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Saying goodbye to a friend v4b

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This was the first essay I turned in for the semester in my English 100 class. There are numerous errors regarding citations - but there is ZERO plagiarism! I thought about cleaning it up and maybe …

This was the first essay I turned in for the semester in my English 100 class. There are numerous errors regarding citations - but there is ZERO plagiarism! I thought about cleaning it up and maybe some day I will, but I left it like this to show my progression throughout the semester.

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  • 1. Wischnewsky 1Louis WischnewskyEnglish 100MW @ 1:00 PM – 2:50 PMQuirkFebruary 16, 2011 Saying Goodbye to a Friend In the 1980s, G. I. Joe was the iconic toy for young boys. Oddly enough, “G. I. Joe” wasnot an actual character. Rather, “Joe” was the quintessential soldier that anyone that wanted to bea soldier against the evil that Cobra Command represented. In any case, it turns out he was not apassing trend of pop culture. Hes still around. Yet, listening to G. I. Joes cousins detractors, anytoy like Barbie will result in an adult population that never “grows up.” Hilary Tham writes about how she feels slighted by her former best friend in her poem,“Barbies Shoes.” Marilyn Ferris Motz, in her work, “Seen Through Rose-Tinted Glasses:TheBarbie Doll in American Society,” writes an even more damning view of the iconic doll thatblames Barbie for everything thats wrong – or perceived as wrong – with adult women. Maybe itcan be debated as to whether these two women ever grew up themselves and gracefully acceptedthat pretend does not translate into reality. However, the fact is that, overwhelmingly, mostwomen laugh when asked if they are disappointed they didnt grow up to be like Barbie. Afamiliar reply, in fact, may be along this line: “Are you serious? Barbie was a toy. You know:make believe.” The notion that Barbie causes a negative effect on society, and particularly women, is
  • 2. Wischnewsky 2quite a reach of the imagination. Barbie is not warping the minds of young ladies. Compare theidea to a child playing with her Barbie in the childs bedroom in, say, Louisiana. Barbie having anegative effect on women is like the child insisting Barbie really is in Paris to the point of atantrum. G. I. Joe can be seen as a destructive, even violent toy, but he certainly isnt causingboys to grow to be Marines. According to Harry Waters, in his analysis of the “original” TVdetractor Paddy Chayefskys research, even Chayefsky did not find a shred of evidence that thereis a link between violence on the tube correlating to an increase in real life crime. The critics dohave one thing right: some people have not yet grown up. G. I. Joe is a doll working much the same way Barbie does. When, through theirimagination, little boys become G. I. Joe, suddenly they have a direct relation to and their directinvolvement with tanks, guns and other weapons that could hardly be considered promotingworld peace. Yet, as grown men, not many of them are designing and building tanks or goingaround blowing up buildings in pursuit of the smallest Cobra evil. In fact, looking closer, itspretty obvious what grown men are not doing: they are not enlisting. Military enlistment has beenon a steady decline for decades now. All of this contradicts the claims that what children believeas a child with a toy, or doll in this instance, results in a warped adulthood. Waters, in his work, “Life According to TV,” admits the decades-old argument thatviolence on television results in a more violent populace is erroneous. Robert Kubey and MihalyCsikszentmihalyi (Csikszentmihalyi) delve deeper, considering whether the myth that violence invideo games increases crime. Their conclusion pointedly states the research does not support theclaim and, in fact, the exact opposite actually happens. Todays most popular video games are
  • 3. Wischnewsky 3played in the first person point of view. With these types of games, children and adults are goingmuch deeper into the adaption of the role of the character, or doll, they are playing with.Shouldnt this level of involvement with virtual reality result in a greater likelihood of aninability to differentiate fiction from reality? It would by the Barbie detractor standards. Yet, allthe research has concluded that this is not happening even at an only noticeable scale. Young men– and even young ladies – are immersing themselves into the roles of trained, professional killerswhile playing Halos Master Chief or Call of Dutys Ghost, but none are becoming internationalor galactic soldiers of fortune. With the almost unnoticed passage of age comes that day when little boys and little girlsrealize they have not opened their closets and taken out any of those G. I. Joe guys or Barbie galsin months. They feel guilty. Joe and Barbie were their friends and they were ALWAYS there forthose young men and women. Now, though, they are leaving those “friends” in the dark, coldconfines of an uncomfortable closet, stacked indiscriminately atop each other or under heaviertoys. It is then they realize it is time to say goodbye to a friend. Not long after comes the rite ofpassage when all of the toys are given away to younger siblings, nephews or nieces, or worse, tothe donation box. The detractors seem to regret that day. They become angry that they did not getenough time with Barbie and if they had, eh, maybe they could have been more like her. This isnot a reflection of Barbie being a negative impact on society. It is a reflection of an inability toaccept the fatality of life. Maybe instead of focusing on how much Barbie could have been “morerealistic,” the detractors could look back on those days with fond memories and enjoy the timethey did have with Barbie. Barbie was a friend that never once questioned a little girls motives.
  • 4. Wischnewsky 4Barbie just did whatever was imagined without hesitation. Even Tham and Motz would love tobe like that and, one has to wonder, who wouldnt? Barbie is not harmful to society. This can be seen from two different angles. Little boysare not growing up hunting down international terrorists on any grand scale. In fact, fewer andfewer are taking on militant careers. There has long been a debate about society confusing realitywith televised fiction. Yet, as people plunge themselves deeper and deeper into the fictionalwarrior role, more and more science is proving those same people easily to step back into reality.Finally, it isnt that Barbie was a cruel joke on some little girls psyche. Rather, instead of lovingthe time these young ladies had with their childhood friend, they are angry at her for not beingthere in adulthood. Saying Barbie is the cause of all the negative habits of adult women, thus, isas imaginative as believing a neighbors son is G. I. Joe at the forefront of the hunt for Osama binLaden. In that sense, the detractors are right: some people just havent grown up.
  • 5. Wischnewsky 5 Works CitedCsikszentmihalyi, Mihaly, Kubey, Robert. “Television Addiction is no Mere Metaphor.” Common Culture; Reading and Writing About American Popular Culture. Eds. Michael Petracca, Madaleine Sorapure. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. 147-154. Print.Motz, Marily Ferris. “ Seen through Rose-Tinted Glasses:”The Barbie Doll in American Society. Common Culture; Reading and Writing About American Popular Culture. Eds. Michael Petracca, Madeleine Sorapure. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. 15-20. Print.Tham, Hilary. “Barbies Shoes.” Common Culture; Reading and Writing About American Popular Culture. Eds. Michael Petracca, Madeleine Sorapure. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. 10. Print.Waters, Harry. “Life According to TV.” Common Culture; Reading and Writing About American Popular Culture. Eds. Michael Petracca, Madeleine Sorapure. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2010. 137. Print.

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