you must credit themwithin your paper with parenthetical references and list them at the end of your paper on a References page.
  • More on Citations (APA)
    • Each source listed on your References must be properly formatted in APA style.
    • EXAMPLE:Assume you quoted this journal article in your paper. This is how the citation would look:
    Shackell, J. (2010). Wired for war: The robotics revolution and conflict in the 21st century [Electronic version]. Air & Space Power Journal, 24(2), 95-96.
    • On your References page, list your sources alphabetically, usually by author’s last name.
  • More on Citations (MLA)
    • Each source listed on your References must be properly formatted in MLA style.
    • EXAMPLE:Assume you quoted this journal article in your paper. This is how the citation would look:
    Shackell, John M. “Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict
    in the 21st Century.” Air & Space Power Journal 24.2 (2010): 95-96.ProQuest. Web. 4 Aug. 2010.
    • On your References page, list your sources alphabetically, usually by author’s last name.
  • The Parts of an APA Journal Citation
    Author
    Year of publication
    Article Title / Subtitle
    Shackell, J. (2010). Wired for war: The robotics revolution and conflict in the 21st century [Electronic version]. Air & Space Power Journal, 24(2), 95-96.
    Pages
    Journal title
    Volume no. / Issue no.
    Database search engines can be directed to find search terms in a single part of a citation. In this case, parts are called fields. Example: Searching for “robotics” in article titles only is called a FIELD SEARCH.
  • The Parts of an MLA Journal Citation
    Author
    Article title / Subtitle
    Shackell, John M. “Wired for War: The Robotics Revolution and Conflict
    in the 21st Century.” Air & Space Power Journal 24.2 (2010): 95-96.ProQuest. Web. 4 Aug. 2010.
    Volume no.
    Pages
    Journal title
    Issue no.
    Database / Source / Date accessed
    Year published
    Database search engines can be directed to find search terms in a single part of a citation. In this case, parts are called fields. Example: Searching for “robotics” in article titles only is called a FIELD SEARCH.
  • A Sample References Page – APA Style
    Sources here are alphabetized by author’s last name.
    From: The Purdue Online Writing Lab
  • A Sample References Page – MLA Style
    Sources here are alphabetized by author’s last name.
    From: The Purdue Online Writing Lab
  • Apt Quote
    The longest journey begins with a single step. – Lao Tzu