The Art of Compassion

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This presentations highlights a number of social justice programs in which students can participate through art.

This presentations highlights a number of social justice programs in which students can participate through art.

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  • SchoolArts, Aug/Sept 2010
  • Website by Ann Ayers and Ellen McMillan, two high school art teachers in Florida.
  • The Memory Project is a unique initiative in which art students create portraits (drawings, paintings, digital art, etc) for children and teens around the world who have been orphaned, abandoned, neglected, or otherwise disadvantaged. To do this, the artists receive pictures of children who are waiting for portraits. The artists then create the portraits, and the Memory Project coordinates the delivery of the portraits to the children. The goal of the project is to inspire caring and a positive sense of self.
  • SchoolArts Magazine, November 2010The project was developed by Ben Schumaker as a graduate student at the University of Wisconsin. In 2003, while volunteering in Guatemala, Ben encountered a man who had grown up in an orphanage. This man explained that he did not have any personal belongings from his youth. He suggested that Ben help the kids collect special items that would contribute to their sense of identity and self-worth. From this, Ben envisioned that having portraits made by art students would be a way to connect American youth with kids from other countries in a meaningful exchange of caring. The Memory Project was officially born in the fall of 2004.
  • El Salvador
  • India, Egypt
  • SierraLeonne
  • The first Pinwheels for Peace were installed on Sept. 21, 2005. Since then, we have grown from 500,000 pinwheels planted the first year, to three million pinwheels in 2009! The project was started by two high school teachers, Ann Ayers and Ellen McMillan.
  • Samantha Melvin, Richey Elementary School, Burnet, Texas
  • Nancy Walkup, Ryan Elementary School, Denton, Texas.
  • Sticking pinwheels into painted cardboard forms makes them more portable.
  • Peace dove made by students at the Eldorado School in Santa Fe, New Mexico for International Peace Day; teacher Roni Rohr.
  • Also created by Ann Ayers and Ellen McMillan
  • Many student organizations made and sold pins to benefit Haiti. Photos from Joy Schultz.
  • Photo from Joy Schultz.
  • This was started by Samantha Melvin, Laurie Berg, and Fred Sorrells in Burnet, Texas, to provide art supplies and crutches for disabled artists in Haiti. After the earthquake, the project became even more crucial.
  • Ryan Elementary School, Denton, Texas
  • Laurie Berg, Samantha Melvin, and Nancy Walkup, collecting crutches in Burnet, Texas.
  • The Wish Tree Project was inspired by Yoko Ono.
  • In Japan, people leave paper “prayers” at shrines.
  • In Japan, you can find paper prayers in many places. This tree was at a saki factory.
  • Aug/Sept 2010 SchoolArts article by Sarah Dewitt Brooks, Oakton Elementary School, Oakton, Virginia.
  • Sarah Dewitt Brooks, Oakton Elementary School, Oakton, Virginia
  • Sarah Dewitt Brooks, Oakton Elementary School, Oakton, Virginia
  • Beth Burkhauser is a force behind the Hexagon Project. The hexagon is a visual metaphor for interdependence, with its potential to infinitely link together. The fourth annual exhibit of hexagons will be displayed in Scranton, Pennsylvania in 2011.
  • SchoolArts article by Beth Burkhauser and Dave Porter, Keystone College, LaPlume, Pennsylvania.
  • Hexagons by students in Haiti and in the United States.
  • Ryan Elementary School, Denton, Texas
  • Help make safe the lead-contaminated soil in U.S. cities that puts thousands of children at risk for severe learning disabilities and behavioral problems. New Orleans is one of the most lead-contaminated cities in the U.S.–this is where the solution starts. Draw your Fundred today! …and send to a Collection Center near you to be counted!
  • Suggestions are included to help students make choices in decorating their bills.
  • Fundred was started by contemporary artist Mel Chin.
  • In an effort to remember them, Holocaust Museum Houston is collecting 1.5 million handmade butterflies. The butterflies will eventually comprise a breath-taking exhibition, currently scheduled for Spring 2013, for all to remember.
  • Envisioning everyone in the world carrying colorful canopies whenever life's storms threaten, Hilda encourages school-age children to paint in small groups on over-sized white-nylon umbrellas with non-toxic fabric markers. With these tools, healthy, ill, and challenged children share their artistic images with each other and the world.
  • The Bread Art Project was created by the Grain Foods Foundation to help increase awareness of the growing hunger problem in the United States.
  • One Million Bones is a fundraising art installation designed to recognize the millions of victims and survivors who have been killed or displaced by ongoing genocide. This was started by Naomi Natale.
  • People of all ages can contribute bones.
  • The Cradle Project was a fundraising art installation designed to represent the plight of the estimated 48 million children who have been orphaned by disease and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa. This was also started by Naomi Natale.
  • Join other art educators at Art Education 2.0 to keep up-to-date on projects in which your students can participate.

Transcript

  • 1. The Art of Compassion
  • 2. Powerful Projects
  • 3. The Memory Project
  • 4.
  • 5.
  • 6.
  • 7.
  • 8. Pinwheels for Peace
  • 9.
  • 10.
  • 11.
  • 12.
  • 13. Haiti Houses
  • 14.
  • 15.
  • 16.
  • 17. The Global Crutch Initiative
  • 18.
  • 19.
  • 20.
  • 21.
  • 22. The Wish Tree Project
  • 23.
  • 24.
  • 25.
  • 26.
  • 27.
  • 28.
  • 29.
  • 30. The Hexagon Project
  • 31.
  • 32.
  • 33. Fundred by Mel Chin
  • 34.
  • 35.
  • 36.
  • 37. The Butterfly Project
  • 38. The Umbrella Project
  • 39.
  • 40. The Bread Art Project
  • 41. Empty Bowls
  • 42.
  • 43.
  • 44. One Million Bones
  • 45. One Million Bones
  • 46.
  • 47.
  • 48. The Cradle Project
  • 49. Art Education 2.0
  • 50. Web Links
    The Butterfly Project, http://www.hmh.org/ed_butterfly1.shtml
    Empty Bowls, http://www.emptybowls.net/
    The Umbrella Project, http://www.umbrellaproject.org/
    Haiti Houses, http://www.haitihouses.org/
    The Bread Art Project, http://www.breadartproject.com/#/home
    Wish Tags, http://www.imaginepeace.com/wish
    100 People: A World Portrait, http://www.100people.org/
    The Memory Project, http://www.thememoryproject.org/
    Pinwheels for Peace, http://www.pinwheelsforpeace.com/pinwheelsforpeace/home.html
    Fundred, http://www.fundred.org/
    The Global Art Initiative, http://www.globalartinitiative.org/
    One Million Bones, http://www.onemillionbones.org/
    The Cradle Project, http://www.thecradleproject.org/
    The Hexagon Project, http://www.idayscranton.org/hexagon.html
    Art Education 2.0, http://arted20.ning.com/