Pronoun
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A descriptive study about pronouns

A descriptive study about pronouns

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Pronoun Presentation Transcript

  • 1. ELT Teaching Pronouns Session By Dr. Nicholas CorreaDirector, New Horizon scholars School
  • 2. Pronoun
  • 3. Pronoun is a word used instead of anoun.Pronouns are small words that takethe place of a noun.Example:he, you, ours, themselves, some, each, etc
  • 4. Pronouns are the no-nameworkhorses, jumping in forthe superstar nouns whenthey get exhausted.Pronouns are the stuntdoubles of the Englishlanguage. They keepcommunication going with orwithout the nouns.Pronouns come in to keepnouns from getting repetitiveor when nouns are notclearly known. They do morework than we think.
  • 5. Example:•Yogesh is a studious boy.Yogesh loves to read books.We can write as•Yogesh is a studies boy. Heloves to read books.
  • 6. Types of pronouns:The pronouns cane be classified into 8 types. They are-•Personal PronounsI, me, you, he, him, she...•Demonstrative Pronounsthis, that, these, those•Possessive Pronounsmine, yours, his...•Interrogative Pronounswho, what, which...•Reflexive Pronouns/Intensive Pronounsmyself, yourself, himself...•Reciprocal Pronounseach other, one another•Indefinite Pronounsanother, much, nobody, few, such...•Relative Pronounswho, whom, which...
  • 7. Personal PronounsPersonal pronouns represent specificpeople or things.We use them depending on:•number: singular (eg: I) or plural (eg: we)•person: 1st person (eg: I), 2nd person(eg: you) or 3rd person (eg: he)•gender: male (eg: he), female (eg: she)or neuter (eg: it)•case: subject (eg: we) or object (eg: us)
  • 8. We use personal pronouns in place of a personor people or things that we are talking about.All the personal pronouns are divided intothree persons, they are-First personMy name is Mary but when I am talking aboutmyself I almost always use "I" or "me", not“Mary". This is first person.Second personWhen I am talking to someone directly , Ialways use "you", not your name. This issecond person.Third personWhen I am talking about another person orthing I may start with the name but then use"he" or “she” “it” or “they”. And so on.
  • 9. List of personal pronouns: personal pronounsnumber person gender subject object 1st male/female I me 2nd male/female you yousingular male he him 3rd female she her neuter it it 1st male/female we us 2nd male/female you youplural male/female/n 3rd they them euter
  • 10. Examples of pronouns:Subject pronoun Object pronounI like coffee. John helped me.Do you like coffee? John loves you.He runs fast. Did Ram beat him?She is clever. Does Mary know her?It doesnt work. Can the engineer repair it?We went home. Anthony drove us.Do you need a table for three? Did John and Mary beat you at doubles?They played doubles John and Mary beat them.
  • 11. When we are talking about a single thing, we almost alwaysuse it. However, there are a few exceptions.We may sometimes refer to an animal as he/him or she/her,especially if the animal is domesticated or a pet. Ships (andsome other vessels or vehicles) as well as some countries areoften treated as female and referred to as she/her.Examples:•This is our dog Tomy. He eats only bones.•The Titanic was a great ship but she sank on her first voyage.•My cycle is Claud. I loved her like my younger sister.•Nepal has now closed her border with India.
  • 12. For a single person, sometimes we dont know whetherto use he or she. There are several solutions to this:•If a teacher needs help, he or she should see theprincipal.•If a teacher needs help, he should see the principal.We often use it to introduce a remark:•It is nice to have a holiday sometimes.•It is important to dress well.•Its difficult to find a job.•Is it normal to see them together?•It didnt take long to walk here.
  • 13. We also often use it to talk about theweather, temperature, time and distance.•Its raining.•It will probably be hot tomorrow.•Is it nine oclock yet?•Its 50 kilometres from here to Cambridge.
  • 14. Demonstrative Pronounsdemonstrate (verb): It means to show;to indicate; to point etc.A demonstrative pronoun represents athing or things:•near in distance or time (this, these)•far in distance or time (that, those) near far singular this that plural these those
  • 15. Examples demonstrative pronouns:•This tastes good.•Have you seen this?•These are bad times.•Do you like these?•That is beautiful.•Look at that!•Those were the days!•Can you see those?•This is heavier than that.•These are bigger than those.
  • 16. Difference between demonstrative pronoun and adjective:Do not confuse demonstrative pronouns with demonstrativeadjectives. They are identical, but a demonstrative pronounstands alone, while a demonstrative adjective qualifies a noun.•That smells. (demonstrative pronoun)•That book is good. (demonstrative adjective + noun)Normally we use demonstrative pronouns for things only. Butwe can use them for people when the person is identified.Look at these examples:•This is John speaking. Is that Mary?•That sounds like James.
  • 17. Possessive PronounsPossessive pronouns are used to refer to a specific person/peopleor thing/things (the "antecedent") belonging to a person/people(and sometimes belonging to an animal/animals or thing/things).Possessive pronouns are used depending on:•number: singular- mine plural- ours•person: 1st person- mine , 2nd person- yours 3rd person- his,her, plural- their•gender: male –his female- hers plural- theirs
  • 18. Examples of possessive pronouns possessive number person gender (of "owner") pronouns 1st male/female mine 2nd male/female yours singular male his 3rd female hers 1st male/female ours 2nd male/female yours plural 3rd male/female/neuter theirs
  • 19. Examples:•We have drawn these pictures. Mine is in the centre. (subject = My picture)•I like your story. Do you like mine? (object = my story)•I looked everywhere for your book. I found Johns book but I couldnt findyours. (object = your book)•My experiments are good. Yours are wonderful. (subject = Yourexperiments)•All the poems were good but his was the best. (subject = his poem)•John found his keys but Mary couldnt find hers. (object = her keys)•James found his pen but Mary couldnt find hers. (object = her pen)•Here is your bike. Ours is over there, where we left it. (subject = Our bike)•Your photos are good. Ours are terrible. (subject = Our photos)•Each couples books are colour-coded. Yours are red. (subject = Your books)•I dont like this familys garden but I like yours. (subject = your garden)•These arent John and Marys children. Theirs have black hair. (subject =Their children)•John and Mary dont like your car. Do you like theirs? (object = their car)
  • 20. Interrogative PronounsInterrogative pronouns are used to ask questions. The interrogative pronounrepresents the thing that we dont know .There are four main interrogative pronouns: they are question words - who,whom, what, which and the possessive pronoun whose subject object person who whom thing what person/thing which person whose (possessive)
  • 21. Notice that whom is the correct form when the pronoun is theobject of the verb, as in "Whom did you see?" ("I saw John.")However, in normal, spoken English we rarely use whom.Most native speakers would say (or even write): "Who did you see?"Look at these example questions. In the sample answers, the nounphrase that the interrogative pronoun represents is shown in bold. question answer Who told you? John told me. subject Whom did you I told Mary. object tell?
  • 22. An accidentsWhats happened? subject happened.What do you want? I want coffee. object The Porsche 911 cameWhich came first? subject first.Which will the doctor The doctor will see the objectsee first? patient in blue first.Theres one car missing. Johns (car) hasnt subjectWhose hasnt arrived? arrived.Weve found everyoneskeys. Whose did you I found Johns (keys). objectfind?
  • 23. Reflexive Pronouns/Intensive Pronounsreflexive (adj.) [grammar]: reflecting back on the subject, like amirrorWe use a reflexive pronoun when we want to refer back to thesubject of the sentence or clause. Reflexive pronouns end in "-self" (singular) or "-selves" (plural).There are eight reflexive pronouns: reflexive pronoun myself singular yourself himself, herself, itself ourselves plural yourselves themselves
  • 24. Examples: reflexive pronounsthe underlined words are NOT the the underlined words are the SAMEsame person/thing person/thingJohn saw me. I saw myself in the mirror.Why does he blame you? Why do you blame yourself?David sent him a copy. John sent himself a copy.David sent her a copy. Mary sent herself a copy.My dog hurt the cat. My dog hurt itself.We blame you. We blame ourselves.Can you help my children? Can you help yourselves?They cannot look after the babies. They cannot look after themselves.
  • 25. Intensive pronounsNotice that all the above reflexive pronouns can also act asintensive pronouns, but the function and usage are different.An intensive pronoun emphasizes its antecedent. Look at theseexamples:•I made it myself. OR I myself made it.•Have you yourself seen it? OR Have you seen it yourself?•The President himself promised to stop the war.•She spoke to me herself. OR She herself spoke to me.•The exam itself wasnt difficult, but exam room was horrible.•Never mind. Well do it ourselves.•You yourselves asked us to do it.•They recommend this book even though they themselveshave never read it. OR They recommend this book even thoughthey have never read it themselves.
  • 26. Interrogative PronounsWe use interrogative pronouns to ask questions. The interrogativepronoun represents the thing that we dont know (what we are asking thequestion about).There are four main interrogative pronouns: who, whom, what, whichNotice that the possessive pronoun whose can also be an interrogativepronoun (an interrogative possessive pronoun). subject object person who whom thing what person/thing which person whose (possessive)
  • 27. Notice that whom is the correct form when the pronoun is theobject of the verb, as in "Whom did you see?" ("I saw John.")However, in normal, spoken English we rarely use whom. Mostnative speakers would say (or even write): "Who did you see?"Look at these example questions. In the sample answers, the nounphrase that the interrogative pronoun represents is shown in bold.Note that we sometimes use the suffix "-ever" to make compoundsfrom some of these pronouns (mainly whoever, whatever,whichever). When we add "-ever", we use it for emphasis, often toshow confusion or surprise. Look at these examples:•Whoever would want to do such a nasty thing?•Whatever did he say to make her cry like that?•Theyre all fantastic! Whichever will you choose?
  • 28. question answerWho told you? John told me. subjectWhom did you tell? I told Mary. objectWhats happened? An accidents happened. subjectWhat do you want? I want coffee. objectWhich came first? The Porsche 911 came first. subjectWhich will the doctor see The doctor will see the patient in blue objectfirst? first.Theres one car missing. Johns (car) hasnt arrived. subjectWhose hasnt arrived?Weve found everyones I found Johns (keys). objectkeys. Whose did you find?
  • 29. Reflexive Pronouns/Intensive pronouns:reflexive (adj.) [grammar]: reflecting back on thesubject, like a mirror .We use a reflexive pronoun when we want to referback to the subject of the sentence or clause.Reflexive pronouns end in "-self" (singular) or "-selves"(plural).There are eight reflexive pronouns:
  • 30. reflexive pronoun myselfsingular yourself himself, herself, itself ourselvesplural yourselves themselves
  • 31. Examples: reflexive pronouns The underlined words are NOT The underlined words are the SAME the same person/thing person/thing John saw me. I saw myself in the mirror. Why does he blame you? Why do you blame yourself? David sent him a copy. John sent himself a copy. David sent her a copy. Mary sent herself a copy. My dog hurt the cat. My dog hurt itself. We blame you. We blame ourselves. Can you help my children? Can you help yourselves? They cannot look after the babies. They cannot look after themselves.
  • 32. Intensive pronounsNotice that all the above reflexive pronouns can also act asintensive pronouns, but the function and usage are different.An intensive pronoun emphasizes its antecedent.Examples:•I made it myself. OR I myself made it.•Have you yourself seen it? OR Have you seen it yourself?•The President himself promised to stop the war.•She spoke to me herself. OR She herself spoke to me.•The exam itself wasnt difficult, but exam room was horrible.•Never mind. Well do it ourselves.•You yourselves asked us to do it.•They recommend this book even though they themselves havenever read it. OR They recommend this book even though theyhave never read it themselves.
  • 33. Reciprocal Pronounsreciprocal (adj.): given or done in return; [grammar] expressingmutual actionWe use reciprocal pronouns when each of two or more subjects isacting in the same way towards the other.For example, A is talking to B, and B is talking to A. So we say:•A and B are talking to each other.The action is "reciprocated". John talks to Mary and Mary talks toJohn. I give you a present and you give me a present. The dogbites the cat and the cat bites the dog.
  • 34. There are only two reciprocal pronouns, and they are both two words:•each other•one anotherWhen we use these reciprocal pronouns:•there must be two or more people, things or groups involved (so wecannot use reciprocal pronouns with I, you [singular], he/she/it), and•they must be doing the same thingLook at these examples:•John and Mary love each other.•Peter and David hate each other.•The ten prisoners were all blaming one another.•Both teams played hard against each other.•We gave each other gifts.•Why dont you believe each other?•They cant see each other.•The gangsters were fighting one another.•The boats were bumping against each other in the storm.
  • 35. You probably notice that each other is used inmore examples above than one another.Thats because in general we use each othermore often than one another, which sounds alittle formal.Also, some people say that we should use oneanother only for three or more people or things,but there is no real justification for this.
  • 36. Indefinite PronounsThats Not My Job!This is a story about four people named Everybody,Somebody, Anybody and Nobody.An indefinite pronoun does not refer to any specificperson, thing or amount. It is vague and "not definite".Some typical indefinite pronouns are:•all, another, any, anybody/anyone, anything, each,everybody/everyone, everything, few, many, nobody,none, one, several, some, somebody/someone
  • 37. Note that many indefinite pronouns also function as other parts ofspeech. Look at "another" in the following sentences:•He has one job in the day and another at night. (pronoun)•Id like another drink, please. (adjective)Most indefinite pronouns are either singular or plural. However, some ofthem can be singular in one context and plural in another. The mostcommon indefinite pronouns are listed below, with examples, assingular, plural or singular/plural.Notice that a singular pronoun takes a singular verb AND that anypersonal pronoun should also agree (in number and gender). Look atthese examples:•Each of the players has a doctor.•I met two girls. One has given me her phone number.Similarly, plural pronouns need plural agreement:•Many have expressed their views.
  • 38. pronoun meaning examplesingular an additional or different person That ice-cream was good. Can Ianother or thing have another? Can anyone answer thisanybody/anyone no matter what person question? The doctor needs to know if youanything no matter what thing have eaten anything in the last two hours. every one of two or more peopleeach Each has his own thoughts. or things, seen separately Do you want tea or coffee? / I one or the other of two people oreither dont mind. Either is good for things me.enough as much or as many as needed Enough is enough. We can start the meeting becauseeverybody/everyone all people everybody has arrived. They have no house oreverything all things possessions. They lost everything in the earthquake.
  • 39. pronoun meaning example singular "Less is more" (Mies van derless a smaller amount Rohe)little a small amount Little is known about his early life.much a large amount Much has happend since we met. not one and not the other of two I keep telling Jack and Jill butneither people or things neither believes me. I phoned many times but nobodynobody/no-one no person answered. If you dont know the answer itsnothing no single thing, not anything best to say nothing. Can one smoke here? | All theone an unidentified person students arrived but now one is missing. a different person or thing from one One was tall and the other wasother already mentioned short. Clearly somebody murdered him.somebody/someone an unspecified or unknown person It was not suicide. Listen! I just heard something!something an unspecified or unknown thing What could it be?you an unidentified person (informal) And you can see why.
  • 40. Plural two people or things, seen John likes coffee but notboth together tea. I think both are good. a small number of people Few have ever disobeyedfew or things him and lived. a reduced number of Fewer are smoking thesefewer people or things days. a large number of peoplemany Many have come already. or things Im sure that others haveothers other people; not us tried before us. more than two but not They all complained andseveral many several left the meeting. people in general They say that vegetablesthey (informal) are good for you.
  • 41. Singular or plural the whole quantity of something All is forgiven.all or of some things or people All have arrived. no matter how much or how Is any left?any many Are any coming? a greater quantity of something; There is more over there.more a greater number of people or More are coming. things Most is lost.most the majority; nearly all Most have refused. They fixed the water so why is none coming out of the tap?none not any; no person or persons I invited five friends but none have come.* an unspecified quantity of Here is some.some something; an unspecified Some have arrived. number of people or things He was a foreigner and he feltsuch of the type already mentioned that he was treated as such.
  • 42. •Some people say that "none" should always take a singularverb, even when talking about countable nouns (eg five friends).•They argue that "none" means "no one", and "one" is obviouslysingular. They say that "I invited five friends but none has come"is correct and "I invited five friends but none have come" isincorrect.•Historically and grammatically there is little to support this view."None" has been used for hundreds of years with both a singularand a plural verb, according to the context and the emphasisrequired.
  • 43. Relative PronounsA relative pronoun is a pronoun that introduces a relative clause. It iscalled a "relative" pronoun because it "relates" to the word that itmodifies.Example:•The person who phoned me last night is my teacher.In the above example, "who":•relates to "person", which it modifies•introduces the relative clause "who phoned me last night"There are five relative pronouns: who, whom, whose, which, that*Who (subject) and whom (object) are generally only for people. Whoseis for possession. Which is for things. That can be used for people** andthings and as subject and object in defining relative clauses (clauses thatare essential to the sentence and do not simply add extra information).Relative pronouns can refer to singular or plural, and there is nodifference between male and female.
  • 44. Examples showing defining and non-defining relative clauses: Example sentences notes S=subject, O=object, P=possessive - The person who phoned me last night is my teacher. That is preferable - The person that phoned me last night is my S teacher. - The car which hit me was yellow. That is preferable - The cars that hit me were yellow. - The person whom I phoned last night is my teacher. - The people who I phoned last night are my Whom is correct but very formal. teachers. The relative pronoun is optional. O - The person that I phoned last night is my teacher. defining - The person I phoned last night is my teacher. - The car which I drive is old. That is preferable to which. The - The car that I drive is old. relative pronoun is optional. - The car I drive is old. - The student whose phone just rang should stand up. - Students whose parents are wealthy pay extra. P - The police are looking for the car whose driver was masked. Of which is usual for things, but - The police are looking for the car of which the whose is sometimes possible driver was masked.
  • 45. - Mrs Pratt, who is very kind, is my teacher. S - The car, which was a taxi, exploded. - The cars, which were taxis, exploded. - Mrs Pratt, whom I like very much, is my teacher. Whom is correct but very - Mr and Mrs Pratt, who I like very much, are formal. Who is normal. O my teachers.non-defining - The car, which I was driving at the time, suddenly caught fire. - My brother, whose phone you just heard, is a doctor. - The car, whose driver jumped out just P before the accident, was completely Of which is usual for things, destroyed. but whose is sometimes - The car, the driver of which jumped out just possible before the accident, was completely destroyed.
  • 46. N.B:Not all grammar sources count"that" as a relative pronoun.Some people claim that we cannotuse "that" for people but must use"who/whom"; there is no goodreason for such a claim.