Wingate Ubd Research Unit
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Wingate Ubd Research Unit

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This is an in depth lesson plan, following the Understanding by Design model, for a research unit taught to 9th grade students.

This is an in depth lesson plan, following the Understanding by Design model, for a research unit taught to 9th grade students.

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    Wingate Ubd Research Unit Wingate Ubd Research Unit Document Transcript

    • Wingate 1 Assignment #4 Stage 3 - Understanding by Design Mary “Nicole” Wingate
    • Wingate 2 Title of Unit Research Paper Unit Grade Level 9th Grade Literature Essential Questions Overarching Questions: Topical Questions: How can I support my ideas and views about a How can I avoid plagiarism in my research paper? topic with various sources without How can I tell if a source is reliable? plagiarizing? Why should I only use reliable sources in my research paper? Why is it important that I am able to recognize What is the difference between fact and opinion and why is reliable and unreliable resources on a daily that important? basis? How can I find information relevant to my research paper topic? How can I find good answers to my questions? How can I develop and write a research paper? How do we synthesize multiple sources and viewpoints in How can I best convey my ideas and thoughts research? about a topic? How can I organize my paper in a logical manner? As you begin your research, where would you begin to look for reliable articles and why? Where would you avoid looking for sources because they are more likely to be unreliable and why? Understandings: Students will understand that: - research papers use personal experiences, anecdotes, and/or examples to emphasize points and relate those points to the reader. - the research process can be applied to any topic to write an effective paper. - research papers synthesize ideas and perspectives from print, media, and other various sources. - the best argument acknowledges opposing perspectives so that they can be discredited and the students can explain why their view is best. - assessing their own papers using the research paper rubric is necessary when writing a research paper. - evaluating sources to determine if they are reliable or unreliable involves looking at the author of the source, the date the source was updated, the purpose of the source, and whether the source uses facts or opinions. - evaluating sources for reliability is necessary and crucial in the research paper process. - a good research paper has an effective thesis statement that guides the reader through the paper. - differences in information needs lead to different means and sources for acquiring information. - effective arguments are organized and well-presented, which can be achieved by working through the writing process.
    • Wingate 3 Stage 3 Before beginning this unit, students will take the pretest on pages 14-15 of this packet. This pretest will test for all prerequisite skills on this topic. W Where are your students headed and Why? What is required of them? Where are the students headed and why? The teacher will introduce the unit by giving students a content map. This content map will act as their “map” of the unit. It will provide a way for students to remember where they are, and see where they are going, in an organized fashion. Students will begin by filling in the four unit essential questions (overarching EQs) on their content map. The teacher will explain that these will be the “big questions” students will be able to answer at the end of the unit. - How can I support my ideas and views about a topic with various sources without plagiarizing? - Why is it important that I am able to recognize reliable and unreliable resources on a daily basis? - How can I find good answers to my questions? - Ho w can I best convey my ideas and thoughts about a topic? What is required of them? Students will then fill in the four major concepts of the unit, which will begin a discussion of what is required of them throughout the unit. The four major concepts are: Plagiarism, Synthesizing Information, Works Cited, and MLA Format. The teacher will explain to the students that they will learn information about each of these concepts that helps them to answer their unit essential questions. She will then provide them with detailed handouts concerning exactly what is expected of them in the unit. Overall descriptions and due dates will be provided for the following items: - Note Cards - Sentence Outlines - Completed Interviews - Rough Drafts - Final Drafts Students will be given their Research Paper Guidelines in handout format (page 16 of packet), a Parent Letter to inform parents of the unit (page 17 of packet), a handout the details the Steps the students will take in the process (page 18 of packet), and a Rubric for their Research Paper(page 19-20). Students will be aware of all that is expected of them from the beginning.
    • Wingate 4 How will the students be hooked and held in this unit? H There will be several assignments throughout the unit that “hook” students’ attention. Throughout the unit students will be actively engaged in the research paper process, finding information about how they can have the lifestyle they want, interviewing people about that lifestyle, and then writing a paper about them achieving the lifestyle themselves. The following are “HOOK” activities that will be used in the unit (based on several entry points): At the beginning of the unit… Foundational Entry Point They may begin by doing a freewrite to answer the question: “What do you want to be when you ‘grow up,’ and how will you get there?” After students write for seven minutes on this topic, filling up an index card, they will share their responses with their ones and twos partners. A few student volunteers will then be allowed to share their responses with their classmates. The teacher will then explain to students that they are going to begin the research paper process. During this process they will learn how to write a research paper, and they will write about how they can achieve their own “dream future.” Logical Entry Point Students may examine the online chart entitled “Median Annual Income.” This chart correlates the years of education with the amount of money made per year. Students will then make an assumption about education and income based on the chart, and then explain their assumption on an index card. Narrational Entry Point Look at the guy in Picture A and the guy in Picture B. How do you think each one of them made it to where they are in the picture? Tell me their story. Write for seven minutes, or until you fill up your index card. Make sure you address both men in the pictures. (The pictures in this prompt are on page 21 of this packet). Starting the research section of the unit… The teacher will begin by asking students to write a journal entry about a time that someone spread a rumor about them that was not true. They will write about how they felt because of the rumor, what happened to them and others as a result of the rumor, and if the truth ever came out. The teacher will then let students share their journals with a partner. This is a situation that every ninth grade student can relate too, and it’s something they’re interested in. Therefore, the teacher has hooked their attention. The teacher will then explain that untrue statements and ideas can be found in various resources, also (the internet, magazines, etc.). We’ll relate how important it is to know the information in those resources is true to how important it was for them that their friends knew the truth when they were being gossiped about. What activities, instruction, and guidance will be provided to enable E and equip students to explore and experience the important ideas in this unit?
    • Wingate 5 Throughout this section, the essential questions or understandings addressed in each activity are included in red. 1. Students will complete the “HOOK” activity for the beginning of the unit, writing about their “dream future.” 2. Students will become familiar with their topic. They will read an introductory article on education and lifestyle. When they begin researching, they will research the four following levels of education and the lifestyles for each: high school dropout, high school graduate, person with an associate’s degree, person with a bachelor’s degree. They will put an emphasis on the level of education that they will have to acquire to achieve their “dream” future that they wrote about in the “HOOK” activity. 3. Students will complete the “HOOK” activity for the research section of the unit. They will discuss the importance of finding and relaying only accurate information. Why should I only use reliable sources in my research paper? 4. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) With the teacher, the students will make a brainstormed list of the various ways they think resources can be evaluated. In this step the teacher will simply record their responses and initial ideas. A class list of “Ways to Evaluate Resources” will be comprised and displayed in the front of the media center. 5. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) Using an LCD projector, the teacher will pull up the QUICK website to go over the basic ways of evaluating resources-particularly web resources. The URL to this site is: http://www.quick.org.uk/menu.htm The teacher will quickly go over the eight main points on the homepage, and then allow students to work in pairs to explore the site. They will be asked to make an outline of the eight main points as they explore the site. The teacher will go through the first point with them, creating the outline as a model. The students will then work with partners to finish the outline. (“Extra Help” Version – Students who need extra help will be given outlines created by the teacher. They will “fill in the blanks” as they work through the website concerning reliable sources.) How can I tell if a source is reliable? What is the difference between fact and opinion and why is that important? Students will understand that evaluating sources for reliability is necessary and crucial in the research paper process. 6. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) After completing their outlines, students will take the quiz on the website, seeing if they are now “Qualified Internet Explorers.” (“Extra Help” Version – Students who need extra help will have the quiz questions on the website read aloud to them, using the text to speech software on the media center computers.) 7. The teacher will answer any questions about analyzing resources to see if they are reliable or unreliable. She will then pass out a handout that summarizes the ways of analyzing sources into five criteria: Accuracy, Objectivity, Authority, Verifiability, and Relevancy. (Handouts can be found on page 22 of this packet). As a class, students will analyze one article according to these criteria to see if it is reliable or unreliable. Students will then break up into pairs and analyze a second article. After analyzing this article, the class will determine as a whole whether it is reliable or unreliable and why. Students will then analyze a third article individually to determine whether it is reliable or unreliable. All three of the articles analyzed will be chosen by the teacher and given to students. (“Extra Help” Version – Students who need extra help on the individual portion of this activity will receive articles that have parts highlighted to draw attention to certain criteria for identifying reliable and unreliable sources.) Students will understand that evaluating sources to determine if they are reliable or unreliable involves looking at the author of the source, the date the source was updated, the purpose of the source, and whether the source uses facts or opinions. 8. Students will take two minutes to write a summary of what they have learned about reliable and unreliable sources. They will share what they wrote with their partner, and then the entire class. The
    • Wingate 6 class will make a comprehensive list of what they learned and discuss how these skills are important in their everyday lives. Why is it important that I am able to recognize reliable and unreliable resources on a daily basis? 9. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) The teacher will reiterate how important it is that resources are labeled as either reliable or unreliable, and that only reliable sources are used in their research papers. She’ll then explain that before you can analyze a source, though, you have to find it. And that’s what they’ll focus on today. She’ll ask the students where some places are that they can look for information on their research paper topic-“The Correlation of Education and Lifestyle.” 10. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) The media specialist will quickly go over the different sections of the media center (fiction, nonfiction, reference, periodicals, etc.), and demonstrate how to use the card catalog using the LCD projector. Students will then use the card catalog with a partner to find books on Education. (This will all be a review for students, as they have visited the media center several times before and gone through an orientation of the area there.) How can I find information relevant to my research paper topic? 11. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) The teacher will ask where else they can find relevant, current information on their topic, and they will undoubtedly answer “the Internet.” The media specialist will then introduce them to Galileo, using the LCD projector. After she has introduced them to the basic features of Galileo, they will complete a scavenger hunt with a partner. This scavenger hunt will familiarize them with Galileo and give them practice navigating through it. (This handout can be found on pages 23-24 of this packet.) The teacher will circulate as students work to answer any questions they may have. (“Extra Help” Version – Students needing extra help on this activity will have a modified version of the handout. This modified version is included on pages 25-26 of this packet.) How can I find information relevant to my research paper topic? How can I find good answers to my questions? Students will understand that differences in information needs lead to different means and sources for acquiring information. 12. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) The teacher will explain to the students that they will now begin doing research for their papers. However, there is one final thing they need to do before they begin to research. She calls their attention to number five on their reliable source handout- Relevancy. The handout asks students what they want to know about the topic they are researching, so she explains to students that they need to think about exactly what they are looking for in their research. She gives them fifteen index cards and asks them to write a research question on the top of ten of them. (The five other cards are used as “extras” for additional information). They write two research questions together as a class: 1 – What is the lifestyle of a high school dropout like? 2 – What is the lifestyle of a person with a bachelor’s degree like? (“Extra Help” Version – Students who need extra help on this activity will only be asked to create ten to twelve total note cards, based on individual needs and criteria.) 13. (Students will be in the media center for this activity.) Students are given three days in the media center to find print and electronic materials that they feel will best answer their research questions. They are to print out any online articles and copy any print articles. They are to read through the articles to look for answers to their research questions, or additional important information, but they are instructed not to write on their index cards yet. Students are asked to record the title of the resource they gain their information from, also. The following pathfinder is provided to assist the students in their research: Pathfinder URL: http://wingateeducationcorrelation.pbwiki.com/FrontPage (“Extra Help” Version – Students needing extra help in this section will be provided with two articles that supply an abundance of information on the topic. These two articles provided will be: “Think
    • Wingate 7 College? Me? Now?” and “Median Annual Income.”) As you begin your research, where would you begin to look for reliable articles and why? Where would you avoid looking for sources because they are more likely to be unreliable and why? How can I find good answers to my questions? Students will understand that research papers synthesize ideas and perspectives from print, media, and other various sources. 14. The next day, students return to the classroom. They are asked to clear their desk. They are given an example article and an example note card. Only this note card has the following research question at the top: “What are the benefits of a ninth grade academy?” Students are asked to read the sample article and find answers to this question, highlighting parts of the article as they read. 15. The teacher asks students if they can use any information from the article they want to, and listens to their responses. She then introduces the term PLAGIARISM and has students add this concept to their content maps. As a class, the students define plagiarism and learn how to use parenthetical documentation and quotation marks to avoid plagiarizing. As a class, students create a note card for the sample topic and article that is free of plagiarism. The teacher completes the process with them, creating her note card on the overhead projector. (A sample of the overhead used for student modeling is on page 27 of this packet). How can I avoid plagiarism in my research paper? How can I support my ideas and views about a topic with various sources without plagiarizing? 16. Students use the remainder of the class period and the next day to complete fifteen note cards, which are free of plagiarism, using the articles and resources they found in the media center. How can I develop and write a research paper? 17. After students complete their note cards, the teacher tells them there is still one thing missing. She tells them that the parenthetical documentation on their note cards is to point them to a Works Cited Page, and the students add “Works Cited” as the next concept on their content map. 18. Students are given a handout that explains how to create a Works Cited Page using MLA format. (This handout can be found on page 28 of this packet). They complete several examples together as a class, several with a partner, and several individually. They then take a “quiz” where they are given five articles and asked to create a Works Cited Page for these articles. (“Extra Help” Version – Students needing extra help with this activity will receive articles that have all major parts labeled that are needed to make a Works Cited entry-such as the author, publisher, date of publication, etc.) 19. After learning how to do Works Cited Pages, students include the Works Cited entry for each resource used on the back of their note cards. 20. After completing their note cards, students will submit them for grading. The teacher will then grade the note cards, making suggestions, and give them back to the students. They will then have an additional class day to modify or redo any note cards that they think should be changed. (Rubric for note cards can be found on page 29 of this packet. This rubric will be given to students when the note cards are assigned). 21. Students will be responsible for completing an interview outside of class during the research stage of the research paper process. They will interview someone who is in the position they hope to one day be in. (A guided interview sheet can be found on page 30 of this packet). They will include information from this interview on note cards and in their research papers. Students will understand that research papers use personal experiences, anecdotes, and/or examples to emphasize points and relate those points to the reader. 22. Students will begin planning their research papers by completing a Sentence Outline. This outline is a detailed outline that prompts students to write their introduction and conclusion papers as a part of the outline. (Gifted Students will write a paper with five body paragraphs, the majority of students
    • Wingate 8 will write a paper with four body paragraphs, and students who need “extra help” or have language barriers will write a paper with three body paragraphs.) (The sentence outlines can be found on pages 31-36 of this packet). How can I best convey my ideas and thoughts about a topic? How can I develop and write a research paper? How do we synthesize multiple sources and viewpoints in research? How can I organize my paper in a logical manner? Students will understand that a good research paper has an effective thesis statement that guides the reader through the paper. 23. Students will share their completed sentence outlines with their partners. They will offer constructive criticism and evaluate each other’s work. Students will then revise their own outlines before beginning to write their papers. Students will understand that the best argument acknowledges opposing perspectives so that they can be discredited and the students can explain why their view is best. 24. Students will write the rough draft of their research papers. They will write these papers using MLA format. They will be provided with a handout that explains MLA format and gives directions for incorporating it in their own papers. (Gifted Students will write a paper with five body paragraphs, the majority of students will write a paper with four body paragraphs, and students who need “extra help” or have language barriers will write a paper with three body paragraphs.) (The MLA Format handout can be found on page 37 of this packet). 25. The day that rough drafts are due, students will bring two copies of their papers to class. One copy they will turn in, the second copy they will grade themselves. The teacher will provide students with extra copies of the rubric. During class that day, they will grade their own paper and three classmates’ papers, giving constructive criticism and feedback. (“Extra Help” Version – Students needing extra help or extra time on this assignment will be asked to grade two classmates’ papers.) Students will understand that assessing their own papers using the research paper rubric is necessary when writing a research paper. 26. After grading their own papers, receiving feedback from their peers, and receiving feedback from the teacher, students will revise their paper and create their final drafts. How can I develop and write a research paper? Students will understand that effective arguments are organized and well-presented, which can be achieved by working through the writing process. 27. After completing the research paper process, students will reflect on their experience and what they learned. They will answer the following questions: What grade do I think I deserve on the research paper and why? What was the hardest part of the research paper process to me? What will I do differently the next time I write a research paper? What is the most beneficial thing I learned from this research unit? Why is it important that I know how to write a research paper? Students will understand that the research process can be applied to any topic to write an effective paper. *Students who are considered “Gifted” or needing “Extra Help” will be determined by personal records, scores on the pre-test, and classroom performance. Students who fall within each of these categories may change from assignment to assignment, based on individual strengths. What activities, products and performances will be designed to provide R students with the opportunity to reflect, rethink, and revise?
    • Wingate 9 Several activities in this unit allow students to reflect, rethink, and revise. These activities are: Students can Reflect: - Hook Activity for Beginning the Unit: Students answer the question: “What do you want to be when you ‘grow up,’ and how will you get there?” - Hook Activity for the Research Section of the Unit: Students write a journal about a time someone spread a rumor about them that was untrue. Students explore how damaging the rumor was, and relate it to untrue information in resources. - Students make a brainstormed list of the ways they think resources should be evaluated. - Students reflect on the information they have learned by taking two minutes to write a summary of what they learned about reliable and unreliable resources and how it affects them on a daily basis. - Students will come up with a brainstormed list of different places you could look for reliable sources on their research paper topic. - Students reflect on their research paper by grading it themselves the day rough drafts are due. - Students are able to reflect on the entire research paper process at the end of the unit by answering questions about what they learned and found to be beneficial. Students can Rethink/Revise: - Students are given the opportunity to rethink/revise their note cards after they are graded by the teacher. - Students rethink/revise their sentence outlines after receiving constructive criticism from a peer. - Students rethink/revise their rough drafts to create final drafts after reflecting on their own work and receiving feedback from their peers and the teacher. What self-assessments and self-evaluations will students participate in E to allow for reflection and transfer of learning? Throughout the unit, students will self-asses and self-evaluate by: - Evaluating their own research papers using the research paper rubric. - Completing the Self-Reflection questionnaire at the end of the unit. - At various times in the unit students will complete a short “freewrite” or “ticket-out-the-door” to reflect on what they learned in the previous lesson. - Students will interact in several class discussions that are reflections of prior learning. T How will instruction and activities be tailored to provide for the various learning needs, styles, knowledge and interests of students? The overall assignment is tailored to the specific interests and goals of the individual students as they are closely examining a lifestyle that is desirable to them. They are also interviewing a person in the community that they admire and hope to one day be like. Ways of Teaching to Different Learning Modalities: Visual: Students see the material by reading various articles, having various handouts to look at, having the teacher show aspects of websites on an LCD projector, having the teacher model an activity on the overhead projector. Interpersonal: Student uses their social strong points by working with partners on many assignments, sharing
    • Wingate 10 information with their ones and twos partner, and participating in class discussions. Kinesthetic: Students actively engaged through actively finding resources for their paper, actively writing their own papers, creating note cards for their papers, evaluating their own papers, using webquests and pathfinders for information. Verbal: Student hears the material through class discussions, the teacher incorporating “think alouds” into the lessons, students reading articles aloud in class, and verbal instructions. Intrapersonal: Students desire to work alone is met through individual practice on assignments after class practice, completing their own note cards and sentence outline, and writing their research paper individually. Logical: Students logic and organization is appealed to through the sentence outline, formulaic outline for note cards, and detailed rubric that is given to the students at the beginning of the unit. Modifications for Special Needs Students: Gifted Student: This student is required to complete an additional paragraph in his or her research paper, focusing on the lifestyle of a person with a master’s degree. This student will also be looked to at various times to initiate classroom discussion. The gifted student is paired with another higher-level student to facilitate meaningful discussion between them on partner assignments. Students with ADHD: Students with ADHD will have assignments broken down for them. For example, note cards will be completed in groups of five, rather that attempting all fifteen at once. Students will also be asked to report smaller portions back to the teacher as they complete assignments. Also, students will be partnered with focused and driven students during partner activities. Students with Learning Disabilities: These students will also have their work broken down into smaller, more manageable parts. Also, some of the assignments may be shortened. For example, only ten to twelve note cards are due, instead of fifteen. Students will also only write three of the four body paragraphs. Students with Limited English: These students will have an ESOL teacher accompanying them to class. She will provide assistance to them in translating information visually and verbally. Also, these students will have shortened assignments, as they have the extra task of translating all of their work. They will also have the assistance of Spanish/English dictionaries. How will learning experiences be organized/sequenced to O provide for greatest acquisition/understanding Students will work through the “Steps in the Term Paper Process” according the handout they are given at the beginning of the unit. These steps are: - Determine Your Topic (At this step students will analyze reliable resources) - Ask Yourself 10 Research Questions (At this step students will explore Galileo) - Research Your Topic (At this step students will explore Plagiarism, Works Cited Pages, and complete an Interview) - Decide on a Thesis - Create Three Sub-topics - Prepare an Outline - Write Your Rough Draft - Revise Your Rough Draft - Write Your Final Draft - Submit Your Final Draft with a Works Cited Page
    • Wingate 11 There are also several parts of this unit that are provided to students for the purpose of organization. They are: - The Content Map (Helps students organize the material in the unit as they progress through it) - Steps in the Term Paper Process Handout (Helps students work through the research paper process) - Sentence Outline (Helps students organize their research papers)
    • Wingate 12 Research Unit Pretest Name _________________________ Read the following paragraphs and decide whether the sources are reliable or not. After reading each paragraph, circle either reliable or unreliable, and explain your decision in at least four complete sentences. Paragraph 1 The Coca Cola Company is an American corporation that was founded in 1892, according to records from the US Food Administration. Today the company is engaged primarily in the manufacture and sale of syrup and concentrate for Coca-Cola, a sweetened, carbonated beverage that is a cultural institution in the United States and a symbol around the world of American tastes. The company also produces and sells other soft drinks and citrus beverages. Author: Joe Smith; US Food and Beverage Association Paragraph is: Reliable Unreliable Explanation: Put the following Works Cited entries in the appropriate order. Do so by numbering them on the line out in front of each entry. If the entry should come first, write a “1”. If it should be second, a “2,” etc. _____ Sturgeon, Theodore. "Science Fiction." The Encyclopedia Americana. International ed. 1995. _____ Eiselen, Malcolm R. "Franklin, Benjamin." The World Book Encyclopedia. 1994. _____ "France." Compton's Encyclopedia. 1992. In the following statement about cheerleading circle the ellipsis and put an “x” over the parenthetical documentation. Cheerleading is defined as, “ …a team sport in which the cheerleaders do a choreographed performance to music” (“Cheerleading” 1). Multiple Choice Choose the BEST answer for the following questions. The above quote about cheerleading is a(n) a. direct quote c. paraphrase b. paraphrased quote d. none of the above Ellipses are used to… a. show where words are added. c. show that the information is a direct quote. b. show where words were taken out. d. show that the information is a paraphrase. Italicizing a title on the computer is the same as doing what to it when you write it? a. underlining it c. putting quotation marks around it b. writing it in all CAPS d. none of the above A thesis statement is a. someone’s opinion on a topic c. the controlling idea of a research paper
    • Wingate 13 b. the first sentence of a research paper d. the concluding remark in a research paper True/False Write TRUE or FALSE out in front of the following statements: _____ A research paper topic should be broad. _____ Plagiarism is using somebody else’s words, even if you give them credit for it. _____ You put quotation marks around a statement that you write in your own words. _____ On a works cited page, the author’s last name comes first, followed by their first name. _____ Any source that can be accessed in the media center is reliable. _____ Galileo is an encyclopedia that can be found in the media center.
    • Wingate 14 Research Paper Guidelines Name ________________________ The research paper accounts for 20% of your final average and two test grades. Your grade is based on the product itself and your participation in the writing process. One of the predominant objectives of the research paper is to see you work through the steps of the writing process. Your greatest challenge is to remain on task and use your time wisely. • Due dates are firm, no matter if you are absent or present. A deadline is a deadline- no excuses will be accepted. • If I do not see you actively working on your paper on a daily basis, I will not accept one from you. • I will not accept a final draft from you unless you write the rough draft. Schedule February 7-16 – Create questions for research, work on answering questions, complete note cards, thesis statement, sub-topics February 9 – Letter signed by parent due February 16 – Note cards, thesis, and sub-topics due You must have 15 note cards written on index cards. Ten should be note cards that you answer your primary questions on, and five additional cards should supply additional important information. They must be completed according to the format provided. February 26-28 – Create sentence outline February 28 –Sentence Outline Due March 6 – Rough Draft Due The rough draft must be typed and completed to the best of your ability. It will be graded thoroughly for content and for grammar. March 15 – Final Draft Due All final drafts must be typed according to MLA format. Use size 12 point font, either Times New Roman, Courier, or Ariel. No other font should be used. Your papers should only be printed in black ink. No hand-written papers will be accepted. If you do not have a computer, you can use those in the media center or the public library. Do not ask me to print your paper!!! Assignment Due Date Worth Grade Percentage Note cards (15) February 16 45 pts. These four items Letter Signed by February 9 15 pts. will make up one Parent test grade. Sentence Outline February 28 20 pts. Daily Checks Random 20 pts. Rough Draft March 6 100 pts. One test grade Final Draft March 15 100 pts. 20% of semester grade
    • Wingate 15 TO: Parents of Ninth Grade Literature Students FROM: Nicole Wingate DATE: February 6, 2009 RE: Research Paper As part of the requirement for completing Ninth Grade Literature, your student has a research paper due on Thursday, March 15, 2009. Please understand that this due date is firm, regardless of attendance on that particular day. A zero on the paper will hurt his/her average tremendously causing him/her to be at high risk for failing the second semester of Ninth Grade Literature. The final draft of the paper itself counts as 20% of your child’s overall average for the semester. There are also two test grades and numerous quiz and daily grades that stem from this project. Beginning February 7th, we will spend approximately five weeks in class working on the papers. This should allow your student to complete most of the work for the paper in class. I will be collecting sections of the paper periodically to check progress. Your child has a schedule of due dates for these checks as well as a rubric by which the paper will be graded. Please help remind your student of these dates. I appreciate your support and positive reinforcement at home. I want to see everyone succeed in this endeavor. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact me at 427-1096, ext. 323 or by email at nwingate@wayne.k12.ga.us. Please sign this memo below and return it to me by February 9 (Friday). ***************************************************************************** I have read this memo and understand that my child has a research paper due on Thursday, March 15, 2009. I further understand that that the due date is firm, and if my student does not turn in a paper, he/she is at high risk to fail the second semester of Ninth Grade Literature. Student’s Name: ____________________________________________________________________ Parent or Guardian Signature: ____________________________________________________________________ Date: ________________________
    • Wingate 16 Steps in Term Paper Process 1. Determine your topic. Topic:______________________________________ 2. Ask yourself 10 questions about that topic. Record each of these questions on a separate note card. 3. Research your topic to find the answer to your questions. As you find the answer to your questions, add them to your note cards. Make sure to write the answers to your questions in complete sentences. Also, make sure to include the bibliographic information on the back of each note card. 4. Decide on a thesis: what the main point of your paper will be. The thesis statement is the CONTROLLING sentence for the entire paper. It should be something that can be proved. You will prove this statement in your body paragraphs. 5. Create at least three different categories (sub-topics) that you can break your questions in to. These sub-topics will create your body paragraphs. 6. Prepare an outline. 7. Write the rough draft using your outline and note cards as a guide. 8. Revise your rough draft based on comments and suggestions from your peers and the teacher. 9. Write a final draft, following suggestions that I have given you on the rough draft. 10. Submit the final draft with the Works Cited page Research Paper Requirements 1. Introduction 2. Body Paragraphs – each body paragraph will have at least two quotes from a secondary source 3. Conclusion 4. A Works Cited Page 5. All papers must be typed according to MLA specifications. THE LENGTH OF THE FINAL PAPER SHOULD BE BETWEEN 3 AND 5 PAGES, PLUS A WORKS CITED PAGE!!! The Works Cited page is the page following the body of the paper with the entries for each source quoted in the paper. These entries should be in ALPHABETICAL ORDER.
    • Wingate 17 Research Paper Rubric Unacceptable Acceptable Target Your Score (3 pts.) (6 pts.) (9 pts.) Appearance Knowledge of MLA Knowledge of MLA Knowledge of MLA format is not applied at format is partially format is appropriately all in paper OR three or applied in paper. applied in paper more of the following However, two of the (Margins, page MLA guidelines are not following do not meet numbers, spacing, and met: Margins, page MLA guidelines: header, are all (Facet of numbers, spacing, and Margins, page numbers, formatted using MLA Understanding- header. spacing, and header. guidelines) Application) Quote and Student uses less than Student only uses four At least two quotes or Paraphrase four quotes in paper. or five quotes or paraphrases are used at Only one perspective on paraphrases in paper. each level of Number topic is examined and Paper reflects educational attainment addressed. understanding of a few researched (high school perspectives from these graduate, associate’s sources, but these degree, and bachelor’s perspectives are not degree). At least six always portrayed quotes or paraphrases adequately in paper. total. Paper reflects (Facet of understanding of Understanding- multiple perspectives Perspective) from these sources and portrays them adequately in paper. Quote and Three or more quotes or Two quotes or All quotes and Paraphrase paraphrases used do not paraphrases used do not paraphrases used support student support student support student Synthesis and argument, convey argument, convey argument, convey Interpretation appropriate and appropriate and appropriate and insightful meaning from insightful meaning from insightful meaning from sources, incorporate sources, incorporate sources, incorporate lead-ins, and have lead-ins, and have lead-ins, and have appropriate appropriate appropriate parenthetical parenthetical parenthetical documentation documentation documentation (Facet of according to MLA according to MLA according to MLA Understanding- guidelines. guidelines. guidelines. Interpretation) Works Cited Only one reliable Only two reliable At least three reliable (Number of source is used in paper. sources are used in sources are used in Not all of the sources paper. paper and are included Sources) used in paper are on the works cited page. included on works cited page. Works Cited Knowledge of Works Knowledge of Works Knowledge of Works Format Cited criteria is applied Cited criteria is applied Cited criteria is applied with errors. Four or with few errors. Three perfectly. No errors in more errors on Works or less errors on Works format of Works Cited (Facet of Cited page according to Cited page according to page according to MLA Understanding- MLA format. MLA format. format. Works Cited Application) page is in ABC order. Grammar and Seven or more errors in Three to six errors in Two or less errors in Mechanics grammar or mechanics grammar or mechanics grammar or mechanics
    • Wingate 18 (counts twice) throughout paper. throughout paper. throughout paper. Paper has several errors Paper has few errors in Paper is basically in spelling, punctuation, spelling, punctuation, perfect in spelling, agreement, usage, agreement, usage, punctuation, agreement, sentence structure, and sentence structure, and usage, sentence comma usage. comma usage. structure, and comma usage. Organization Paper is choppy and Paper is overall well Paper is well organized, (counts twice) transitions are rarely or organized, and uses with clear introduction never used. Flow of some transitions to and conclusion. paper makes it hard to support flow of paper. Transitions are used understand and follow. effectively throughout paper. Ideas Explained Ideas are unclear and Ideas are well presented Ideas are well (counts twice) there is little to no and partially explained presented, explained, explanation or support and supported. and supported. of them. (Facet of Understanding- Explanation)
    • Wingate 19 A B Tell me the difference between the guy in picture A and picture B. How do you think each one of them made it to their particular situation?
    • Wingate 20 Finding Reliable Sources Reliable Not Reliable What to look for… 1. Accuracy – Look to see that the article/site is accurate and current. Is the information indisputable and complete? Does the source state facts or opinions? Does the publisher use editors and fact checkers? When was the article produced? When was it last updated? A: B: C: 2. Objectivity – Look to see that the article/site has minimum bias when interpreting or analyzing facts. What is the purpose of the site? Does it achieve its purpose? Who sponsors or publishes the information, where does the information come from? What can you tell about the author’s intentions? A: B: C: 3. Authority – Look to see if the author/publisher/editor is a reliable source. Can you determine the author’s/editor’s name? Is the author a recognized expert on the topic? What is the publisher’s reputation? A: B: C: 4. Verifiability – Look to confirm the information from the source with a second reliable source. Does the material cite the sources where it acquired its information? Where does the information come from? Does the author provide evidence where applicable and detail? Can you “check” the information? A: B: C: 5. Relevancy – Look to see if the article or site meets your needs. What do I want to know as a result from this article? Does the article answer my questions? A: B: C:
    • Wingate 21 Now that you know all about Galileo, it’s time to go on a scavenger hunt. Follow the directions below and record the appropriate answers. Here we go… 1. - Make sure “High School” is highlighted in red at the top of the screen. - In the Galileo Search Box type in 19th Century Women’s Literature and hit Search Selected Databases. How many articles came up under SIRS Knowledge Source? ______________ 2. - Click on View for the 3rd article under SIRS Knowledge Source. When was the article written? ______________ 3. - Return to the Galileo high school homepage. Click on Browse by Subject, click on Literature and then Literature and Literary Criticism. Type in Lord of the Flies, uncheck the full text option, and choose only one database – Literary Reference Center. Hit search. How many articles come up? ______________ - Check Full Text and hit search. How many are full text? ______________ What does “full text” mean? ____________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ - Check Peer Reviewed and hit search. How many articles are full text and peer reviewed?_______________ What does “peer reviewed” mean? _______________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ Who wrote the 2nd article? ____________________ What is the name of the 1st article? _______________________________________________ 4. - Go back to the high school homepage. Click on Browse by Subject. If you were doing a research paper on possible cures for cancer: What subject might you use? _____________________ What “topic words” might you type in to search for? 5. - Go back to the high school homepage and select Databases A-Z. Type in Student Research Center (EBSCO Host). Choose the second option. Type in education and income correlation. Hit search. How many articles come up? ______________ Click on Refine Search and select Full Text, then hit search again.
    • Wingate 22 How many articles come up? ______________ Find the article titled Upheaval in Education and Training. Read the abstract. What is this article about? Could this article be helpful for your research paper? 6. - Click on New Search. Now type Academy for 9th graders eases way to high-school. Hit Search. Find that article and answer these questions… When was this article written? ____________________ Who wrote the article? _____________________ Skim the article and tell me what it is about: What might you need this article to write a paper on? Is it a reliable source? Why or why not?
    • Wingate 23 Now that you know all about Galileo, it’s time to go on a scavenger hunt. Follow the directions below and record the appropriate answers. Here we go… 1. - Make sure “High School” is highlighted in red at the top of the screen. - In the Galileo Search Box type in 19th Century Women’s Literature and hit Search Selected Databases. How many articles came up under SIRS Knowledge Source? ______________ 2. - Click on View for the 3rd article under SIRS Knowledge Source. When was the article written? ______________ 3. - Return to the Galileo high school homepage. Click on Browse by Subject, click on Literature and then Literature and Literary Criticism. Type in Lord of the Flies, uncheck the full text option, and choose only one database – Literary Reference Center. Hit search. How many articles come up? ______________ - Check Full Text and hit search. How many are full text? ______________ What does “full text” mean? ____________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ - Check Peer Reviewed and hit search. How many articles are full text and peer reviewed?_______________ What does “peer reviewed” mean? _______________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ Who wrote the 2nd article? ____________________ What is the name of the 1st article? _______________________________________________ 4. - Go back to the high school homepage. Click on Browse by Subject. If you were doing a research paper on possible cures for cancer, which of the following subjects would you most likely search under? Circle the appropriate answer. Business & Economics Literature Health & Medicine What “topic words” might you type in to search for? Circle the appropriate answer. Cancer in Georgia Cures for Cancer Number of People with Cancer
    • Wingate 24 5. - Go back to the high school homepage and select Databases A-Z. Type in Student Research Center (EBSCO Host). Choose the second option. Type in education and income correlation. Hit search. How many articles come up? ______________ Click on Refine Search and select Full Text, then hit search again. How many articles come up? ______________ Find the article titled Upheaval in Education and Training (Look on page 3 of the search results). Read the abstract. What does the abstract say the article discusses the correlation between? Could this article be helpful for your research paper?
    • Wingate 25 Question??? __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Information: __________________________________________________________________ Paraphrase or __________________________________________________________________ Quotation Marks __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Code __________________________________________________________________ Page # of Quote __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 26 Books First or single author's name is written last name, first name. The basic form for a book citation is: Last name, First name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. If there is more than one author, the first author’s name is written last name first; subsequent author names are written first name, last name. Gillespie, Paula, and Neal Lerner. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring. Boston: Allyn, 2000. An Article in a Newspaper or Magazine Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical Day Month Year: pages. An Article in a Scholarly Journal Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume.Issue (Year): pages. An Entire Web Site Name of Site. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sometimes found in copyright statements). Date you accessed the site <electronic address>. A Page on a Web Site For an individual page on a Web site, list the author or alias if known, followed by the information covered above for entire Web sites. Make sure the URL points to the exact page you are referring to. An Article in a Web Magazine Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name . "Title of Article." Title of Online Publication. Date of Publication. Date of Access<electronic address>. A Personal Interview Listed by the name of the person you have interviewed. Purdue, Pete. Personal Interview. 1 Dec. 2000. A Short Story in an Anthology Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Title of Story.” Title of Book. Name of Editor. Edition/Volume. City of Publication: Publisher, Year. Page numbers. ****REMEMBER**** - The Works cited page should be in alphabetical order - Italics is the equivalent of underlining
    • Wingate 27 Unacceptable Acceptable Target Total Points (1 pt.) (2 pts.) (3 pts.) Note Card Format 10 or fewer note 11 to 14 note cards 15 or more note cards are completed are completed, with cards are completed (Facet of with several errors in less than three errors following Understanding- format. in format. appropriate format. Application) Number of Sources Two or fewer reliable Three reliable At least four reliable sources are sources are sources are represented in note represented in note represented in note (Facet of cards and there are cards and have less cards and follow Understanding- several errors in than three errors in appropriate Works Application, Perspective) Works Cited format. Works Cited format. Cited format. Note Cards Information on note Most information is All information is Answer Questions cards tends to be off on topic and answers appropriate for (counts twice) topic and does not research questions. research paper topic answer research and answers (Facet of questions. research questions. Understanding- Interpretation) Rubric Grading Scale Points Grade 11-12 95 8-10 85 6-7 75 >6 60
    • Wingate 28 Interview Questions ELA9LSV2 When delivering and responding to presentations, the student: 1b. Applies appropriate interviewing techniques (i.e., prepares and asks relevant questions; makes notes of responses; uses language that conveys maturity, sensitivity and respect; responds correctly and effectively to questions). Interviewer: _______________________________________________ Interviewee: _______________________________________________ Date of Interview: ___________________________________________ What did you plan to do in the future when you were in high school? How much education is required to do the job that you do? What is the highest level of education you have completed? In what ways has that education helped you achieve your current life style and economic status? In what ways has that education created obstacles for you to achieve your current life style and economic status? How would your life be different if you did not have the education that you have? How can I get where you are? Additional Questions: 1. 2.
    • Wingate 29 Sentence Outline for Education Correlation Paper: Name ______________________________ Write neatly on this sheet, or you may type, but you must follow this outline format. Four Body Paragraph Outline I. Opening Paragraph Begin with a catchy sentence about how Americans choose the level of education they acquire in their lifetime. Follow with two to three sentences about the different levels of education that are available and how to achieve each. Include a sentence about why most Americans choose the level that they decide to choose. Conclude with your thesis statement – the last sentence. ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Thesis Statement:__________________________________________________________________ II. Paragraph about high school dropouts A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ III. Paragraph about high school graduates A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 30 IV. Paragraph about a person with a two year college degree (associate’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ V. Paragraph about a person with a four year college degree (bachelor’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ VI. Conclusion A. A sentence that rewords the thesis statement ______________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. Three to four sentences stating the benefits of higher education (may include one general quote) _____________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. A sentence that offers a final comment on the paper _________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 31 Sentence Outline for Education Correlation Paper: Name ______________________________ Write neatly on this sheet, or you may type, but you must follow this outline format. Three Body Paragraph Outline I. Opening Paragraph Begin with a catchy sentence about how Americans choose the level of education they acquire in their lifetime. Follow with two to three sentences about the different levels of education that are available and how to achieve each. Include a sentence about why most Americans choose the level that they decide to choose. Conclude with your thesis statement – the last sentence. ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Thesis Statement:__________________________________________________________________ II. Paragraph about high school graduates A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ III. Paragraph about a person with a two year college degree (associate’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 32 ___________________________________________________________________________ IV. Paragraph about a person with a four year college degree (bachelor’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ V. Conclusion A. A sentence that rewords the thesis statement ______________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. Three to four sentences stating the benefits of higher education (may include one general quote) _____________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. A sentence that offers a final comment on the paper _________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 33 Sentence Outline for Education Correlation Paper: Name ______________________________ Write neatly on this sheet, or you may type, but you must follow this outline format. 5 Body Paragraph Outline I. Opening Paragraph Begin with a catchy sentence to grab your reader’s attention. Introduce the general idea of your research paper, and conclude this paragraph with your thesis statement. ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ Thesis Statement:__________________________________________________________________ II. Paragraph about high school dropouts A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ III. Paragraph about high school graduates A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ IV. Paragraph about a person with a two year college degree (associate’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 34 ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ V. Paragraph about a person with a four year college degree (bachelor’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ V. Paragraph about a person with a six year college degree (master’s degree) A. Topic Sentence_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used_______________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________ VI. Conclusion ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________
    • Wingate 35 MLA Format When typing your paper make sure to: • Double Space On your toolbar go to Format and then Paragraph. Find the section labeled Spacing, then Line Spacing. Click on the arrow and select double. • Set your margins to one inch On your toolbar go to File and then Page Setup. Under Margins, type in “1” for top, bottom, left and right. • Include your name and page number in the upper right hand corner of each page On your toolbar go to View and then Header and Footer. Click on the right align key, which looks like this: Type in your Last Name and click on the icon that is shown below to insert page numbers: Click on Close to close the header and footer toolbar. • In the upper left hand corner list: Your Name Mrs. Wingate 9th Grade Literature Date (Day Month Year) • Center the title, but do not underline it, italicize it, or put it in quotation marks The first page of your paper should look like the following: Smith 1 John Smith Mrs. Wingate 9th Grade Literature 6 March 2007 Why College is Cool Do a person’s educational choices affect his or her lifestyle? Most people agree that a high school dropout does not have the same opportunities as someone with a Website for Additional Help on MLA format: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/
    • Wingate 36 Resources WEBSITES FOR STUDENT USE Resource Pathfinder for Student Use http://wingateeducationcorrelation.pbwiki.com/FrontPage Galileo http://www.galileo.usg.edu/ Median Annual Income http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0883617.html MLA Guidelines http://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/557/01/ REFERENCE MATERIALS World Book Encyclopedia Reference Section of Media Center OTHER Images for “Hook” Activity http://pro.corbis.com/images/42-16074898.jpg?size=572&uid=%7BB2DF4658-96DE-4B08-8272- D2F44B0F45BF%7D http://photo.net/photo/pcd1341/bum-42.4.jpg Teacher Resource – Teaching Reliable Sources http://www.virtualchase.com/researchskills/quality3.html