Using Art TEKS with
Quilting Wichita Falls Together
Marion Coleman
Story Quilts
(a) TEKS Fine Arts Introduction.
(1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre,
and the visual arts to ...
(2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception,
creative expression, historical and cultural relevance, a...
(b) Knowledge and skills.
(1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops
and expands visual literacy sk...
1(A) gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses; and
1(B) identify the elements of art, includin...
(2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas
through original artworks using a variety of media with
appropriat...
(3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an
understanding of art history and culture by analyzing a...
3(A). Identify simple subjects expressed in artworks.
3(B) Develop awareness and sensitivity to differing experiences and opinions through
artwork. Students must support choice...
3(B) The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures.
Marion Co...
3)C) Identify the uses of art in everyday life.
3(D). Relate visual art
concepts to other
disciplines (such as
science).
3(D) Relate visual art concepts to other disciplines such as math.
Math concepts of
measurement, geometry,
scale, and prop...
(4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to
and analyzes artworks of self and others, contributing to th...
4(A) Express ideas about personal artworks or portfolios.
The student artist’s statement about
an artwork (his or her own,...
4(B) Express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries,
portfolios, or exhibitions.
4(C) Compile collections of artwork such as physical artwork, electronic images, sketchbooks, or
portfolios for the purpos...
Post portfolios
of student work
on your school
web pages.
For this presentation and more go to
http://www.slideshare.net/nwalkup/
Art TEKS for Quilting Wichita Falls Together
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Art TEKS for Quilting Wichita Falls Together

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  • The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for Art take effect in the school year of 2014-2015. This overview will provide meaningful ways to incorporate them into artistic content, focusing on the Quilting Wichita Falls Together Project that features artist Marion Coleman at the Wichita Falls Museum of Art.
  • Quilting Wichita Falls Together was developed from Pride in Place, an art curriculum developed for the Wichita Falls Museum of Art, and features the artist Marion Coleman, a native of Wichita Falls, Texas.
  • This introduction was a major addition to the Fine Arts TEKS in revision. The red here highlights 21st century skills needed for our students to be successful in our quickly changing world.
  • The four basic strands of the new TEKS are (1) observation and perception, (2) creative expression, (3) historical and cultural relevance, (4) and critical evaluation and response.
  • The elements and principles of art have been combined in one objective.
  • The use of the elements and principles of design can be a starting point into an artwork but the investigation should not end there.
  • Students are expected to work with a variety of media.
  • The development of respect for others is at the heart of this objectives.
  • Clearly, this shows a boy with a skateboard.
  • Students must support their choices with reasoning and respect other’s choices.
  • Marion Coleman uses historical/cultural themes in her quilts. Here is a quilt honoring Ruby Bridges, the first black child to attend an all white elementary school in the south.
  • Marion Coleman at her sewing machine in her studio.
  • A garden is the subject of this artwork. How could you relate this to science? Cycles of life, metamorphosis, and the seasons come to mind. Also collaboration.
  • Math concepts of measurement, geometry, scale, and proportion all play a part in the success of this quilt.
  • This reflects significant changes from the previous TEKS. All students should show evidence of these objectives. Virtual online field trips and online portfolios can help with experiences with these objectives.
  • This portrait of Faith Ringgold by Marion Coleman was featured in Oprah Magazine. Faith Ringgold is also a quilt artist, famous for the book Tar Beach, and for many other books and quilts.
  • 4(B) Express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions.
  • Use Artsonia to create and share student portfolios and raise money for the artroom.
  • You can create galleries as well as individual portfolios on Artsonia.
  • Post portfolios of student work on your school web pages.
  • Art TEKS for Quilting Wichita Falls Together

    1. 1. Using Art TEKS with Quilting Wichita Falls Together
    2. 2. Marion Coleman Story Quilts
    3. 3. (a) TEKS Fine Arts Introduction. (1) The fine arts incorporate the study of dance, music, theatre, and the visual arts to offer unique experiences and empower students to explore realities, relationships, and ideas. These disciplines engage and motivate all students through active learning, critical thinking, and innovative problem solving. The fine arts develop cognitive functioning and increase student academic achievement, higher-order thinking, communication, and collaboration skills, making the fine arts applicable to college readiness, career opportunities, workplace environments, social skills, and everyday life. Students develop aesthetic and cultural awareness through exploration, leading to creative expression. Creativity, encouraged through the study of the fine arts, is essential to nurture and develop the whole child.
    4. 4. (2) Four basic strands--foundations: observation and perception, creative expression, historical and cultural relevance, and critical evaluation and response--provide broad, unifying structures for organizing the knowledge and skills students are expected to acquire. Each strand is of equal value and may be presented in any order throughout the year. Students rely on personal observations and perceptions, which are developed through increasing visual literacy and sensitivity to surroundings, communities, memories, imaginings, and life experiences, as sources for thinking about, planning, and creating original artworks. Students communicate their thoughts and ideas with innovation and creativity. Through art, students challenge their imaginations, foster critical thinking, collaborate with others, and build reflective skills. While exercising meaningful problem-solving skills, students develop the lifelong ability to make informed judgments.
    5. 5. (b) Knowledge and skills. (1) Foundations: observation and perception. The student develops and expands visual literacy skills using critical thinking, imagination, and the senses to observe and explore the world by learning about, understanding, and applying the elements of art, principles of design, and expressive qualities. The student uses what the student sees, knows, and has experienced as sources for examining, understanding, and creating artworks. The student is expected to: (A)gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses; and (B)identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including repetition/pattern and balance, in the environment.
    6. 6. 1(A) gather information from subjects in the environment using the senses; and 1(B) identify the elements of art, including line, shape, color, texture, and form, and the principles of design, including repetition/pattern and balance, in the environment. Marion Coleman’s Grandmother and Aunt How are the elements and principles of design used in this quilt?.
    7. 7. (2) Creative expression. The student communicates ideas through original artworks using a variety of media with appropriate skills. The student expresses thoughts and ideas creatively while challenging the imagination, fostering reflective thinking, and developing disciplined effort and progressive problem-solving skills. The student is expected to: (A) create artworks using a variety of lines, shapes, colors, textures, and forms; (B) arrange components intuitively to create artworks; and (C) use a variety of materials to develop manipulative skills while engaging in opportunities for exploration through drawing, painting, printmaking, constructing artworks, and sculpting, including modeled forms.
    8. 8. (3) Historical and cultural relevance. The student demonstrates an understanding of art history and culture by analyzing artistic styles, historical periods, and a variety of cultures. The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. The student is expected to: (A) identify simple subjects expressed in artworks; (B) share ideas about personal experiences such as family and friends and develop awareness and sensitivity to differing experiences and opinions through artwork; (C) identify the uses of art in everyday life; and (D) relate visual art concepts to other disciplines.
    9. 9. 3(A). Identify simple subjects expressed in artworks.
    10. 10. 3(B) Develop awareness and sensitivity to differing experiences and opinions through artwork. Students must support choices with reasoning and respect other’s choices. This quilt is titled Waiting for the Freedom Train. Can you see the eyes in the background? What could those mean? What are the reasons for your Interpretation?
    11. 11. 3(B) The student develops global awareness and respect for the traditions and contributions of diverse cultures. Marion Coleman often uses historical/cultural themes in her quilts. Here is a quilt honoring Ruby Bridges, the first black child to attend an all white elementary school in the south.
    12. 12. 3)C) Identify the uses of art in everyday life.
    13. 13. 3(D). Relate visual art concepts to other disciplines (such as science).
    14. 14. 3(D) Relate visual art concepts to other disciplines such as math. Math concepts of measurement, geometry, scale, and proportion all play a part in the success of this quilt.
    15. 15. (4) Critical evaluation and response. The student responds to and analyzes artworks of self and others, contributing to the development of lifelong skills of making informed judgments and reasoned evaluations. The student is expected to: (A) express ideas about personal artworks or portfolios. (B) express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions using original artworks created by artists or peers; and (C) compile collections of artwork such as physical artwork, electronic images, sketchbooks, or portfolios for the purposes of self-evaluations or exhibitions.
    16. 16. 4(A) Express ideas about personal artworks or portfolios. The student artist’s statement about an artwork (his or her own, or about an artist’s), may be between 1-3 sentences and may describe the process of creating the work, why the artist chose the title, or how the piece relates to the theme. If the student cannot write a statement, the teacher may write it or document it through sound recording or photography. A portrait of artist Faith Ringgold
    17. 17. 4(B) Express ideas found in collections such as real or virtual art museums, galleries, portfolios, or exhibitions.
    18. 18. 4(C) Compile collections of artwork such as physical artwork, electronic images, sketchbooks, or portfolios for the purposes of self-evaluations or exhibitions.
    19. 19. Post portfolios of student work on your school web pages.
    20. 20. For this presentation and more go to http://www.slideshare.net/nwalkup/

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