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Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake
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Brown new zealand mud snails in capitol lake

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  • 1. New Zealand mud snails (Potamopyrus antipodarum) In Capitol Lake
  • 2. • Small aquatic snail • Parthenogenic • High reproductive potential ▫ 20-120 offspring/year • High-density populations ▫ 100,000-500,000/m2 • Tolerant of moderate salinity levels (17-24 pss)
  • 3. Impacts • Outcompete native gastropods by consuming large quantities of primary production • Do not serve as an equivalent food source – NZMS pass through fish guts undigested. • Restricted recreational opportunities. • Increased costs to aquaculture and municipal water control facilities.
  • 4. Western Expansion
  • 5. Vectors • Fish hatcheries and associated stocking operations • Recreational watercraft and trailers • Anglers and hunters • Sand and gravel mining, dredging • Commercial shipping • Pets, fish and wildlife • Natural resource management activities
  • 6. Response ▫ Fish and Wildlife – state and federal ▫ General Administration ▫ Ecology ▫ Natural Resources ▫ City of Olympia ▫ Invasive Species Council • October 2009 – snails found • November 2009 ▫ Agencies notified ▫ Response work group formed ▫ Closed lake • December 2009 ▫ Partial lake drawdown + Freeze • March 2010 ▫ Lake drained and filled with water from Budd Inlet • July 2010 ▫ Survey around lake
  • 7. Freeze results 0 1 2 3 4 5 Time (days) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 Survivalrate Day 0 ~ 20,000 NZMS/m2 Day 5 ~ 400 NZMS/m2
  • 8. Saltwater back flush
  • 9. • 25 sites sampled • Day 1: Fill water 28.7 pss • Salinity levels declined with freshwater inputs from Deschutes River • NZMS likely exposed to salinities above 20 for 7- 8 hours.
  • 10. 12% mortality from backflush Impact on NZMS
  • 11. Impact on resident benthic invertebrates • Negative impact ▫ Abundance ▫ Species richness • Community could recover to similar diversity and abundance ▫ Overall community structure (based on feeding groups) remained similar before and after backflush. 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 6000 7000 8000 9000 Pre-Backflush Treatment Post-Backflush Treatment AverageTotalAbundanceofBenthicMacroinvertebrate Organisms/M2 Pre-Backflush Post-Backflush AverageTotalAbundance/M2
  • 12. What’s next? • Continue containment • Freeze • Permanent plots established to look at long-term response • Small-scale trials of higher salt concentrations or other treatments
  • 13. www.invasivespecies.wa.gov wendy.brown@invasivespecies.wa.gov

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