Her story and contributions to:• Wichita Falls• Op Art and the 60s• Munsell System• Pixilated Portraits Inspire
 Lived and worked in Wichita Falls her entire life Her brother Leslie Turner was a national syndicated cartoonist Trave...
VICTOR VASARELY---OPTICAL EFFECTS OF LINE AND COLOR
SIMPLE LINE CHANGESCAN CREATE ILLUSIONSALFORD’S FOCUS WASCOLORElisabeth Alford ( private collection) Elisabeth Alford
Stare here for 30 seconds Then stare here for after image
Blue Bonnets Elisabeth Alford
 SWorking with Hue, Value andChroma in a 3-D model inorder to Standardize ColorsScience and Industry have adoptedthe Muns...
 Alford became interested ina pixilated, low resolutionimages in 1965 when she sawan artist’s early computerprogram which...
 “. . . I photographed flowers atnurseries, bought fruit andvegetables and brought themhome and photographed themalso. I...
 “I had a six shelf high bookcasefull of bottles of mixed colorswith the lightest value colors atthe top, value 9, and do...
 When she could nolonger paint, shemade smallerweavings, macrameand small jewelry- likepieces. She died when shewas 89 y...
Pixilated Portraits and Elisabeth Alford
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Pixilated Portraits and Elisabeth Alford

231

Published on

Presentation by Liz Langdon

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
231
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Alford said that she particularly enjoyed art that involved the viewer in a long-lasting relationship. Art that continually reveals new visual impression
  • Pixilated Portraits and Elisabeth Alford

    1. 1. Her story and contributions to:• Wichita Falls• Op Art and the 60s• Munsell System• Pixilated Portraits Inspire
    2. 2.  Lived and worked in Wichita Falls her entire life Her brother Leslie Turner was a national syndicated cartoonist Traveled often and as far away as Egypt Taught at Ben Franklin Elementary and Hirschi High Later she taught weaving and painting at Midwestern State Her painting style was influenced by the Op Art movement Her paintings and weavings were exhibited and collected inDallas, Austin and Washington D.C. as well as locally and in west Texas Her 3 Dimensional Form of 558 precise colors is on permanent displayat the Optical Society of America in Washington D.C.
    3. 3. VICTOR VASARELY---OPTICAL EFFECTS OF LINE AND COLOR
    4. 4. SIMPLE LINE CHANGESCAN CREATE ILLUSIONSALFORD’S FOCUS WASCOLORElisabeth Alford ( private collection) Elisabeth Alford
    5. 5. Stare here for 30 seconds Then stare here for after image
    6. 6. Blue Bonnets Elisabeth Alford
    7. 7.  SWorking with Hue, Value andChroma in a 3-D model inorder to Standardize ColorsScience and Industry have adoptedthe Munsell system to identify color inan exacting and standardized way.
    8. 8.  Alford became interested ina pixilated, low resolutionimages in 1965 when she sawan artist’s early computerprogram which broke aphotograph portrait downinto a grid of 24X24 squaresof flat color, that remainsrecognizable. “I decided that if he could doit with photography I coulddo it in paintings. . .
    9. 9.  “. . . I photographed flowers atnurseries, bought fruit andvegetables and brought themhome and photographed themalso. I enlarged the photos and brokethe surfaces up into geometricshapes— sometimessquares, circles, or othergeometric shapes. Then I would analyze eachshape as to what flat color itshould be painted in order toachieve my goal. I used theMunsell Color System to matchthe colors. The next job was tomix up all those little jars ofpaint.. . .Elisabeth Alford, collection of the Kemp Art Center
    10. 10.  “I had a six shelf high bookcasefull of bottles of mixed colorswith the lightest value colors atthe top, value 9, and down tothe darkest value colors at thebottom.” “It was time-consuming, but alabor of love as I began to seethe images emerging. Theresulting paintings were worththe effort to me personally andwere quite successful with thepublic, thankfully.” “I wanted viewers to becomeinvolved in the seeing processand hoped that they wouldcontinue to notice differentaspects of the painting as timepassed.”Elisabeth Alford (Detail)
    11. 11.  When she could nolonger paint, shemade smallerweavings, macrameand small jewelry- likepieces. She died when shewas 89 years old.
    1. A particular slide catching your eye?

      Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

    ×