Making the Financial Case for
Genealogical Librarianship
Fast and Affordable Methods for Training Genealogy Staff
Presente...
A series of interconnecting talks…
Assumptions
That some training is necessary & desirable
That your new staff knows nothing about family
history
That this t...
Break it down.
It’s modular!
Do, re, mi…
Module 1
What are genealogy and family history?
Lesson:
A quick overview of genealogy and family
history will define these terms and provide the
big picture.
Homework:
Crash Course in Genealogy
“…a guided tour by flying
over genealogy research at
20,000 feet.”
OR
Family History 101
PLUS
“What’s in a Name?”
Chapter 4 of
Unpuzzling Your Past
They can consult:
Cost?
Free
The Confidence Booster…
Module 2
What They Already Know
Lesson:
Many sources used in genealogy reference are
sources already used in regular reference
service.
Activity: reference tour
--phone, crisscross and city directories
--BGMI and the biographical sources it indexes
--back is...
Cost?
One hour x 2 = 2 hours
The Fork in the Road…
Module 3:
Searching vs. Researching
Lesson:
There is a big difference between searching for
previously compiled and published
information, and researching sou...
Where to search?
Look for published genealogies on World Cat,
Familysearch.org, GB, Internet Archive, and at
the Library o...
More searching activities
The WorldConnect Project at
Rootsweb.ancestry.com and werelate.org.
Message boards at Rootsweb a...
Cost?
2 hours
The Whac-A-Mole™ Game…
Module 4:
Where to Search
Overarching lesson:
Sources are located in a variety of often-
changing locations, and many of the needed
sources will be ...
4a: Government offices/repositories
The U.S. Census
“The Census Day” by Dollarhide
http://www.historicalpreservationgroup.org/hgs_census_day.htm
“Census Mista...
Military
View:
Webinar “Introduction to Military Records at the
National Archives” by John Deeben
http://www.ustream.tv/re...
Land
Explore:
Bureau of Land Management
http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/default.aspx
The States
Go to the wiki at familysearch.org and search
under a name of your state. Look for the state
archive/library th...
Counties
Non-government
Lesson:
Valuable sources are housed everywhere from
the major genealogy collections, to the most
modest public library.
“9 Genealogy Libraries to Visit Before You Die”
http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/9-
libraries/
U.S. Genweb—go to ...
FHL/FamilySearch.org
Lesson:
The LDS Church sponsors the largest genealogical
organization in the world, which has amassed a
huge amount of inf...
Read the article “FamilySearch” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FamilySearch
Search the FHL catalog for resources in your are...
Online
Lesson:
Not all genealogical information is online, but
some is, and it may be good or bad. The most
commonly used types o...
How to Google Your Family Tree by Daniel Lynch
Searchforancestors.com
Cyndi’s List and Linkpendium
“101 Best Websites for Genealogy in 2013”
http://familytreemagazine.com/article/101-best-
web...
Home Sources
Best of the Photodetective:
http://www.familytreemagazine.com/upload/im
ages/pdf/best-of-the-photo-detective.pdf
Cost:
10 hours
Find Your Inner Anal Retentive…
Module 5:
How Information is Properly Recorded
Lesson:
Researchers need to record information
precisely using standard formats such as the
family group sheet and the ped...
View
Watch “Manage Your Genealogy Papers”
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSRL--
on6gs (6 minutes)
Activities
Family Group Sheet, Pedigree Chart, Source
Checklist, Research Logs—google these terms in
order to see various ...
Read this short explanation of the proper way to
fill out genealogical forms: About.com:
“Charting Your Course” Lesson 1c
...
GenSoftReviews 2013—examine this list, and
then go to the websites of two of the software
programs in order to see what fe...
Homework
Fill out a FGS for the nuclear family they were
born into and source it as best you can.
Interactive Online Trees...
Cost:
3 hours
Sorting it all out…
Module 6:
Analyzing and Interpreting Information
Lesson:
Information pulled from sources can be
erroneous, conflicting, or unclear, and the
researcher must evaluate it.
Read, “Fundamentals of Evidence Analysis,”
pp. 15-38 of Evidence Explained.
Genealogy Research Map
A case study:
Read “Challenge: Cordelia’s Birth Date and
Birthplace,” pp. 212-214 of Unpuzzling Your Past.
Resources:
Script Tutorial: Making Sense of Old
Handwriting
https://script.byu.edu/Pages/home.aspx
United States Record Se...
Cost:
2 hours
Painting in the Background…
Module 7
Background Research
Lesson:
Genealogy without historical context is boring,
and the background information often helps
explain why our ancesto...
Explain that background information is found
in many of the same places we search for
published genealogies—World Cat, GB,...
Highlight:
Infotrac, America History and Life
American Memory website.
Online State Encyclopedias and timelines
Cost:
1 hour
Wearing many hats…
Module 8:
How to Provide Service
Lesson:
Staff will be called on to fulfill a number of
different roles when providing genealogy
reference, including negot...
Read “The Genealogy Reference Interview,”
PNLA Quarterly, v. 68, Spring 2004, pp. 13-15.
http://www.pnla.org/recent-quarte...
Cost:
4 hours
Recapitulation:
What are genealogy & family history?
What they already know
Searching vs. research
Where to research
How t...
Total cost:
24 hours
But wait, there’s more…
Module 9:
Custom Tailored
Your collection
Your service policy
Other resources in your community
Flexibility in the order of the modules
Flexibility in swapping out sources & activities
Flexibility in updating as needed
Continuing ed…
Dick Eastman’s blog
GENEALIB
“Digital Library of the Week” in American Libraries
www.ilovelibraries.or/arti...
Learn by teaching
Geneatech—software, apps, scanners, etc.
Old House Research
Adoption Research
Various Types of Ethnic Re...
Why this method will work
Manageable chunks
Explaining why each chunk is important
Concise, up to date, and entertaining
i...
Final thought
Go Illini!
Fast and affordable methods for training genealogy staff
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Fast and affordable methods for training genealogy staff

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This talk provides details of how to train library staff to provide reference service to genealogists and family historians.

Fast and affordable methods for training genealogy staff

  1. 1. Making the Financial Case for Genealogical Librarianship Fast and Affordable Methods for Training Genealogy Staff Presented by Nicole Wedemeyer Miller, University of Illinois GSLIS nwmiller@illinois.edu
  2. 2. A series of interconnecting talks…
  3. 3. Assumptions That some training is necessary & desirable That your new staff knows nothing about family history That this training will cover research sources & methods, and patron service That the combination of in-house & independent study is the cheapest way to go That this does not cover everything, but will enable them to answer many questions
  4. 4. Break it down.
  5. 5. It’s modular!
  6. 6. Do, re, mi…
  7. 7. Module 1 What are genealogy and family history?
  8. 8. Lesson: A quick overview of genealogy and family history will define these terms and provide the big picture.
  9. 9. Homework: Crash Course in Genealogy “…a guided tour by flying over genealogy research at 20,000 feet.”
  10. 10. OR Family History 101
  11. 11. PLUS “What’s in a Name?” Chapter 4 of Unpuzzling Your Past
  12. 12. They can consult:
  13. 13. Cost? Free
  14. 14. The Confidence Booster…
  15. 15. Module 2 What They Already Know
  16. 16. Lesson: Many sources used in genealogy reference are sources already used in regular reference service.
  17. 17. Activity: reference tour --phone, crisscross and city directories --BGMI and the biographical sources it indexes --back issues of newspapers, either microfilmed or print plus any indices --general and specialized encyclopedias --perpetual calendar --history articles and books, especially WPA guides, American Heritage Magazine --travel books (lots of local history information hides out here) --maps
  18. 18. Cost? One hour x 2 = 2 hours
  19. 19. The Fork in the Road…
  20. 20. Module 3: Searching vs. Researching
  21. 21. Lesson: There is a big difference between searching for previously compiled and published information, and researching sources in order to compile your own. Any information found through searching needs to be evaluated, not just taken at face value.
  22. 22. Where to search? Look for published genealogies on World Cat, Familysearch.org, GB, Internet Archive, and at the Library of Congress. Search for articles on a family/geographical area in genealogical and local history periodicals using PERSI, GPAI and Index to Genealogical Periodicals.
  23. 23. More searching activities The WorldConnect Project at Rootsweb.ancestry.com and werelate.org. Message boards at Rootsweb and genealogy.com. Examine Genealogies in the Library of Congress.
  24. 24. Cost? 2 hours
  25. 25. The Whac-A-Mole™ Game…
  26. 26. Module 4: Where to Search
  27. 27. Overarching lesson: Sources are located in a variety of often- changing locations, and many of the needed sources will be located outside of your library/archive.
  28. 28. 4a: Government offices/repositories
  29. 29. The U.S. Census “The Census Day” by Dollarhide http://www.historicalpreservationgroup.org/hgs_census_day.htm “Census Mistakes” by Dollarhide http://genealo.gy/?cat=1&paged=470 Ancestry’s 10 Census Tips-- c.mfcreative.com/email/us/guides/10_census_tips_v3.pdf Have them track one ancestor through three U.S. censuses.
  30. 30. Military View: Webinar “Introduction to Military Records at the National Archives” by John Deeben http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/38187091
  31. 31. Land Explore: Bureau of Land Management http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/default.aspx
  32. 32. The States Go to the wiki at familysearch.org and search under a name of your state. Look for the state archive/library that is listed. Explore its website. Or, go to http://statearchives.us/index.htm.
  33. 33. Counties
  34. 34. Non-government
  35. 35. Lesson: Valuable sources are housed everywhere from the major genealogy collections, to the most modest public library.
  36. 36. “9 Genealogy Libraries to Visit Before You Die” http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/9- libraries/ U.S. Genweb—go to the page for your county and see what research places are listed.
  37. 37. FHL/FamilySearch.org
  38. 38. Lesson: The LDS Church sponsors the largest genealogical organization in the world, which has amassed a huge amount of information in Salt Lake City. Much of it is on tens of thousands of rolls of microfilm, which are stored in a granite mountain, but can be accessed through ILL at a network of Family History Centers and participating libraries. This information is beginning to be digitized, and can be found on their website.
  39. 39. Read the article “FamilySearch” http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FamilySearch Search the FHL catalog for resources in your area. See if any of the digitized record groups cover your area. View: Record Search Tips on FamilySearch (4 minutes) https://familysearch.org/learningcenter/lesson/record-search-tips-on- familysearch/557 AND Access to Records at Familysearch.org (3 minutes) https://familysearch.org/learningcenter/lesson/access-to-records-on- familysearch/551
  40. 40. Online
  41. 41. Lesson: Not all genealogical information is online, but some is, and it may be good or bad. The most commonly used types of websites include: government, library/archives, collections of digitized materials, genealogy/local history groups, volunteer genealogy projects, and subscription based.
  42. 42. How to Google Your Family Tree by Daniel Lynch
  43. 43. Searchforancestors.com
  44. 44. Cyndi’s List and Linkpendium “101 Best Websites for Genealogy in 2013” http://familytreemagazine.com/article/101-best- websites-2013
  45. 45. Home Sources
  46. 46. Best of the Photodetective: http://www.familytreemagazine.com/upload/im ages/pdf/best-of-the-photo-detective.pdf
  47. 47. Cost: 10 hours
  48. 48. Find Your Inner Anal Retentive…
  49. 49. Module 5: How Information is Properly Recorded
  50. 50. Lesson: Researchers need to record information precisely using standard formats such as the family group sheet and the pedigree chart, available in print and computerized versions, and they need to keep their stuff organized.
  51. 51. View Watch “Manage Your Genealogy Papers” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pSRL-- on6gs (6 minutes)
  52. 52. Activities Family Group Sheet, Pedigree Chart, Source Checklist, Research Logs—google these terms in order to see various samples of all of these forms.
  53. 53. Read this short explanation of the proper way to fill out genealogical forms: About.com: “Charting Your Course” Lesson 1c http://genealogy.about.com/library/lessons/blint ro1c.html.
  54. 54. GenSoftReviews 2013—examine this list, and then go to the websites of two of the software programs in order to see what features they have. Most allow you free trials.
  55. 55. Homework Fill out a FGS for the nuclear family they were born into and source it as best you can. Interactive Online Trees—go to Family Tree at familysearch.org and play with it.
  56. 56. Cost: 3 hours
  57. 57. Sorting it all out…
  58. 58. Module 6: Analyzing and Interpreting Information
  59. 59. Lesson: Information pulled from sources can be erroneous, conflicting, or unclear, and the researcher must evaluate it.
  60. 60. Read, “Fundamentals of Evidence Analysis,” pp. 15-38 of Evidence Explained.
  61. 61. Genealogy Research Map
  62. 62. A case study: Read “Challenge: Cordelia’s Birth Date and Birthplace,” pp. 212-214 of Unpuzzling Your Past.
  63. 63. Resources: Script Tutorial: Making Sense of Old Handwriting https://script.byu.edu/Pages/home.aspx United States Record Selection Table https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/United_Sta tes_Record_Selection_Table
  64. 64. Cost: 2 hours
  65. 65. Painting in the Background…
  66. 66. Module 7 Background Research
  67. 67. Lesson: Genealogy without historical context is boring, and the background information often helps explain why our ancestors lived as they did.
  68. 68. Explain that background information is found in many of the same places we search for published genealogies—World Cat, GB, PERSI, etc. http://genealogybooklinks.com
  69. 69. Highlight: Infotrac, America History and Life American Memory website. Online State Encyclopedias and timelines
  70. 70. Cost: 1 hour
  71. 71. Wearing many hats…
  72. 72. Module 8: How to Provide Service
  73. 73. Lesson: Staff will be called on to fulfill a number of different roles when providing genealogy reference, including negotiator, therapist, and research coach. Also, the genealogy reference interview is typically longer and more complicated than the regular reference interview.
  74. 74. Read “The Genealogy Reference Interview,” PNLA Quarterly, v. 68, Spring 2004, pp. 13-15. http://www.pnla.org/recent-quarterly Observe—either at your institution or another.
  75. 75. Cost: 4 hours
  76. 76. Recapitulation: What are genealogy & family history? What they already know Searching vs. research Where to research How to record information properly Analyzing & interpreting Background research How to provide service
  77. 77. Total cost: 24 hours
  78. 78. But wait, there’s more…
  79. 79. Module 9: Custom Tailored
  80. 80. Your collection Your service policy Other resources in your community
  81. 81. Flexibility in the order of the modules Flexibility in swapping out sources & activities Flexibility in updating as needed
  82. 82. Continuing ed… Dick Eastman’s blog GENEALIB “Digital Library of the Week” in American Libraries www.ilovelibraries.or/articles/digitallibrary Printed Sources Webinars—Rootstech, FamilySearch.org, Legacy, Wisconsin Historical Society, NGS Adventures in Genealogy Education-- http://genealogyeducation.blogspot.com
  83. 83. Learn by teaching Geneatech—software, apps, scanners, etc. Old House Research Adoption Research Various Types of Ethnic Research Genetics and genealogy Social Media and genealogy
  84. 84. Why this method will work Manageable chunks Explaining why each chunk is important Concise, up to date, and entertaining information A variety of formats
  85. 85. Final thought Go Illini!

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