Teachers Edition                                                                   Chapter 4Copyright © by SPOTS Education...
CHAPTER FOUR    In this chapter , students learn about the “teen numbers”: numbers 11 to 19. They are shown that these num...
“Winter”                                                                                                                  ...
4:1       Chapter 4 Lesson 1: Recognizing Numbers 11-19                                                 A NOTE TO THE TEAC...
Recognizing Numbers 11-19                                                                          Write the tens, pieces ...
4:2         Chapter 4 Lesson 2: Practice: Numbers to 19 GOAL:                                             CONCEPT DEVELOPM...
Practice: Numbers To 19                                                                                                   ...
4:3         Chapter 4 Lesson 3: Ordering and Comparing Numbers to Nineteen GOAL:                                          ...
Ordering And Comparing Numbers To 19                                                                          Connect the ...
4:4         Chapter 4 Lesson 4: Adding to an Addend of Ten GOAL:                                             CONCEPT DEVEL...
Adding To Ten                                                                          Write the addition sentence for eac...
4:5        Chapter 4 Lesson 5: Adding to Teen Numbers GOAL:                                          CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: ...
Adding To Teen Numbers                                                                          Add. Fill in the number se...
4:6       Chapter 4 Lesson 6: Adding Single Digits and Adding to Teen Numbers GOAL:                                       ...
Adding Single Digits And Adding To Teen Numbers                                                                          M...
4:7        Chapter 4 Lesson 7: Adding with Teen Addends GOAL:                                          CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT...
Adding With Teen Addends                                                                          Complete each math puzzl...
Chapter 4 till lesson 8 8.5x11
Chapter 4 till lesson 8 8.5x11
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Chapter 4 till lesson 8 8.5x11

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Transcript of "Chapter 4 till lesson 8 8.5x11"

  1. 1. Teachers Edition Chapter 4Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. CHAPTER FOUR In this chapter , students learn about the “teen numbers”: numbers 11 to 19. They are shown that these numbers have a“ten” and “pieces” (in this chapter we call the ones “pieces”). These numbers are represented by Teen Dot Cards that have onecomplete ten-frame and a second frame with the ones. The students learn to understand the value of, to recognize, and towrite the teen numbers. The chapter continues with adding to larger sums. First the students will solve equations that have ten as an addend (e.g.,10+4). Then they will solve equations that have a teen number as an addend (e.g., 14+3). These equations are shown on TeenDot Boards. The first group of addends is shown with black counters, and the second group of addends is shown with whitecounters. The teacher models the process while the students practice, using their own materials. Next are taught other addition equations with sums higher than ten (e.g., 9+5, 6+6). These are solved by splitting thesecond addend to complete the ten, and then adding the remainder to find the sum (e.g., 9+5 is solved by adding one tocomplete the ten, and adding the remaining four, for a sum of 14, or: 9+5=9+1+4.). The class learns and practices this concept by playing games that involve completing tens and seeing how many are left over.Then the teacher shows the process on Teen Dot Boards. The first addend is shown with black counters placed on the left side ofthe card, and the second addend with white counters placed on the right side of the card. The teacher turns some white countersto their black side to complete the ten, sees how many more there are, and finds the total, while describing his/her thinkingprocess. A “thinking number sentence” is written to show what was done. Thus, 9+5 is modeled on a Teen Dot Board with nineblack counters on the left side and five white counters on the right side. One white counter is turned to its black side to completethe ten, and four are left white. The sum, 14, is easy to see. The teacher describes the thinking process and writes the numbers 1and 4 under the five in the equation. This skill is applied to similar equations that have 6, 7, 8, and 9 as their first addends. The class adds the Teen Addition Dot Cards to their Dot Card collection, and these are reviewed daily. On the Teen AdditionDot Cards, the dots that are needed to complete the ten are shaded in. The students practice their new skills, first using theirTeen Dot Boards and counters, and then through the exercises in their math books. The students are taught to show this addition process on an open number line, by making two “jumps” on the number line.The first jump shows the amount added to complete a ten, and the second jump shows the amount left, to reach the final sum. The commutative property of addition (i.e., that addends may be added in any order without changing the sum) is appliedin this chapter. With this skill, the students can visualize the same Dot Card for equations with the same addends (e.g., 8+5 and5+8 are shown by the same Teen Addition Dot Card). Money concepts – combinations of a dime, nickels and pennies – andmath stories are used to reinforce and apply the skills learned. 4 Introduction to Chapter 4 GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Hand out a strip of ten “button” candies to the class, and one additional strip Students will be given a preview of with between one and ten candies to each child. Count the number of candies Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. Chapter 4: recognizing and adding numbers 11-19. on the “ten strip” together. Have each child count the number on his/her smaller MATERIALS NEEDED: button strip, and then have them count the candies on the two strips together. Say: If candies: strips of ten candies and you have 11 candies, raise your hand. [Ask one of the students with 11 candies strips of 1-9 candies, enough for to describe how the eleven is formed. Continue in this way until you reach 19 each student; small dolls: a group candies.] of ten dolls together, and ten Place the large Teen Dot Cards, in numerical order, on the board. Explain that individual dolls (you may use paper cutouts) they show the same numbers: ten and more – which we will call “ten and pieces.” Allow the students to eat the ten-candy strip, and divide the rest of the candies fairly for them to eat.116 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. “Winter” One cold winter day Ten girls were playing in the snow. Two girls came and asked: “Can we join and play?” Eleven, twelve- together they go! Twelve girls were playing in the snow. Two more girls came and asked: “Can we join and play?” Thirteen, fourteen- together they go! Fourteen girls were playing in the snow. Student Workbook page Two more girls came and asked: “Can we join and play?” Student Workbook page Fifteen, sixteen - together they go! Sixteen girls were playing in the snow. Two more girls came and asked: “Can we join and play?” Seventeen, eighteen - together they go! Eighteen girls were playing in the snow. Two more girls came and asked: “Can we join and play?” Nineteen, twenty - together they go! 107 107 108 108 USING THE BOOK: Pages 107-108 Page 107: What do you see on the page? [As the students answer, explain each part:] INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: In what season does it snow and we can build snowmen? [winter] What season are we in So far, we’ve learned about numbers one to ten. In Chapter 4 we will learn now? about the teen numbers. Read the numbers in the upper left-hand corner. Point out that all these numbers have two digits. The first digit of each number is a one. Explain that these can be called “teen numbers.” The purse has a new coin in it: the dime. The dime is worth ten cents. Count the value of the THINKING TRIGGER: group of coins. Which numbers do you think areCopyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. The cards are Teen Dot Cards. They show us the teen numbers. Can you figure out what called the “teen numbers”? [Suggest numbers the cards show? looking at the number line or hundred chart for help.] On the bottom is a teen addition card. [Place a 16 Teen Dot Card on the board. Tell the class that the card shows 16. Add three white counters. Ask:] How many are there altogether? [19] [Find the equation in the book, and read it to the class.] CLOSING STATEMENT: The number line shows the same number sentence: 16+3=19. We are gong to learn all this in Page 108: Read the poem and discuss it with the class. Use a group of ten dolls and Chapter four! additional, individual dolls to model the story. 117 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. 4:1 Chapter 4 Lesson 1: Recognizing Numbers 11-19 A NOTE TO THE TEACHER: Since this lesson is a continuation of the GOAL: introduction to the chapter, there are differences in its format. Students will be introduced to the base-10 number system as it applies CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: to the teen numbers. Show the class thirteen magnetic counters. Count them together and place ten MATERIALS NEEDED: blank dot counters on a blank Dot Board. Have the class do the same: count out thirteen board; blank double dot boards counters and place ten counters on a blank Dot Board. (large ones and for students) magnetic counters; student Point to the group of ten and explain that we can call this a “ten.” Show the counters leftover counters and explain that we will call them “pieces.” Together, count the “pieces” to see that everyone has the same amount. Point out that these are like the button candies they ate before – a group of ten candies and some more. INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: Say: How do we write thirteen? [1 and 3] [Write the number 13 on the board.] We Now we will start our new chapter. write a 1 because we have 1 ten, and we write a 3 because we have 3 pieces. That Today we will learn how to read teen makes thirteen in all. [Point to the digits as you speak. Gesture with your hand numbers, and also how to write and around the number to show that the two digits together become one number show teen numbers. that represents thirteen] Repeat with the number 16. Write the number 14 on the board. Ask the class how you can show it with your counters. Show it with your “ten” and four pieces, and have the class do the same with their counters. Remove the four pieces.Write the numeral 17 on the board. Ask how you can show that number using the ten-board and counters. Have the studentsdo the same with their ten-boards and counters. Do this again with 19.Display a blank double dot board. Explain that we can use this to show teen numbers in a clear way. Show eighteen magneticcounters. Organize the eighteen counters on the Dot Board and explain that you are filling the ten and then the pieces. Askhow many tens and pieces there are, and point out that it is now easier to see what the number is. Hand out the blank doubledot boards to the class.Draw a chart with three columns. Label the columns tens, pieces, and number. Ask the class to put a ten and three pieces ontheir boards. Ask them to tell how many tens, how many pieces, and what number it shows. Fill in the chart. Repeat with 15,17, and 12. tens pieces number 1 3 13 1 5 15Write teen numbers on the chart, read them, and have the class use counters to show the numbers on their blank double dot Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.boards. For each number, ask the class to tell you how many tens and how many pieces there are, and write it on the chart.As you fill in the chart, ask: What do you see that’s the same in all these numbers? [they each have a one] Why? [because they eachhave 1 ten!] What does the second number tell us? [the number of pieces]Continue in this way with additional teen numbers until the pattern is clear to the students. Be sure to include the number 10(one “ten” and zero “pieces”).Review the chart. For each number, read, for example, “One ten and seven pieces [Point to the digits as you speak]; seventeenin all.”Show the class the Teen Dot Cards.104 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. Recognizing Numbers 11-19 Write the tens, pieces and total number for each Dot Card. Write the tens, pieces and total number for each Dot Card. 1. 2. 1. 2. Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number 3. 4. 3. 4. Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number Student Workbook page Write all ways to make 10. You can use counters to help. Student Workbook page 1. + = 2. + = 5. 6. 3. + = 4. + = 5. + = 6. + = Tens Pieces Number Tens Pieces Number 7. + = 8. + = 9. + = 10. + = 109 109 110 110 CONCLUSION: Now we’ve learned how to show bigger numbers on our Dot Cards. USING THE BOOK: Pages 109-110 Page 109: Read the directions. For the first few examples, place a sample Teen Dot Card on the board showing each example’s number, and ask the students to tell how many tens, how many pieces, and the total number. Write the answers on the board under the Teen Dot Card and have the class fill it in, in their books. The page can be completed independently and reviewed together. Page 110: For each section, read the directions and have the students complete theCopyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. section on their own. Review the page together. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we used Teen Dot Cards to show numbers 11-19. We learned to show a ten and pieces for each number. Tomorrow we will learn more about this. 105 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. 4:2 Chapter 4 Lesson 2: Practice: Numbers to 19 GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Place Dot Cards 11-19 on the board in a line. Show number cards 11-19 to the Students will reinforce their understanding of teen numbers class and have them tell you under which Dot Card to place each one. and the base-10 system. Choose a teen number card, and write the number on the board. Ask the students MATERIALS NEEDED: Popsicle which digit shows the “ten,” and circle it in red. Ask which shows the amount of sticks: 19 for each student; rubber “pieces,” and circle that in blue. Repeat this several times with different numbers. bands; poster boards Drop- Its Have the students fold a paper in four, cut on the folds, and write a teen number handout #1 of their choosing on each piece. In random order, call a number by telling the amount of tens and pieces. The students with that number are to raise up the correct paper for everyone to see. For example, you may call, “One ten and three QUICK PRACTICE: pieces.” Any student who wrote “13” raises the paper with that number on it. Be Drop-Its: Pass out the Drop-Its sure to say all the numbers. handout. Flash the Teen Dot Cards. Have the students write the correct Distribute nineteen popsicle sticks and a rubber band to each student. Count number on their worksheets. Check the sticks together to check that each student has the correct amount. While the students’ work. you model, have the children count ten sticks and wrap them in a rubber band.)) Remember to show each card for only one This group is the “ten.” Count the number of sticks that are left. Explain that these second! are the “pieces.” (This activity may be done with colored matchsticks and small rubber bands instead.) Write the number “13” on the board. Read the number, and ask the class to show INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: this number with sticks. Lead them to conclude that they can use their “ten” and Yesterday we used Dot Cards to show three pieces. numbers 11-19. Today we will learn more about these numbers. Repeat this with additional numbers. Remind the class of the even-odd rule: in even numbers, the dots all have a partner, and in odd numbers, one dot is alone. Use the 1-10 Dot Cards to demonstrate. Present the Teen Dot Cards. Explain that the ten in the number THINKING TRIGGER: doesn’t change anything. Circle the even-number Dot Cards in one color and the odd-number Dot Cards in another color. Point out the pattern (every other Place the Teen Dot Cards on the number is even/odd). board in two groups. In one group place the even numbers, and in the other group place the odd STUDENT TEACHER: numbers. Ask: Can anyone think of Divide the class into large groups. Give each group a poster board, and have why I divided the cards in this way? each group list the numbers from 10 to 19 on their board and to paste their What is the same in each group? sticks onto it to show the teen numbers. Hang the posters in a prominent place Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. in your classroom. CONCLUSION: Now we know a lot about the teen numbers.106 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. Practice: Numbers To 19 Write the number. = 10 Candies 1. 2. 3. Write how many. Thirteen Fourteen Seventeen 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Nineteen Twelve Eighteen 7. 8. 9. 4. 5. 6. Eleven Sixteen Fifteen Fill in the missing numbers. Color each box that has and even number. Draw the missing candies for each teen number. 10. 7. 8. 9. Student Workbook page 11 15 17 Student Workbook page 11. 12. 13. 19 14 11 ___Tens ___Tens ___Tens 15 ___Pieces 16 ___Pieces 12 ___Pieces Circle the number that shows how many pieces . 10. 11. 12. 16 14 19 Circle the number that shows how many tens . 13 What does the 13 tell me? What does the tell me? 17 What does the 17 tell me? What does the tell me? 13. 14. 15. 17 13 18 111 111 112 112 USING THE BOOK: Pages 111-112 Page 111: Look at the top of the page together, read and discuss the candy roll. Explain that it holds ten candies and that it is just like a “ten.” For each section, read and explain the directions. Have the students complete the sections on their own while you offer help as needed. Review the page together. Page 112: Examples1-9: Read each number word and allow time for the children to write the number in digits. Example 10: Read the directions and have the class complete the number line independently. Examples 11-12: Ask the students to think of what needs to be done here. Explain the CLOSING STATEMENT:Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. directions, and have the students complete this section on their own. Who can tell us what we learned Bottom of the page: Read and discuss each example. today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned and practiced numbers 11-19. We learned about odd and even teen numbers, and we practiced tens and pieces. Tomorrow we will learn to order and compare teen numbers! 107 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. 4:3 Chapter 4 Lesson 3: Ordering and Comparing Numbers to Nineteen GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Place number cards 1-19 on the board so that you have a line of numbers 1-19. Students will order and compare numbers to nineteen Read the numbers together. Students will identify the teen Show Dot Cards 1-19 to the class and have them tell you under which number numbers as odd or even numbers. card to place each one. Students will count by twos to 20. Point to various number cards and/or Dot Cards and ask which one is greater MATERIALS NEEDED: number or less. Point out that the teen numbers are always greater than the single digit cards 1-20; small snacks; stickers; numbers because they have a ten in them. strips of paper Ask the class to tell you which numbers are odd and circle them in one color, and which are even and circle them in another color. Pass out number cards 1-20 in random order to twenty students standing in a QUICK PRACTICE: line. Help the children who did not receive a number move the other students Flash the Teen Dot Cards. Have the until they are standing in numerical order. class identify each one in unison. Together, count from one to twenty. As you count, have the child who has that)) Remember to show each card for only one second! number raise it up. Tell the class that now you will count in a different way: you will “skip count” and count by two’s. Count by two’s and have the child whose number you say jump up as you count. After you count, ask the children whose number you did not INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: say to place their cards on your desk and those who you did say to place their So far we learned to recognize the cards on the board. teen numbers and the Teen Dot Cards. Today we will do different things with Together with the class practice counting by two’s by chanting, showing the these numbers. numbers on the board, with fingers, on Dot Cards, etc. Pass out 20 small snacks (cereal, carrot pieces, peanuts, etc.) to each child. Model counting the items by two’s and then have the children do the same. Place number cards 1-20 on the board in numerical order. THINKING TRIGGER: STUDENT TEACHER: Write numbers 9 and 13 on the board. Ask: Which of these numbers Divide the class into groups of five. Give each group a strip of paper and give is greater? How can you tell? each child four stickers. Have each child take turns pasting rows of two stickers so that there are ten rows of two stickers each. Next to each row, have him/her write the number of stickers there are. Have each group show their strip to the class and count the stickers by two’s. Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. You can paste all the strips to a poster board, label it “We can count by two’s” and hang it on your math bulletin board. CONCLUSION: Now we know which number is greater, to count in order from 1-20 and how to skip- count by two’s.108 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. Ordering And Comparing Numbers To 19 Connect the dots from 1 to 19. Color the mitten that has the number that is greater . 1. 2. 3. 13 16 19 18 9 11 Color the mitten that has the number that is less . 4. 5. 6. 15 12 14 17 8 13 Color the mitten that has the odd number. 7. 8. 9. 18 11 17 12 14 19 Color the mitten that has the even number. Student Workbook page Student Workbook page 10. 11. 12. Write the number before and the number after. 1. 2. 3. 16 13 14 15 12 19 11 15 17 ¢ Count by 2’s. 4. 5. 6. 14 18 10 2 4 8 14 20 113 113 114 114 USING THE BOOK: Pages 113-114 Page 113: Connect the Dots: Read the directions. If necessary, remind the class how to complete this. Give help as needed. Examples 1-6: Read the directions. Do the first two examples together. Refer to the number line on the board. Have the class complete the section on their own while you offer help as needed. Review the page together. Page 114: Read each set of directions together. Do the first example in each section and have the class complete it on their own. Review together.Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned to tell which number is greater and which is less, to put the numbers in order and to count by two’s. Tomorrow we will learn addition. 109 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  10. 10. 4:4 Chapter 4 Lesson 4: Adding to an Addend of Ten GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Place a blank Teen Dot Card on the board. Refer to the equation 10+4=___ and Students will solve addition equations in which one addend is ask: How can we show this equation on the Teen Dot Card? [Have students direct ten. you to place ten black counters and four white counters on the card.] What MATERIALS NEEDED: equation number does this look like? [14] [Write the sum, show the class Dot Card 14, and cards with addition equations that compare.] have ten as an addend In a similar way, write, show, and solve other addition equations that have ten as an addend. Now I will tell a math story. I have ten crayons and my friend has five crayons. How QUICK PRACTICE: many do we have in all? What is the number sentence? [Write 10+5=___ on the Drop-Its: Pass out the Drop-Its board.] What is the answer? [Write 15 , and fill in the sum.] handout. Flash the Teen Dot Cards. In the same way, tell other math stories that have ten as an addend. Have the students write each number on their papers. Check the Clear the board. Place a blank Teen Dot Board on the board. Place ten black and students’ work. four white counters on the board. Draw an open number line. Ask: How can we)) Remember to show each card for only one show this equation on the number line? Which number shall I start with? [With the second! class’s assistance, fill in the number line.] What is the number sentence for this? [Write 10+4=14 on the board.] In a similar way, display other adding-to-ten equations on Dot Boards, and show INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: the equations on open number lines. Yesterday we practiced ordering and comparing numbers to 19. Today we STUDENT TEACHER: will learn how to add ten and another Ask two students to come to the board. Have one student choose an addition number. equation card learned in this lesson and tell a math story with the card. Have the other student explain how to solve it using an open number line. CONCLUSION: THINKING TRIGGER: We learned to add two numbers when one of those numbers is a ten. Write the equation 10+4=___ on the board. Read the equation and ask: What do you think the sum is? How did you figure that out? Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.110 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. Adding To Ten Write the addition sentence for each Dot Card. Add. Complete the number line. 1. 1. 2. 10 + 2 = +2 10 2. 10 + 6 = + = = +6 3. 4. 10 3. 10 + 3 = = = 4. Student Workbook page Student Workbook page Solve the story problem. Draw a picture to label your answer. 10 + 5 = Then write the number sentence. 5. There are 10 hats in a box. There are 3 hats on the shelf. 5. How many hats in all? ____ 10 + 9 = = 115 115 116 116 USING THE BOOK: Pages 115-116 Page 115: Examples 1-4: Read the directions. Have the students complete the section on their own while you offer help as needed. Review the section with the class. Example 5: Read the directions and the story problem. Have the students fill in the answers on their own, and discuss. Page 116: Read the directions and have the students complete the page on their own while you offer help. Review together.Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned number sentences that have ten plus another number. Tomorrow we will learn to add to teen numbers. 111 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  12. 12. 4:5 Chapter 4 Lesson 5: Adding to Teen Numbers GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Place a blank Double Dot Board on the board. Refer to the equation 14+3=___, Students will solve addition equations in which an addend and and ask: How can we show this equation on the Teen Dot Card? [Have students the sum are teen numbers. direct you to place fourteen black counters and three white counters on the MATERIALS NEEDED: addition card.] What number does this look like? [17] [Write the sum, show the class Dot flash cards; magnetic counters; Card 17, and compare.] students’ wipe-off number Write 16+3=___ on the board. Place Dot Card 16 next to the equation, and ask sentence boards; addition equation the class how to show the number sentence. Place three white counters on the cards with equations learned in this card, ask the class how many there are altogether, and write the sum. lesson Continue with additional equations. Ask the class with which Dot Card to start, and how many white counters to add. Ask how many there are altogether, and QUICK PRACTICE: fill in the sum. Drop-Its: Pass out Drop-Its handout Using black and white counters, form Addition Dot Card 15+3 on the board. Ask #3. Flash 10-15 Addition flash Cards. the class to tell you its number sentence. Have the students write the answers on their papers. Check the students’ Repeat this with additional Teen Addition Dot Cards. Have the class write the work. equations on their wipe-off number sentence boards. Note: When presenting equations make sure your second addend is less than INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: the number of “pieces” in your teen number. i.e. present 16+2 and not 12 + 6. Yesterday we added ten plus another STUDENT TEACHER: number. Today we will add to teen numbers. Have students, in turn, choose an equation card learned in this lesson and solve it using Dot Cards. Have each student explain what he/she is doing and why. CONCLUSION: THINKING TRIGGER: Today we learned to add to teen numbers. Write the equation 14+3=___ on the board. Ask: What do you think this Addition Dot Card will look like? Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.126 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. Adding To Teen Numbers Add. Fill in the number sentence. Fill in the number sentence. 1. Add 2 dots. 2. Add 4 dots. 1. 2. = = = = 3. Add 4 dots. 4. Add 3 dots. 3. 4. = = = = Student Workbook page Student Workbook page 5. 6. 5. Add 2 dots. 6. Add 3 dots. = = = = 117 117 118 118 USING THE BOOK: Pages 117-118 Page 117: Read the directions. Review example 1 together. Have the students complete the page on their own while you offer help as needed. Review the page together. Page 118: Read the directions. Ask a student to explain what needs to be done, and have the students complete the page on their own while you offer help. Review together.Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned to add to teen numbers. Tomorrow we will learn more about this, plus a trick that will help us add to teen numbers more quickly. 127 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  14. 14. 4:6 Chapter 4 Lesson 6: Adding Single Digits and Adding to Teen Numbers GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: Refer to the first addition equation pair on the board (14+3 and 4+3). Place Students will use what they know about adding single-digit numbers corresponding Addition Dot Cards next to the equations, and compare them. to solve equations with a teen (Make the 14+3 card using counters.) Ask: What is the same about these two addend. Addition Dot Cards? [They have the same number of pieces.] What is different? MATERIALS NEEDED: Drop-Its [The first card also has a “ten.”] Let’s find the sum of each. [Write each sum next to handout #3; Addition Flash Cards; its equation.] The sums are also similar. They each have seven pieces, but the first magnetic counters; sheets of paper number sentence has a ten, so it equals 17. In the same way, use Dot Cards to solve and compare the second equation pair (16+1 and 6+1). QUICK PRACTICE: Refer to the equation 15+2 in the third equation pair. Say: I am going to use what Drop-Its: Pass out Drop-Its handout I know to solve this number sentence. [Point to the equation 5+2.] I know that 5+2 #3. Flash 10-15 Addition Flash equals seven. [Write 7 next to the equation.] I know that 15+2 is similar, but it has a Cards. Have the students write the ten. So if 5+2=7, then 15+2 =17. [Use Dot Cards to show the equations.] answers on their papers. Check the students’ work. Write additional equation pairs, and solve them while describing your thinking process, as above. STUDENT TEACHER: INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: Divide the class into pairs. Hand out sheets of paper. Have each pair choose Yesterday we added to teen numbers. some teen addition equations, write the addition pairs, and solve the equations Today we will learn to use what we already know about adding to help while explaining their thinking processes to their partners. us add teen numbers more quickly. You may hang these papers on your math bulletin board. CONCLUSION: Today we learned a way to help us add to teen numbers. THINKING TRIGGER: Write equation pairs on the board: 14+3 and 4+3; 16+1 and 6+1; 15+2 and 5+2. Ask: What is similar about these equations? [Do not solve the equations.] Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.128 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. Adding Single Digits And Adding To Teen Numbers Match. Write the sum. Add. Complete the number line. 1. 1. 2. 15 + 4 = 6+ 3= 17 + 2 = +4 15 16 + 3 = 7+ 2= 2. 3. 4. 16 + 3 = 15 + 3 = 14 + 2 = +3 16 5+ 3= 4+ 2= 3. 14 + 2 = 5. 6. 15 + 4 = 5+ 2= 14 5+ 4= 15 + 2 = 4. Student Workbook page Student Workbook page 13 + 3 = Add. 7. 8. 9. 10. 1 11 3 13 2 12 2 12 __ +5 __ __ +5 +6 __ __ +6 +4 __ __ +4 +5 __ +5 5. 6. 8+ 2= 6+ 3= 119 119 120 120 USING THE BOOK: Pages 119-120 Page 119: Read the directions. Review example 1 together. Have the students complete the page on their own while you offer help as needed. Point out the change in format from example 7. Review the page together. Page 120: Read the directions. Ask a student to explain what needs to be done, and have the students complete the page on their own while you offer help. Review together. Closing Statement: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned that we can think of number sentence pairs to help us add to teen numbers.Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned that we can think of number sentence pairs to help us add to teen numbers. 129 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  16. 16. 4:7 Chapter 4 Lesson 7: Adding with Teen Addends GOAL: CONCEPT DEVELOPMENT: On the board, list the following equations: 4+5; 6+3; 3+6; 5+4. Ask: Which Students will apply the commutative property of addition to equations number sentences go together? Why? [Because when we are adding, we can add that have a teen addend. the numbers in any order and get the same sum.] [Draw a line to connect the MATERIALS NEEDED: math equation pairs, or circle them in the same color. Then erase the equations.] puzzles On the board, list the following number sentences: 10+4=___; 16+3=___; 11+2=___; 15+4=___. Using Teen Dot Cards and counters, solve them together, and write the sums. QUICK PRACTICE: Next to the above equations, list the following number sentences: 3+16=___; Drop-Its: Pass out Drop-Its handout 4+10=___; 4+15=___; 2+11=___. #3. Flash 10-15 Addition flash Cards. Read the first equation in the second group of number sentences and ask the Have the students write the answers class: Which of the number sentences that we’ve already solved can help us solve on their papers. Check the students’ work. this one? Why? [Write the sum.] If necessary, remind them of the rule they learned earlier: When adding, we can add the numbers in any order. In the same way, match and solve the remaining equations. INTRODUCTORY STATEMENT: Yesterday we learned a way to add to Draw four number puzzles. With students’ help, fill them in with the equations teen numbers. Today we will learn to on the board. use a rule that we learned before to Draw an additional math puzzle. Fill it with numbers: 15, 12, 3. Ask the class to help us add to teen numbers. help you write two addition sentences for this puzzle. Do the same with numbers 19, 9, 10. Draw two additional puzzles, and fill in only the addends (parts): 4, 15 for one THINKING TRIGGER: puzzle, and 10, 5 for the other, leaving the sum (whole) puzzle piece blank. Draw or place on the board a blank Together with the class, write the two number sentences for each puzzle, and math puzzle. Review the parts of the solve them. puzzle (whole, part, part). Challenge the class to think of a way to fill in STUDENT TEACHER: the puzzle so that at least one of the Hang a blank math puzzle on the board. Have a student fill in the puzzle according numbers is between 11 and 19. to the class’s directions, and write two addition sentences for the puzzle. Help the student explain why various numbers that students suggested are correct or incorrect for this puzzle. CONCLUSION: Today we practiced adding to teen numbers, and we reviewed the rule that when we Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. add, we can add the numbers in any order.130 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. Adding With Teen Addends Complete each math puzzle. Add. In each row, color the shovels with the same totals. Write the addition sentences. You can use the Dot Cards to help. 1. 2. 3. 9 10 4 15 3 16 ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ 1. 2. 3. 4. 4. 5. 6. 3 + 4 = __ 13 + 4 = __ 4 +10 = __ 4 +13 = __ 5 10 2 17 7 10 ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ 5. 6. 7. 8. ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ ___ + ___ = ___ Add. In each row, circle the scarves with the same totals. 7. 8. 9. 3 + 6 = __ 13 + 6 = __ 6 +13 = __ 6 +10 = __ 4 + 10 = 12 + 4 = 10 + 4 = Student Workbook page Student Workbook page 9. 10. 11. 12. 10. 11. 12. 13 + 2 = 15 + 3 = 3 + 15 = 4 + 3 = __ 15 + 3 = __ 3 +15 = __ 4 + 10 = __ 13. 14. 15. 16 + 3 = 14 + 3 = 3 + 16 = 13. 14. 15. 16. 16. 17. 18. 10 + 5 = 5 + 10 = 10 + 4 = 5 + 4 = __ 14 + 5 = __ 6 + 4 = __ 5 +14 = __ 121 121 122 122 USING THE BOOK: Pages 121-122 Page 121: Examples 1-6: Read the directions. Review example 1 together. Have the students complete the section on their own while you offer help as needed. Examples 6-18: Read the directions. Review the first examples together. Ask a student to explain why examples 6 and 8 are circled. Have the students complete the section on their own. Review the page together. Page 122: Read the directions. Ask a student to restate what needs to be done, and have the class complete the page independently while you offer help. Review together. )) You may request that the students bring a collection of coins to class tomorrow. (See “materials needed” in lesson 8.)Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved. CLOSING STATEMENT: Who can tell us what we learned today? [Accept relevant answers.] Today we learned that when we add with teen numbers, we can add the numbers in any order. 131 Copyright © by SPOTS Educational Resources. All rights reserved.

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