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Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy
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Cilassapplearningandteachingphilosophy

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  • 1. Dr. Nadine Wills : CILASS Academic Fellow Scheme Application (adjusted presentation on learning and teaching philosophy)
  • 2. I gave the following presentation on my teaching philosophy for a Film Studies Professor position in Canada at the same time that I was interviewed here. For a number of reasons, I decided to accept this position instead but this gives you an excellent overview of my approach to learning and teaching. Original Interview Presentation Monday, June 25, 2007
  • 3. Characteristics of effective teaching (Part 1) <ul><li>Reflect upon her own practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Develop herself. </li></ul><ul><li>Awareness of the diversity of the student population. </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding of equitable practice. </li></ul><ul><li>Providing examples of learning for students. </li></ul>
  • 4. Characteristics of effective teaching (Part 2) <ul><li>Effective teaching sessions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Clarity of explanations. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Effective use of oral questioning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Stimulation/encouragement of student interest (that leads to independent inquiry). </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Encourages of student involvement/participation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Evaluation of student learning. </li></ul><ul><li>Variety of assessment methods. </li></ul><ul><li>Original Source: UK Universities’ Staff Development Unit (1994), adapted </li></ul>
  • 5. Students as Professionals <ul><li>Students are expected to: </li></ul><ul><li>Behave in an appropriate manner </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Casual and fun atmosphere based on mutual respect, purpose and support) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Take responsibility for themselves and their own learning (meeting deadlines etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Progressively move into the mode of PROFESSIONAL (scholar, researcher, employer/employee) </li></ul>
  • 6. 9 Mantras for teaching <ul><li>Students need to see the whole picture </li></ul><ul><li>Students are selectively attentive </li></ul><ul><li>Students are driven by assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Students often only memorize if they do not do not make knowledge their own </li></ul><ul><li>Students’ attention is limited </li></ul><ul><li>Students can be easily overburdened </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn well by doing </li></ul><ul><li>Students learn well when they take responsibility for their learning </li></ul><ul><li>Students have feelings Original Source: Gibbs and Habeshaw (1989: 15-38) (adapted) </li></ul>
  • 7. Getting the balance right <ul><li>Rigid and transparent framework </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deadlines important (no missed tests etc.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Forms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Continuous assessment/pressure/support </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Contrasted with casual tone/humour in class </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity/freedom encouraged in assessment </li></ul><ul><li>Constant negotiation of the learning process </li></ul><ul><li>Moving away from strict “lecture” mode </li></ul>
  • 8. CIVEST
  • 9. CIVEST <ul><li>C = Clarity </li></ul><ul><li>I = Interdisciplinarity </li></ul><ul><li>V = VARK (Visual, Audio, Reading/Writing, Kinaesthetic Learners) </li></ul><ul><li>E = Empower and Evolve </li></ul><ul><li>S = Soft Skills </li></ul><ul><li>T = Technology </li></ul>
  • 10. Clarity <ul><li>Learning outcomes (continuously come back to these) </li></ul><ul><li>Especially make connections what “real life” application is </li></ul><ul><li>Boundaries and goal-setting </li></ul><ul><li>Repetition (in assessment and terms) </li></ul><ul><li>Clear what they can expect from me and vice versa </li></ul>
  • 11. Interdisciplinarity <ul><li>Between subjects </li></ul><ul><li>Patterns </li></ul><ul><li>Someone who makes connections </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity </li></ul><ul><li>Problem-solver (focus on solutions rather than obstacles) </li></ul>
  • 12. VARK <ul><li>Students learn in different ways </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Visual </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Audio </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reading/Writing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Kinaesthetic </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ex. 180° Rule </li></ul><ul><li>Body language and gestures, eye contact important </li></ul><ul><li>Translate theory into equations </li></ul><ul><li>Ex. Mulvey and “to-be-looked-at-ness” </li></ul><ul><li>Man=eyes=camera=desire, Woman=body=art=object of desire </li></ul>
  • 13. Empower and Evolve <ul><li>Student ownership/responsibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Choosing essay/subject (distribution of assessment) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop forms </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time needed to complete take (3 ½ minutes?) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Development from amateur to professional </li></ul><ul><li>Reflecting on development and practice </li></ul><ul><li>Sharing “Best Practice” </li></ul>
  • 14. Skills <ul><li>Skills vs. Knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Soft skills </li></ul><ul><li>Knowledge and theory quickly outdated </li></ul><ul><li>Need to know how to use resources, research </li></ul><ul><li>Lateral rather than just linear connections </li></ul><ul><li>Students as human beings </li></ul><ul><li>Teacher as life coach </li></ul>
  • 15. Technology <ul><li>Technology is often used as a barrier to learning </li></ul><ul><li>Use of technology routinized </li></ul><ul><li>How to incorporate it into the classroom/learning in a spontaneous and innovative way? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Youtube </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Blog </li></ul></ul>
  • 16. Main Strategy for making Film Studies relevant at the School of Community and Liberal Studies <ul><li>CLARIFY. </li></ul><ul><li>EXAMPLE. </li></ul><ul><li>WHY? </li></ul><ul><li>APPLY. </li></ul>
  • 17. Achieving Learning Outcomes <ul><li>Problem-based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Development of student judgement </li></ul><ul><li>Self assessment and peer feedback alongside course evaluation </li></ul><ul><li>Varied assignments </li></ul><ul><li>Group work (learning from each other) </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiated goals </li></ul><ul><li>Engaging learning tasks </li></ul><ul><li>Cooperative learning </li></ul><ul><li>Success measured on a series of different levels </li></ul><ul><li>Source: Gibbs (1992: 44) </li></ul>
  • 18. Providing Examples of Learning/Feedback <ul><li>I give this to students before they do their first one-on-one peer assessment (we also “playact” it out once with me in front of the entire class to model “skilled” and “unskilled” ways of doing this) </li></ul><ul><li>Gage how much criticism the person can handle. </li></ul><ul><li>Start off with what you liked best about the piece. </li></ul><ul><li>Be considerate with your criticism (constructive and brief) </li></ul><ul><li>Be specific with your criticism and praise </li></ul>
  • 19. Problems with Assessment <ul><li>Overload of students and staff </li></ul><ul><li>Fuzzy or non-existent criteria </li></ul><ul><li>Undue precision and specificity in marking schemes </li></ul><ul><li>Students do not know what is expected of them beforehand (give precise examples of what they must do to get precise marks) </li></ul><ul><li>Inadequate or superficial feedback provided (when it is given, usually after marks which is too late) </li></ul>
  • 20. Assessment <ul><li>Finding alternatives to presentations and exams to test knowledge: </li></ul><ul><li>Storyboard </li></ul><ul><li>Question Week </li></ul><ul><li>Thesis Statement </li></ul><ul><li>Essay Organization </li></ul><ul><li>Partner Feedback form (student creation) </li></ul><ul><li>Participation Form (and evaluation of my feedback of their work) </li></ul>
  • 21. Teaching Demonstration “ El Tango de Roxanne” from Moulin Rouge (Baz Luhrmann, 2001): Rape as Dance/Editing as Audience

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