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  • Answers might include research may help you understand job availabilities and pay ranges

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  • 1. Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 2. Planning For Your Future Career Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill “ Because of technological changes occurring now, many jobs that will be available in 10 years have not been thought of or created.” How do you plan for a career you know nothing about?
  • 3. What Job Would You Love To Do? Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Go to http://finance07.glencoe.com/
    • Enter the Student Center
    • Select Unit 1, Chapter 2
    • Click on Web Links
    • Choose: http://www.careeronestop.org/CareerTools/CareerTools.asp
    • Start with Career Exploration
    • Complete:
    • Assess Yourself
      • When you get to the Assessment screen, scroll down and complete the Skills Profiler
    • Go on and complete:
      • Explore Career Options
      • Gain Skills
      • Find a Job
      • Manage Your Career
    Make a list of 5 careers that you may be interested in.
  • 4.
    • What You’ll Learn
    • Section 2.1
      • Identify the personal issues to consider when choosing and planning your career.
      • Explain how education and training affect career advancement.
      • Discuss the factors that influence employment.
    • Section 2.2
      • Describe effective strategies to obtain employment.
      • Identify sources of career opportunities.
      • Identify the financial and legal issues to consider when looking for employment.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
  • 5.
    • Planning for Life
    • Q: Career plans are for people who do not know what they want. I know already that I want a high-paying job. So why should I bother thinking about career planning?
    • A: Money is just one motivation for work. You need to consider many other factors as well. Career planning considers your personal values, goals, and interests, the basics for any career decision. Since you will probably spend the majority of your life working, consider the old adage: “Choose a career you love, and the money will follow.”
    • Go to finance07.glencoe.com to complete the Standard & Poor’s Financial Focus activity.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 2 Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 6.
    • Main Idea
    • Choosing and planning for the right career will help you find fulfillment both personally and financially.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Why will choosing the right career help you find both personal satisfaction and financial security? Section 2.1 Planning Your Career 3 Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 7.
    • Choosing a Career
    • Some people find true satisfaction in their work, while others work just to make money.
    • You can choose whether to:
      • Get a job just to earn money.
      • Prepare for a career.
    • Ensuring that your career will fulfill your personal and financial goals requires planning.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career Use the Internet and find at least two career planning sites that are available online. Write the URL in your Notebook. Use keywords: career planning, job planning, help with resume. job work that you do mainly to earn money career a commitment to work in a field that you find interesting and fulfilling
  • 8.
    • Career Decision Trade-Offs
    • Your choice of career will affect:
      • The amount of money you make
      • The people you meet
      • How much spare time you have
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 9.
    • Choosing a Career
    • People make career decisions based on whether they want to:
      • Simply maintain a standard of living
      • Pay for the hobbies and activities they enjoy
      • Pursue careers that provide them with both money and personal fulfillment
      • Select careers that reflect their interests, values, and goals
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career standard of living a measure of quality of life based on the amounts and kinds of goods and services a person can buy
  • 10.
    • Opportunity Costs
    • Choosing a career will involve trade-offs, or opportunity costs.
    • Recent trends indicate that some people are making career decisions that allow them to:
      • Spend more time with their families
      • Enjoy their hobbies and interests
      • Run their own business
    • The more you know about your own interests, values, needs, and goals, the better you will be able to choose a career that will provide a balance between personal satisfaction and financial rewards.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career trends developments that mark changes in a particular area
  • 11.
    • Career Training and Skill Development
    • Acquiring more education will help you to:
      • Increase your potential earning power.
      • Meet your financial goals.
      • Increase your chances for success.
    • Your field of study will also affect your salary.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career potential earning power the amount of money you may earn over time
  • 12.
    • Checklist for Success
    • You will be an asset to any employer if you:
      • Work well with others
      • Strive to do your best
      • Are creative when solving problems
      • Communicate well
      • Understand yourself and other people
    • These basic qualities and skills make success more likely in most job situations.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 13.
    • Personal Factors
    • You can take special tests to learn more about your:
      • Abilities
      • Interests
      • Personal qualities
    • These tests—called aptitude tests and interest inventories —may give you an edge in choosing a career.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career aptitudes the natural abilities that people possess interest inventories tests that help you identify the activities you enjoy the most
  • 14.
    • Stages of Career Planning
    • Before you make any decisions about your career, you should review your situation.
    • Your progress will depend on:
      • Your opportunity costs
      • The choices that are available to you
      • Your career area
    • Talking to people in your field of interest can help you with your career planning.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 15. Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 16.
    • External Factors and Opportunities
    • Before you begin your job search, you should take into consideration:
      • Social influences
      • Economic factors
      • Trends
    • These factors directly affect the job market and the opportunities that are available to you.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 17.
    • External Influences on Your Career
    • When you consider your career options, you need to focus on:
      • Your skills
      • Your training
      • Your experience
      • Social influences
      • Economic conditions
      • Industry trends
    • You may have no control over the “big picture” factors, but you can make some personal decisions based on real-world influences.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 18.
    • Social Influences
    • Demographic trends can affect your employment opportunities. Some examples of demographic trends that have affected the job market are:
      • More working parents
      • More leisure time
      • More elderly people in the overall population
      • Greater demand for ongoing employment training
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career demographic trends tendencies of people grouped by age, gender, ethnicity, education, or income that change over time
  • 19.
    • Geographic Trends
    • Geographic location also influences earning level. In recent years, geographic trends have indicated that some of the fastest-growing job markets are in:
      • Florida
      • Nevada
      • Arizona
      • Arkansas
      • New Jersey
      • California
    • Remember to consider differences in earning levels and costs of living as you decide where to look for employment.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career geographic trends tendencies of people moving from one area of the country to another as financial centers shift location
  • 20.
    • Economic Factors
    • Since the job market changes as the economy does, the demand for certain types of jobs changes.
    • Some economic factors that can reduce career opportunities are:
      • High interest rates
      • Price increases
      • Decreased demand for certain goods and services
    • Being aware of current economic trends will help you to choose a career so that you can achieve your financial goals.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career
  • 21. Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill 18 Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Career Center At your school’s career center, you will find a variety of free information that can help you with college choices, r é sum é preparation, job opportunities, and career counseling. How can researching different careers that interest you help your financial planning for the future?
  • 22.
    • Trends in Industry and Technology
    • Changes in industry and technology also affect the job market.
    • While opportunities have dwindled in some areas of the economy, such as manufacturing, opportunities in other areas—such as service industries —have grown. Some examples of service industries include:
      • Computer or telecommunications technology
      • Health care
      • Social services
      • Hospitality services
      • Management
      • Education
      • Financial services
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.1 Planning Your Career service industries businesses that provide services for a fee, offer employment potential in coming years
  • 23. Career Exploration WebQuest Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 24.
    • Main Idea
    • Learn effective strategies to help you get the job or career that meets your personal and financial goals.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill What are some strategies you think might be effective in obtaining employment experience? Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development 20 Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill
  • 25.
    • Employment Search Strategies
    • As you take steps to search for a job, your level of success will depend upon:
      • How well you communicate the value of the experience you already have
      • How effectively you use proven employment strategies
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 26.
    • Obtaining Employment Experience
    • As you enter the world of work, you may worry that you do not have enough experience.
    • You may be overlooking the importance of various kinds of work-related training, including:
      • Part-time work
      • Volunteer work
      • Internships and cooperative education
      • Class projects or after-school activities
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development Create a list of all of your employment experience (babysitting, lawn mowing, shoveling, jobs, etc.)
  • 27.
    • Types of Work-Related Training
    • When you volunteer with places such as nonprofit community organizations and government agencies, you can:
      • Learn new skills
      • Develop good work habits
      • Make professional contacts
    • Working as a “temp” is a good way to gain experience and learn more about a particular field.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development Create a list of all your volunteer work (church, Salvation Army, etc.
  • 28.
    • Internships and Cooperative Education
    • An i nternship may:
      • Give you the experience you need to obtain employment
      • Lead to permanent employment
      • Allow you a chance to practice your application and interviewing skills
    • Cooperative education programs are another way to apply the workplace skills you learn in class to an actual business environment.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development Create a list of any internships you have completed. internship a position in which a person receives training by working with people who are experienced in a particular field cooperative education programs that allow students to enhance classroom learning with part-time work related to their majors and interests
  • 29.
    • Class Projects or After-School Activities
    • Class assignments and school activities can be sources of work-related experience. They can help you gain valuable career skills such as:
      • Managing, organizing, and coordinating people
      • Public speaking
      • Goal setting, planning, and supervising
      • Financial planning and budgeting
      • Conducting research
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development Create a list of all of your school activities (sports, clubs, forensics, etc.
  • 30.
    • Career Information Sources
    • You need up-to-date information to make the best career decisions. Many sources of information are available to you, including:
      • Mass media
      • The Internet
      • School guidance offices
      • Community organizations
      • Professional organizations
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 31.
    • Contacts
    • Contacts are another good source of advice and information as you prepare for a career. Your contacts are your:
      • Family
      • Friends
      • Coworkers
      • Teachers
      • Professors
      • Former employers
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development Create a list of at least 3 good references. Include their name, title, address, phone, email, etc.) DO NOT use family members!
  • 32.
    • Networking
    • Even people whom you do not know can assist you in a job search. That is why it is never too late to begin networking .
    • Your contacts may:
      • Know someone who can hire you
      • Be able to arrange an informational interview
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development networking a way of making and using contacts to get job information and advice informational interview a meeting with someone who works in your area of interest who can provide you with practical information about the career or company you are considering
  • 33.
    • Identifying Job Opportunities
    • If you are going to find employment that is right for you, you need to know where to look for job openings. Explore sources such as:
      • Job advertisements
      • Job fairs
      • Employment agencies
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 34.
    • Job Advertisements
    • All newspapers have classified ads that include job listings; some list both local jobs and those from a wide geographic area.
    • You can also use the Internet as a valuable source for job opportunities. On the Internet, you can:
      • Use a search engine to find a company’s Web site and learn more about it
      • Find a company’s list of current job openings
      • Use job-search Web sites with job advertisements, advice, and r é sum é services
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 35.
    • Job Fairs
    • At a job fair, recruiters from local and national companies set up tables or booths where you can:
      • Discuss job opportunities
      • Submit your r é sum é
    • To make the most of a job fair, be prepared to make your best impression on several recruiters in a short amount of time. They may call you in for an in-depth interview at a later date.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 36.
    • Employment Agencies
    • Employment agencies are businesses that match job hunters with employers. The employment agency fee may be paid by:
      • The company that hires you
      • You
      • You and your new employer
    • Do not get involved with agencies that ask you to pay a fee without promising you a job in return.
    • To find out more about employment agencies, contact your state’s employment service or department of labor.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 37.
    • Other Ways to Find a Job
    • Your ability to find a job is limited only by your imagination and energy. Other ways to find a job include:
      • Visiting specific companies where you would like to work
      • Calling local businesses in your field of interest
      • Talking to people with similar interests who have already graduated from your school
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 38. Career Planning Project #1 Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Using Xtranormal of the online slide show creator listed below: Create a presentation about the career you researched. Include the following in your presentation: Nature of the Work Training, Other Qualifications, and Advancement Employment Job Outlook Projections Earnings Wages Related Occupations Sources of Additional Information
  • 39.
    • Applying for a Job
    • Making the best possible presentation of your skills and experience is the key to landing a job.
    • Your r é sum é is your most important tool. The two basic types of r é sum é s are the:
      • Chronological r é sum é
      • Skills r és um é
    • Your r é sum é provides prospective employers with an overview of the special contribution you may be able to make to their companies.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development r é sum é a one- or two-page summary of your education, training, experience, and qualifications
  • 40. Career Planning Project #2--Resume Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Create a Resume for yourself. Use the examples shown in class and the textbook (page 46) as your guide.
  • 41.
    • Cover Letters
    • You will want to include a cover letter with your résumé when you send it to an employer by:
      • Regular mail
      • E-mail
      • Fax
    • The cover letter tells a potential employer why you are interested in a particular job and why you think that it would be worthwhile for him or her to interview you.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development cover letter the personal letter that you present along with your r é sum é
  • 42. Planning Your Career Project #3—Cover Letter Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Using the cover letter in the book (page 47) or examples shown in class, create a cover letter applying for a job in your are of interest.
  • 43.
    • Preparing for the Interview
    • If you are granted an interview , you should obtain as much information as you can about the company or industry before your interview. Possible resources include:
      • The library
      • The Internet
      • Informal interviews with people who are familiar with that company or industry
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development interview a formal meeting with your potential employer that allows you to express why you think you are the best person for the job
  • 44. Career Planning Project #4—Job Application Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Complete an Application For Employment
  • 45.
    • The Interview
    • Here are some typical questions an employer might ask:
      • What education and training qualify you for this job?
      • Why are you interested in working for this company?
      • Other than past jobs, what experiences have helped prepare you for this job?
      • What are your major strengths? Major weaknesses?
    • After the interview, send your interviewer a note reiterating your interest and expressing your thanks for the opportunity to interview.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 46.
    • Considering a Job Offer
    • Before you accept an offer, you have to consider several factors. Find out all you can about:
      • The company
      • The job itself
      • The working environment
      • The salary
      • Any other benefits
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 47.
    • The Work Environment
    • As you go on interviews, you will notice differences in workplaces.
    • Ask about official company policies:
      • How does the company handle pay increases?
      • How does it measure the quality of employees’ work?
      • How does it decide which employees to promote?
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 48.
    • Factors Affecting Salary
    • Your beginning salary will depend on:
      • Your education and experience
      • The size of the company
      • The average salary for the job you are considering
    • To make sure that you are starting with a fair salary, talk to people with similar jobs at other companies or look for related information on the Internet.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 49.
    • Raises and Promotions
    • Raises and promotions are a direct result of how well you do your job. Once you have accepted a job offer and started to work:
      • Meet regularly with your supervisor
      • Ask for feedback on your performance and any suggestions for improvement
      • Let your supervisor know that you are interested in increased responsibility
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 50.
    • Measuring Employee Benefits
    • You should also evaluate the types of benefits the company offers besides a paycheck and pay particular attention to:
      • Health care
      • Retirement benefits
      • The specific needs of your family
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 51.
    • Meeting Employee Needs
    • Changes in society have brought about changes in the types of benefits that employees receive. Some of these changes include:
      • Cafeteria-style employee benefits
      • Social Security benefits
      • Pension plans
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development cafeteria-style employee benefits programs that allow workers to choose the benefits that best meet their personal needs pension plan a retirement plan that is funded at least in part by an employer
  • 52.
    • Comparing Benefits
    • You can compare the dollar value of employee benefits in several ways. These ways include finding:
      • The market value
      • Whether the benefits are tax-exempt or tax-deferred
    • A 401(k) plan is an example of a tax-deferred benefit.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 53.
    • Your Rights as an Employee
    • As an employee, you have certain legal rights; you also have certain legal rights during the hiring process:
      • An employer cannot refuse to hire a woman or terminate her employment because she is pregnant.
      • An employer cannot discriminate against a person for any reason related to age, race, color, religion, gender, marital status, national origin, or any mental or physical disabilities.
      • An employer must pay for unemployment insurance, contribute to Social Security, and provide for workers’ compensation funds in case of a work-related injury or illness.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 54.
    • Long-Term Career Development
    • A job is for today, but a career can last a lifetime. As you enter the world of work, ask yourself:
      • Will you always enjoy the work that you do today?
      • Will you be successful in the career you select?
    • You cannot predict the future, but you can develop skills and attitudes that will increase your chances of being satisfied with your work in years to come.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 55.
    • Guidelines for Career Success
    • Here are some basic guidelines to follow for career success:
      • Make a point of improving your communication skills—both written and oral.
      • Do your best to get along with your coworkers.
      • Remain flexible and open to new ideas.
      • Develop good work habits.
      • Be creative in solving your own problems.
      • Be willing to learn new techniques and technologies.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 56.
    • Training Opportunities
    • A key to your ongoing success will be your ability to keep up with changes in technology and to adapt to the global economy.
    • Take advantage of your company’s:
      • Regular training programs
      • Professional seminars
      • Help with payment for college courses
    • You should also continue to read and learn as much as you can on your own.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 57.
    • Career Paths and Advancement
    • As time goes by, you will experience changes in your personal interests, values, and goals.
    • Outside factors, such as economic conditions and social trends, will also influence:
      • Your career choices
      • Other financial decisions that you make
    • You will probably go through a series of career stages and experience specific tasks and concerns with each one.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 58.
    • Mentors
    • One way to make sure that your career develops in the right direction is to gain support from a mentor.
    • A mentor can:
      • Give you one-on-one training
      • Help you to meet other knowledgeable people
      • Provide you with emotional support during difficult times at work
    • Some of the best mentors are retired people who are eager to share a lifetime of knowledge and experience.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill mentor an experienced employee who serves as a teacher and counselor for a less-experienced person Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 59.
    • Changing Careers
    • Most workers change jobs several times over the course of their lives. The following are some signs that it may be time to move on:
      • You feel bored or depressed at work.
      • Your job adversely affects you physically or emotionally.
      • You receive a series of poor performance evaluations.
      • You have little opportunity to obtain a raise or promotion.
      • You have a poor relationship with your supervisor or coworkers.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 60.
    • The Time Between Jobs
    • Being out of work can cause emotional and financial stress. While you are looking for a job:
      • Continue to eat, sleep, and exercise as usual.
      • Stay involved in family and community activities.
      • Improve your skills through personal study, classes, or volunteer work.
      • Think about opportunities with nonprofit or government organizations.
    • Whether looking for a new job or your first job, always consider how the financial and personal costs and benefits of your career choice will affect your needs and goals.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Section 2.2 Employment and Career Development
  • 61.
    • Key Term Review
    • job
    • career
    • standard of living
    • trends
    • potential earning power
    • aptitudes
    • interest inventories
    • demographic trends
    • geographic trends
    • service industries
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
    • internship
    • cooperative education
    • networking
    • informational interview
    • r é sum é
    • cover letter
    • interview
    • cafeteria-style employee benefits
    • pension plan
    • mentor
  • 62.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • List some of the personal issues you will need to consider when planning your career.
    • Personal issues to consider when choosing a career include your:
      • Aptitudes
      • Interests
      • Personality
      • Current financial situation
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
  • 63.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • Describe factors that affect your potential earning power.
    • Your potential earning power will be influenced by:
      • Your level of education and training
      • The field of study you select
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
  • 64.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • Explain how current demographic trends might influence your choice of career.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
    • Demographic trends can affect your employment opportunities
    • Some examples of demographic trends that have affected the job
    • market are:
    • More working parents
    • More leisure time
    • More elderly people in the overall population
    • Greater demand for ongoing employment training
  • 65.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • List some ways you might obtain job-related experience.
    • You can gain experience through:
      • Part-time work
      • Volunteer work
      • Internships
      • Cooperative education
      • Class projects
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
  • 66.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • Identify sources of information to find out more about the career in which you are interested.
    • To evaluate career opportunities, use sources such as:
      • The Internet
      • Libraries
      • Newspapers
      • School guidance offices
      • Community organizations
      • Networking with people working in the field you choose
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning
  • 67.
    • Reviewing Key Concepts
    • Explain your rights as an employee.
      • An employer cannot refuse to hire a woman or terminate her employment because she is pregnant.
      • An employer cannot discriminate against a person for any reason related to age, race, color, religion, gender, marital status, national origin, or any mental or physical disabilities.
      • An employer must pay for unemployment insurance, contribute to Social Security, and provide for workers’ compensation funds in case of a work-related injury or illness.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill Chapter 2 Finances and Career Planning As an employee, you have certain legal rights; you also have certain legal rights during the hiring process:
  • 68.
    • Newsclip: Career Edge
    • Students who develop strong job-search skills have a career advantage. They develop clear career direction. They also communicate and promote their competitive edge to employers.
    • Log On Go to finance07.glencoe.com and open Chapter 2. Learn more about career strategies. Write a paragraph about how you can boost your chances of getting hired.
    Business and Personal Finance Unit 1 Chapter 2 © 2007 Glencoe/McGraw-Hill