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   Title of Unit Women’s Literature Research                             Grade Level
                 Paper U...
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attention will be “hooked” through this exercise because they will see that they can connect with the women of ...
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                                                                      Essential Questions


   Overarching Que...
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                 f. Maintains coherence by relating all topic sentences to the thesis or controlling idea, as a...
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ELA11C2 The student demonstrates understanding of manuscript form, realizing that different forms of writing re...
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    -   We have nothing in common with women of the 19th century
    -   All articles that you can find online ...
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provide them with detailed handouts concerning exactly what is expected of them in the unit. Overall descriptio...
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event are different…one is a primary source, and one is a secondary source.

The Plagiarism and Works Cited sec...
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    cited entry, following MLA format, for various types of resources. (This handout can be found on page 16 of...
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        following questions:
            What grade do I think I deserve on the research paper and why?
      ...
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        T             How will instruction and activities be tailored to provide for the various learning ne...
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Students with Learning Disabilities: These students will also have their work broken down into smaller, more m...
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         The research paper accounts for four test grades this semester. Your grade is based on the product i...
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Rubric for Draft of Research Paper                                                                 Name _____...
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How to Format a Note Card:

                                                      Designated as
    _________...
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Books
First or single author's name is written last name, first name. The basic form for a book citation is:
 ...
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Sentence Outline for Women’s Literature Research Paper: Name ______________________________
Write neatly on th...
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      ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
...
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      ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

...
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  ______________________________________________________________________________________________________

  __...
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MLA Format

When typing your paper make sure to:

    •   Double Space
                On your toolbar go to F...
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Wingate instructional partner collaboration lesson plan

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Wingate instructional partner collaboration lesson plan

  1. 1. Wingate 1 Title of Unit Women’s Literature Research Grade Level Paper Unit 11th Grade American Literature Learner Analysis Group of Learners: My target population is three classes of 11th grade students. Two of the classes are inclusion classes, and one is a remedial class. The two inclusion classes have a regular education teacher, who is assisted by a special education teacher. The first period inclusion class has twenty-two students, the second period remedial class has fourteen students, and the third period inclusion class has twenty-nine students in it. In the first period inclusion class, six students are labeled as special education students, and in the third period inclusion class, seven students are labeled as special education students. In the second period remedial class, there are five students who are taking the course for the second time. Of the thirteen students who are labeled as special education students in these classes, three have behavioral disorders, two have ADHD, and eight have learning disabilities that range from minor to moderate. Overall, the teacher expresses concern for the levels of her classes, saying they move extremely slowly. Her remedial class is her highest concern. Because of the low level of the majority of students in all three classes, graphic organizers, extra time, and remediation are expected and needed throughout the unit. Motivational Strategies Motivation is key in this unit and with these students. Encouraging these students to actively participate is a constant battle for this teacher. To motivate students in this unit, the ARCS model will be used. Attention: The classroom teacher will begin the unit by pulling off of students personal lives and situations. She will have them complete a freewrite answering the following questions: “Explain to me a time that you felt repressed like one of the women in our stories. How did you feel? What was your situation? Your circumstances? How did you “escape” the situation?” Students will be encouraged to write for seven minutes. A discussion will follow about repression and its effect on the repressed. Students
  2. 2. Wingate 2 attention will be “hooked” through this exercise because they will see that they can connect with the women of the stories, even if they are characters that were created over a hundred years ago. We’ll talk about how we can understand the pain of the women in the stories, and explore how they must have felt. Relevance: The unit will be relevant to students when they make a connection to the female characters who are repressed in the story. The research paper should be viewed as a way of highlighting and speaking out again such repression. Students will understand their connection with the research paper topic, and the unit will be relevant to them because of this connection. Confidence: Students will be given clear instructions and directions at the beginning of the unit. Therefore, students clearly understand what is expected of them from the very beginning. As a result, students can move forward, confidently working through the unit to establish the set goals. Several essential questions will be presented and explored, each being mastered before moving on to the next topic. Their mastery of topics such as plagiarism, MLA format, and Galileo will help the students be confident of their abilities. Also, several exercises will move from being whole- class activities, to partner activities, and eventually to individual activities. This scaffolding of the assignments will help the students move through the unit with confidence, making sure they feel prepared to complete the activity at hand before they are asked to do so individually. Satisfaction: Students will experience the satisfaction of watching their research papers come together “piece by piece.” At the end of the unit, students will turn in not only their final drafts, but also an envelope that holds all of their preliminary activities for the unit, such as note cards and outlines. Students will be satisfied and proud of themselves, being able to “see” everything they have worked so hard on throughout the unit. Technology Resources Various forms of technology will be used to enhance this unit. Students will work in the media center and the computer lab to utilize the technology available at the school. Also, the LCD projector will be used in the classroom to visually instruct students on note card format and other tasks. In the media center and computer lab, students will type their papers on computers, and watch instructional screencasts on MLA format and using Galileo. Students will also explore Galileo themselves to find resources for their papers. A wiki is also provided for students to access for additional help throughout the unit.
  3. 3. Wingate 3 Essential Questions Overarching Questions: Topical Questions: How can I find reliable information to incorporate in my research How can I avoid plagiarism in my research paper? paper? Why should I only use reliable sources in my research paper? How can I find information relevant to my research paper topic? How does women’s literature of the 19th century prove that they are How can I use Galileo to find reliable sources? repressed? How can I narrow my search in Galileo so that the number of results is manageable? How can I support my ideas and views about a topic with various How can I develop and write a research paper? sources without plagiarizing? How do we synthesize multiple sources and viewpoints in research? How can I organize my paper in a logical manner? How can I best convey my ideas and thoughts about a topic? How can I tell the difference between a primary and secondary source? GPS Standards Addressed WRITING ELA11W1 The student produces writing that establishes an appropriate organizational structure, sets a context and engages the reader, maintains a coherent focus throughout, and signals a satisfying closure. The student a. Establishes a clear, distinctive, and coherent thesis or perspective and maintains a consistent tone and focus throughout. b. Selects a focus, structure, and point of view relevant to the purpose, genre expectations, audience, length, and format requirements. c. Constructs arguable topic sentences, when applicable, to guide unified paragraphs. d. Uses precise language, action verbs, sensory details, appropriate modifiers, and active rather than passive voice. e. Writes texts of a length appropriate to address the topic or tell the story. f. Uses traditional structures for conveying information (i.e., chronological order, cause and effect, similarity and difference, and posing and answering a question). g. Supports statements and claims with anecdotes, descriptions, facts and statistics, and specific examples. ELA11W2 The student demonstrates competence in a variety of genres. The student produces expository (informational) writing to explain an idea or concept and/or convey information and ideas from primary and secondary sources accurately and coherently; the student: a. Engages the interest of the reader. b. Formulates a coherent thesis or controlling idea. c. Coherently develops the controlling idea and/or supports the thesis by incorporating evidence from both primary and secondary sources, as applicable. d. Conveys information and ideas from primary and secondary sources, when applicable, accurately and coherently. e. Includes a variety of information on relevant perspectives, as applicable.
  4. 4. Wingate 4 f. Maintains coherence by relating all topic sentences to the thesis or controlling idea, as applicable. g. Structures ideas and arguments effectively in a sustained way and follows an organizational pattern appropriate to the purpose and intended audience of the essay. h. Demonstrates an understanding of the elements of expository discourse (i.e., purpose, speaker, audience, form). i. Incorporates elements of discourse from other writing genres into exposition. j. Enhances meaning by employing rhetorical devices, including the use of parallelism, repetition, and analogy. k. Uses language, point of view, characterization, style, and related elements effectively for specific rhetorical and aesthetic purposes. l. Attains closure (i.e., by including a detailed summary of the main points, restating the thesis, generalizing the thesis or controlling idea for additional purposes, or employing a significant quotation that brings the argument in the composition together). The student produces technical writing that clearly, logically, and purposefully applies technical writing strategies acquired in previous grades in other genres of writing and in a variety of writing situations such as expository compositions, historical investigative reports, and literary analyses, by raising the level of critical thinking skills and rhetorical techniques and the sophistication of the language and style. ELA11W3 The student uses research and technology to support writing. The student a. Formulates clear research questions and utilizes appropriate research venues (i.e., library, electronic media, personal interview, survey) to locate and incorporate evidence from primary and secondary sources. b. Uses supporting evidence from multiple sources to develop the main ideas within the body of a researched essay, a composition, or a technical document. c. Synthesizes information from multiple sources and identifies complexities, discrepancies, and different perspectives found in a variety of media (i.e., almanacs, microfiche, news sources, in-depth field studies, speeches, journals, technical documents). d. Integrates quotations and citations into a written text while maintaining the flow of ideas. e. Uses appropriate conventions for documentation in the text, notes, and bibliographies by adhering to those in style manuals such as the Modern Language Association Handbook, The Chicago Manual of Style, Turabian, American Psychological Association, etc. f. Uses systematic strategies to organize and record information (i.e., anecdotal scripting, annotated bibliographies). g. Designs and publishes documents, using such aids as advanced publishing software and graphic programs. ELA11W4 The student practices both timed and process writing and, when applicable, uses the writing process to develop, revise, and evaluate writing. The student a. Plans and drafts independently and resourcefully. b. Revises writing to improve the logic and coherence of the organization and controlling perspective. c. Revises writing for specific audiences, purposes, and formality of the contexts. d. Revises writing to sharpen the precision of word choice and achieve desired tone. e. Revises text to highlight the individual voice and to improve sentence variety and style. f. Edits writing to improve word choice, grammar, punctuation, etc. g when applicable. CONVENTIONS ELA11C1 The student demonstrates understanding and control of the rules of the English language, realizing that usage involves the appropriate application of conventions and grammar in both written and spoken formats. The student a. Demonstrates an understanding of proper English usage and control of grammar, sentence and paragraph structure, diction, and syntax. b. Correctly uses clauses (i.e., main and subordinate), phrases (i.e., gerund, infinitive, and participial), and mechanics of punctuation (i.e., end marks, commas, semicolons, quotations marks, colons, ellipses, hyphens). c. Demonstrates an understanding of sentence construction (i.e., subordination, proper placement of modifiers, parallel structure) and proper English usage (i.e., consistency of verb tenses, agreement).
  5. 5. Wingate 5 ELA11C2 The student demonstrates understanding of manuscript form, realizing that different forms of writing require different formats. The student a. Produces writing that conforms to appropriate manuscript requirements. b. Produces legible work that shows accurate spelling and correct use of the conventions of punctuation and capitalization. c. Reflects appropriate format requirements, including pagination, spacing, and margins, and integration of source material with appropriate citations (i.e., in- text citations, use of direct quotations, paraphrase, and summary, and weaving of source and support materials with writer’s own words, etc.). d. Includes formal works cited or bibliography when applicable. Knowledge and Skills Knowledge Skills Students will know: Students will be able to: - How to do a keyword search in Galileo. - Use Galileo to find information on their women’s literature topic. - How to narrow their search in Galileo. - Create note cards to organize their research paper points. - The difference in PDF and HTML format. - Create works cited cards to record bibliographic information. - How to cite sources. - Write a research paper concerning the repression of women - How to avoid plagiarism in their research papers by during the 19th century. appropriately citing sources. - Synthesize information from several different sources to write a research paper on the repression of women during the 19th century. - Label sources as primary or secondary sources. Understandings: Students will understand that: - the research process can be applied to any topic to write an effective paper. - research papers synthesize ideas and perspectives from print, media, and other various sources, both primary and secondary. - assessing their own papers using the research paper rubric is necessary when writing a research paper. - a good research paper has an effective thesis statement that guides the reader through the paper. - differences in information needs lead to different means and sources for acquiring information. - effective arguments are organized and well-presented, which can be achieved by working through the writing process. Big Ideas from the Unit: Research Process, Writing Process, Use of Galileo, Primary & Secondary Sources, Synthesis of Information Core Tasks from the Unit: Writing an eight paragraph research paper, Using Galileo to find resources for the research paper, Creating a Works Cited page based on MLA format, Synthesizing information from various sources to complete a unified and understandable paper Related Misconceptions: - You can’t use someone else’s words in your paper at all
  6. 6. Wingate 6 - We have nothing in common with women of the 19th century - All articles that you can find online are the complete article - All paragraphs should have five sentences in them - Once you “finish” writing your paper, you’re done! (Students often times overlook the need to proofread and revise their work) Stage 3 Before beginning this unit, students will complete a unit on women’s literature during the 19th century. During this unit they will read Kate Chopin’s, “A Pair of Silk Stockings” and “The Story of an Hour,” Mary Wilkins Freeman’s “The Revolt of Mother,” and Susan Glaspell’s Trifles. Students will participate in several class activities to demonstrate their knowledge of these stories, and will complete a graphic organizer that collects the roles of women and their repression throughout these stories. They will also take a unit test on these stories at the end of the unit. W Where are your students headed and Why? What is required of them? Where are the students headed and why? The teacher will introduce the unit by giving students a content map. This content map will act as their “map” of the unit. It will provide a way for students to remember where they are, and see where they are going, in an organized fashion. Students will begin by filling in the four unit essential questions (overarching EQs) on their content map. The teacher will explain that these will be the “big questions” students will be able to answer at the end of the unit. - How can I find reliable information to incorporate in my research paper? - How does women’s literature of the 19th century prove that they are repressed? - How can I support my ideas and views about a topic with various sources without plagiarizing? - How can I best convey my ideas and thoughts about a topic? What is required of them? Students will then fill in the four major concepts of the unit, which will begin a discussion of what is required of them throughout the unit. The four major concepts are: Plagiarism/Works Cited, Galileo, Primary & Secondary Sources, and MLA Format. The teacher will explain to the students that they will learn information about each of these concepts that helps them to answer their unit essential questions. She will then
  7. 7. Wingate 7 provide them with detailed handouts concerning exactly what is expected of them in the unit. Overall descriptions and due dates will be provided for the following items: - Note Cards - Sentence Outlines - Rough Drafts - Final Drafts Students will be given their Research Paper Guidelines in handout format (page 13 of packet) and a Rubric for their Research Papers (page 14). Students will be aware of all that is expected of them from the beginning of the unit. How will the students be hooked and held in this unit? H There will be several assignments throughout the unit that “hook” students’ attention. The following are “HOOK” activities that will be used in the unit (based on several entry points): At the beginning of the unit… They may begin by doing a freewrite to answer the question: “Explain to me a time that you felt repressed like one of the women in our stories. How did you feel? What was your situation? Your circumstances? How did you “escape” the situation?” This will be done after the students have been tested on the women’s literature of the 19th century, but before they begin the research paper unit. Students will have seven minutes to answer these questions. They should immediately see the similarities between this writing prompt and the graphic organizer they completed during the unit on Women’s Literature, which asks for the women’s circumstances, feelings, and escape. Students will have the opportunity to share their responses with classmates, and a few volunteers can share with the class. The classroom teacher will make sure students make the connection with the women of the 19th century, how we have all felt “repressed” at some point in our lives. She will then explain that we are going to further look at the repression of the 19th century woman, and will do so by working through the research paper process. Starting the Primary and Secondary Source section of the unit… Students will visit the media center and use a copy of the local newspaper to select a story that they were either a part of, or could pretend they were a part of. They will be asked to read the story and then write a journal entry from the point of view of someone that was actually a part of the story. (For example, athletes may write a journal entry about the role they played in the big game covered in the paper, or students could pretend they were the local business owner who had their business broken in to). This will lead into a discussion of how these two accounts of the same
  8. 8. Wingate 8 event are different…one is a primary source, and one is a secondary source. The Plagiarism and Works Cited section of the unit… Students will be asked to write for seven minutes about a time that someone “stole their idea” or took credit for something they did. They should explain how they felt, and how the situation could have been different. Students will share their freewrites with partners, and this will lead to a class discussion about how it is unfair to use someone else’s ideas without giving them credit. The classroom teacher will relate this to plagiarism and the need for works cited pages in research papers. Starting the Galileo section of the unit… The media specialist will ask students where they would begin in the library if they were asked to completely research a topic from scratch. The media specialist will talk with students about different research possibilities, like the reference section, nonfiction section, internet, and Galileo. The media specialist will explain that the students will use Galileo today, and ask if any of them have any prior experience with the database. She will ask experienced students to share their own stories about working with Galileo. This will lead into a screencast examining the uses of Galileo. What activities, instruction, and guidance will be provided to enable and equip students to explore E and experience the important ideas in this unit? 1. Students will complete the “HOOK” activity that asks them to associate themselves with the repressed women of the 19th century by examining and sharing a time when they felt repressed. 2. Students will complete the “HOOK” activity about primary and secondary sources. They will then examine the difference between primary and secondary sources. Students will label the stories and the resource articles they are provided as either primary or secondary. Students will complete the section of their content maps for “Primary & Secondary Sources” 3. Students will be asked to bring fifteen note cards to class. They will be given a “note card outline” handout that explains how their note cards should be formatted. (This handout can be found on page 15 of this packet) 4. Students will work with their classroom teacher, using the graphic organizer they completed in the previous section, to find quotes from “A Pair of Silk Stockings” for their research papers. All students will write on “A Pair of Silk Stockings.” They will find quotes that show the main character’s circumstances, feelings, and escape. Students will complete a minimum of four note cards for this story. 5. Students will complete the “HOOK” activity for works cited information, completing a free write about how they feel when someone “steals their idea” or takes credit for something they have done. The classroom teacher will then relate this to plagiarism and the need for a works cited page. 6. The classroom teacher will use the Tennessee Model to teach students how to create works cited entries. Students will work to create entries as a class, with a partner, and finally, individually. Students will be provided with a handout outlining the way to create a works
  9. 9. Wingate 9 cited entry, following MLA format, for various types of resources. (This handout can be found on page 16 of this packet). Students will complete the section of their content maps for “Plagiarism & Works Cited.” 7. As a class, students will create a works cited card for “A Pair of Silk Stockings.” 8. Students will individually choose a second story to include in their paper from the four they read in class. Students will work individually to find quotes about the women’s circumstances, feelings, and escape in that story. Students will complete a minimum of four note cards and a works cited card for this story. (The media specialist will spend this day in the classroom with the students, assisting them with working through their sources, and becoming acquainted, firsthand, with their strengths and weaknesses. This will better prepare her to assist them on Galileo the following day.) 9. (Students will be in the media center for this activity) Students will complete the “HOOK” activity/discussion for the Galileo lesson. The media specialist will show students a screencast that explores the uses and features of Galileo. 10. (Students will be in the media center for this activity) Students will complete a brainstormed list, with the media specialist, of keywords they can use to search their topic in Galileo. Students will then work in pairs to find a source in Galileo for their research papers. They will be required to complete at least one note card and one works cited card. Students will complete the section of their content maps for “Galileo.” 11. After completing their note cards and works cited cards, students will submit them for grading. The teacher will then grade the note cards, making suggestions, and give them back to the students. They will then have an additional class day to modify or redo any note cards that they think should be changed. Note cards are worth one point a piece if they are done correctly. 12. Students will now beginning planning for their research papers by completing a Sentence Outline. This outline requires students to write their introduction and conclusion paragraphs on the outline. Students are then asked to write the introductory sentence and include relevant quotations for their three body paragraphs. As a class, students will write their introduction paragraph and first body paragraph together. (Students who need extra helped will be pulled on day two of working on the sentence outline and write their conclusion paragraphs and a second body paragraph with the inclusion teacher. This will be done in the media center, where the media specialist will also be available for extra help.) (The sentence outline can be found on pages 17-20 in this packet) 13. Students will share their completed sentence outlines with their partners. They will offer constructive criticism and evaluate each other’s work. Students will then revise their own outlines before beginning to write their papers. 14. Every student must conference with classroom teacher regarding their papers at least once during the process. 15. (Students will be in the computer lab for this activity) Students are now ready to begin writing their rough drafts. They will be required to type these papers using MLA format. In the lab, students will be shown a screencast for how to incorporate MLA format when writing their research papers. They will also be provided with a handout that gives directions for incorporating MLA format into their own papers. (This handout can be found on page 21 of this packet). Students will complete the portion of the content map for “MLA Format.” 16. The day that rough drafts are due, students will bring two copies of their papers to class. One copy they will turn in, the second copy they will grade themselves. The teacher will provide students with extra copies of the rubric. During class that day, they will grade their own paper and three classmates’ papers, giving constructive criticism and feedback. (“Extra Help” Version – Students needing extra help or extra time on this assignment will be asked to grade two classmates’ papers.) 17. After grading their own papers, receiving feedback from their peers, and receiving feedback from the teacher, students will revise their paper and create their final drafts. 18. After completing the research paper process, students will reflect on their experience and what they learned. They will answer the
  10. 10. Wingate 10 following questions: What grade do I think I deserve on the research paper and why? What was the hardest part of the research paper process to me? What will I do differently the next time I write a research paper? What is the most beneficial thing I learned from this research unit? Why is it important that I know how to write a research paper? **The following wiki was created to assist students throughout the unit: http://womenslitresearchunit.pbworks.com/FrontPage What activities, products and performances will be designed to provide students with the R opportunity to reflect, rethink, and revise? Several activities in this unit allow students to reflect, rethink, and revise. These activities are: Students can Reflect: - Hook Activity for Beginning the Unit: Students reflect upon a time that they felt “repressed” and associate themselves with the women of the 19th century. - Hook Activity for Primary and Secondary Sources of the Unit: Students will participate in a class discussion where they reflect on the differences between primary and secondary sources. - Hook Activity for the Plagiarism section of the Unit: Students are asked to reflect on how they felt when someone “stole their idea,” and how that situation could have been avoided. - Students reflect on their research paper by grading it themselves the day rough drafts are due. - Students are able to reflect on the entire research paper process at the end of the unit by answering questions about what they learned and found to be beneficial. Students can Rethink/Revise: - Students are given the opportunity to rethink/revise their note cards after they are graded by the teacher. - Students rethink/revise their sentence outlines after receiving constructive criticism from a peer. - Students rethink/revise their rough drafts to create final drafts after reflecting on their own work and receiving feedback from their peers and the teacher.
  11. 11. Wingate 11 T How will instruction and activities be tailored to provide for the various learning needs, styles, knowledge and interests of students? This unit is being taught to two inclusion classes and one remedial class. As a result, there are several portions of this unit allow students to have extra time and extra help if needed. Even though the classes are inclusion classes, several students do perform on grade level. Therefore, it is important that the unit accommodates the needs of all the students and the variety of learning abilities present in the classes. Ways of Teaching to Different Learning Modalities: Visual: Students are provided a graphic organizer to visually organize the central ideas of the research paper-the circumstances, feelings, and escapes of women during the 19th century. Screencasts are used so that students can see the identified task being completed before they are asked to do it themselves. Also, the Tennessee Model of instruction is used where students see the teacher complete portions of the unit on the overhead, modeling for them what they will later be asked to do individually. Interpersonal: Students are given the opportunity to work as a class and with partners many times throughout this unit. Therefore, the students with strong social skills are allowed to flourish through group work. Also, several class discussion are included throughout the unit. Kinesthetic: Several activities in this unit are suited perfectly for the kinesthetic learner. Students take a hands-on approach by actually looking through sources, using Galileo, working on a computer, and completing their own note cards. Verbal: All directions are given in this unit verbally. Also, class discussions are used to emphasize key points and expand on key ideas. Also, the screencasts explain the task at hand while showing the task at hand. Intrapersonal: The needs of students who desire to work alone are met through the individual practice assignments in this unit. Ultimately, students write their own papers individually, create several note cards on their own, and write their sentence outlines individually. Logical: Students logic and organization is appealed to through the sentence outline, formulaic outline for note cards, and detailed rubric that is given to the students at the beginning of the unit. Modifications for Special Needs Students: Students with ADHD: Students with ADHD will have assignments broken down for them. For example, note cards will be completed in groups of five, rather that attempting all twenty at once. Students will also be asked to report smaller portions back to the teacher as they complete assignments. Also, students will be partnered with focused and driven students during partner activities.
  12. 12. Wingate 12 Students with Learning Disabilities: These students will also have their work broken down into smaller, more manageable parts. Also, some of the assignments may be shortened. And finally, the inclusion teacher in the room will pull these students for additional help, such as writing the conclusion and an additional body paragraph together. How will learning experiences be organized/sequenced to provide for greatest O acquisition/understanding Students will work through the “Steps in the Research Paper Process,” which will be displayed on the board. These steps are: - Determine Your Topic - Research Your Topic (At this step students will explore Plagiarism, Works Cited Pages, Primary and Secondary sources, and use Galileo) - Decide on a Thesis - Create Three Sub-topics - Prepare the Sentence Outline - Write Your Rough Draft (At this step students will explore MLA format) - Revise Your Rough Draft - Write Your Final Draft - Submit Your Final Draft with a Works Cited Page There are also several parts of this unit that are provided to students for the purpose of organization. They are: - The Content Map (Helps students organize the material in the unit as they progress through it) - Sentence Outline (Helps students organize their research papers) - Research Paper Guidelines Handout (Handout provides due dates and a grade chart) Research Paper Guidelines Name ________________________
  13. 13. Wingate 13 The research paper accounts for four test grades this semester. Your grade is based on the product itself, which is two test grades, and your participation in the writing process. One of the predominant objectives of the research paper is to see you work through the steps of the writing process. Your greatest challenge is to remain on task and use your time wisely.  No “late” papers (or any of the items below) are accepted, no matter if you are absent or present, without penalty. A deadline is a deadline – no excuses will be accepted. For every day an item is late, twenty points will be deducted. I will not accept it more than two days late.  We dedicate two weeks to doing research. I will provide you with several sources to use in your paper, and you will be required to find at least one source using Galileo.  If I do not see you actively working on your paper on a daily basis, I will not accept one from you.  I will not accept a final draft from you unless you write the rough draft.  You must conference with me individually ONE time. This conference needs to refer to your lead-ins to the quotations and to the appropriateness of the quotes you have selected. If you have nothing written, I cannot gauge the accuracy of your work. DUE DATES February 24-25 – Twenty notecards are due – 12 from the secondary sources and eight from the primary sources. You must also have at least 5 works cited cards turned in as well. All cards should be written on 3 x 5 index cards (plain white). **NOTE: Choose one story on your own about which to write. Limit six secondary source cards to that story and four from the primary source. We will ALL write on “A Pair of Silk Stockings,” so your other ten note cards should be about that selection. March 2 – Sentence outline is due. March 3 – Introductory paragraph is due. March 12 – Rough Draft due March 18 and 19 – Final Draft is due. We will go to the computer lab to type the paper. All final drafts must be typed according to MLA format. Use size 12- point font, Times New Roman. No other font should be used. No hand-written papers will be accepted. You will also turn in a manila envelope in which you will place your rough draft, your note cards, your works cited cards. This envelope will count as a test grade. Write down each grade in the grade column below. Assignment Due Date Worth Grade Note Cards/Works Cited Cards February 25 25 points One Quiz Grade Sentence Outline March 2 35 points Introduction March 3 40 points Daily Checks Randomly 100 points each check Daily Grades (I will be checking to see if you are working, using your time wisely, etc. If you are talking, relaxing, or otherwise off task, your grade will reflect your work ethic.) Conferences ___/___/10 100 points One quiz grade Rough Draft February 12 100 points One test grade. Envelope March 22 100 points One test grade Final Draft March 22 200 points Two test grades
  14. 14. Wingate 14 Rubric for Draft of Research Paper Name ______________________________ Pd____ 4 pts. 6 pts. 8 pts. 10 pts. MLA Format MLA format not apparent Major errors in MLA format Few errors in heading, Paper is done in completely (Facet of Understanding- margins, body, works cited correct MLA Format Application) Intro/Body Paragraphs Missing Intro paragraph and Present, but major errors—or Present with few errors Intro paragraph and Body Done in Class Body Paragraphs Done in placed incorrectly Paragraphs Done in Class are Class typed and placed correctly The following applies to paragraphs you wrote, not the ones we did together in class. Transitions and Paragraphs lack transitions No transitions, weak topic Some transitions but very Varied and interesting Topic Sentences back to thesis and have no sentences good topic sentences transitions with relevant topic topic sentences sentences Quotations in Body Quotations are not punctuated Lead-ins are incorrect with Basic lead-ins, but correct One Primary and Secondary Paragraphs correctly; no lead-ins errors in punctuation; only one punctuation; 2 quotes per Source per body paragraph (Facet of Understanding- quote per paragraph paragraph with varied and interesting Perspective) lead-ins, both direct and integrated Quote Synthesis and All quotes used do not support Several quotes used do not One or two quotes used in All quotes used fully support Interpretation the paper or paragraph’s support the paper or paper do not support the paper the paper or paragraph’s (Facet of Understanding- meaning and purpose paragraph’s meaning and or paragraph’s meaning and meaning and purpose Interpretation) purpose purpose Parenthetical Quotes lack parenthetical Some quotes have Parenthetical documentation is Parenthetical Documentation Documentation documentation parenthetical documentation, present for all quotes, but has for all quotes done correctly but not all some errors. Works Cited No works cited page included Major errors in works cited, or Citations mostly correct, All citations correct and only (Facet of Understanding- missing entry(ies) for works include citations not in paper works cited in paper are Application) cited in paper included Ideas Developed Ideas are confusing to reader Ideas are confusing at points Ideas are not confusing to Ideas are fully developed and (Facet of Understanding- and not developed at all during the paper because ideas reader, but paper lacks understandable for reader Explanation) are very minimally developed complete development of ideas Grammar/Mechanics/ Lack of punctuation and Major errors, sentence Few errors that interfere with Very few errors that do not Punctuation serious errors hinder fragments, run-ons that hinder understanding interfere with understanding comprehension comprehension Number of Paragraphs Lack of paragraph breaks or Missing 2 paragraphs Missing one paragraph Intro, 6 body paragraphs, and missing 3 or more paragraphs Conclusion
  15. 15. Wingate 15 How to Format a Note Card: Designated as __________________________________________________________________ Primary or __________________________________________________________________ Secondary Source Note card Labeled as: __________________________________________________________________ Circumstances/Feelings/OR Escape __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Quote from Source __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Number According to __________________________________________________________________ Label __________________________________________________________________ How to Format a Works Cited Card: Works Cited __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ Works Cited Entry According to MLA __________________________________________________________________ Format Requirements __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________ __________________________________________________________________
  16. 16. Wingate 16 Books First or single author's name is written last name, first name. The basic form for a book citation is: Last name, First name. Title of Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, Year of Publication. If there is more than one author, the first author’s name is written last name first; subsequent author names are written first name, last name. Gillespie, Paula, and Neal Lerner. The Allyn and Bacon Guide to Peer Tutoring. Boston: Allyn, 2000. An Article in a Newspaper or Magazine Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Periodical Day Month Year: pages. An Article in a Scholarly Journal Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume.Issue (Year): pages. An Entire Web Site Name of Site. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization affiliated with the site (sometimes found in copyright statements). Date you accessed the site <electronic address>. A Page on a Web Site For an individual page on a Web site, list the author or alias if known, followed by the information covered above for entire Web sites. Make sure the URL points to the exact page you are referring to. An Article in a Web Magazine Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name . "Title of Article." Title of Online Publication. Date of Publication. Date of Access<electronic address>. A Short Story in an Anthology Author’s Last Name, Author’s First Name. “Title of Story.” Title of Book. Name of Editor. Edition/Volume. City of Publication: Publisher, Year. Page numbers.
  17. 17. Wingate 17 Sentence Outline for Women’s Literature Research Paper: Name ______________________________ Write neatly on this sheet, or you may type, but you must follow this outline format. I. Introduction Paragraph Begin by giving one or two broad statements about the roles and rights of women in the nineteenth century. Introduce the two stories you will e examining in your paper. Give a brief plot synopsis of both. Mention how these stories support the general statements that you have already introduced. Conclude with your thesis statement – the last sentence of your paragraph. ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________ Thesis Statement:_____________________________________________________________________________________________ II. Paragraph about feelings in “A Pair of Silk Stockings” A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ III. Paragraph about circumstances in “A Pair of Silk Stockings” A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________
  18. 18. Wingate 18 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ IV. Paragraph about escape in “A Pair of Silk Stockings” A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ V. Paragraph about feelings in the short story of your choice A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________
  19. 19. Wingate 19 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ VI. Paragraph about circumstances in the short story of your choice A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ VII. Paragraph about escape in the short story of your choice A. Topic Sentence__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. 1st quote used___________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. 2nd quote used__________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ VIII. Conclusion A. A sentence that rewords the thesis statement _________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. Make a comment on how women still face stereotyping or discrimination today and also how their lives have dramatically changed since the nineteenth century. Include thoughts about your two protagonists and how their lives would be quite different if they were living in the twenty-first century.
  20. 20. Wingate 20 ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. A sentence that offers a final comment on the paper ____________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________
  21. 21. Wingate 21 MLA Format When typing your paper make sure to: • Double Space On your toolbar go to Format and then Paragraph. Find the section labeled Spacing, then Line Spacing. Click on the arrow and select double. • Set your margins to one inch On your toolbar go to File and then Page Setup. Under Margins, type in “1” for top, bottom, left and right. • Include your name and page number in the upper right hand corner of each page On your toolbar go to View and then Header and Footer. Click on the right align key, which looks like this: Type in your Last Name and click on the icon that is shown below to insert page numbers: Click on Close to close the header and footer toolbar. • In the upper left hand corner list: Your Name Mrs. Wingate 9th Grade Literature Date (Day Month Year) • Center the title, but do not underline it, italicize it, or put it in quotation marks The first page of your paper should look like the following: Smith 1 John Smith Mrs. Smith American Literature 18 March 2010 Women’s Literature What does history say about women and the respect, or lack of it, they traditionally
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