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BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT
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BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT

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This paper describes the status of local e-government in Indonesia using the United Nations e-government benchmarking model. Using data from the Indonesia Ministry of Internal Affairs, we examined …

This paper describes the status of local e-government in Indonesia using the United Nations e-government benchmarking model. Using data from the Indonesia Ministry of Internal Affairs, we examined 353 local government websites from early March to the end of May 2011. The results show that the majority of local government websites (193) are still at the emergence stage, 98 are at the enhanced stage, 61 are at the interactive stage, and only one local government website has achieved the transaction stage. None of the local e-government websites have moved to the final stage of e-government according to the UN model. Our findings also show that some local government websites are not well managed and maintained and that local government websites do not comply with central government standardization requirements outlined in the e-government blue print

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  • 1. BENCHMARKING INDONESIAN LOCAL E-GOVERNMENT Authors: Nurdin Nurdin Rosemary Stockdale Helana Scheepers Faculty of Information and Communication Technologies Swinburne University of TechnologyPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 2. DefinitionsE-Government: “a web-based information system which provides online services and an interaction channel” (Al- Haddad, Heyland, & Hubona, 2011, p. 1)Benchmarking: “a process whereby an organization evaluates its operations by comparison to similar organizations” (Mosse & Whitley, 2009, p. 155)Presented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 3. E-Government evaluation ModelPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 4. Evaluation Criteria Based on UN (2008) E-government Benchmarking ModelPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 5. Indonesian Government HierarchyBased on Regional Autonomy Law No. 32/2004- Provinces are functioned as the coordinator of regencies and cities level. Provinces do not have authority to mandate regencies and cities to adopt certain policiesPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 6. E-government in Indonesia 2000 - The central government enacted President Decree No. 50 in 2000 concerning Indonesia Telematic Coordination Team (TKTI) to coordinate the development of information and communication technology (ICT) in government and private sectors 2001- The central government issued President Instruction No. 6/2001 concerning Indonesia’s five-year National Information Communication and Technology Action Plan to encourage the use of ICT to empower citizens, increase their welfare, reduce poverty, and eliminate the digital divide. 2003 - the Indonesian government launched Presidential Instruction No. 9/2003 to establish an ICT Coordinating Team ( TKTI = Tim Koordinasi Telematika Indonesia) to coordinate and develop of ICT within government, business, and citizens as well as the use of ICT for better developmentPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 7. E-Government in Indonesia: continued 2003 – The central government launched Presidential Instruction No.3/2003 to officially adopt and implement of e-government within government institutions 2004 – Ministry of Information and Communication provides E-Government implementation Blue PrintPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 8. Methodology - We use data from Indonesia Ministry of Internal State affairs (Depdagri, 201) - There are 489 regencies and cities within 33 Indonesia provinces - data collection from early March to end of May 2011 - We use criteria in table 2 - A regency or city is classified into a stage if it has minimum 3 criteria out of fivePresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 9. Findings From the 489 local governments we examined we found that: - 424 local governments have websites of which 353 are accessible. - 74 websites were offline (it has a website but we couldn’t accessed - 62 local governments did not have websites at the time of data collectionPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 10. Findings: continued Emerging : 353 (55%) regencies and cities Enhance : 193 (28%) regencies and cities Interactive : 98 (17%) regencies and cities Transaction : 1 city (Denpasar) Connected : NilPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 11. Findings: continued Most local e-government is still at an emerging stage merely showing websites, and some websites are not managed and maintained according to e-government blue-prints (standardizations) (Depkominfo, 2004) Some local government websites are managed by different departments such as Regional Secretary Office (SEKDA), Department of Regional Development Planning (BAPEDA), and private companies instead managed by the local government Communication and Information department as required by the blue print. Different use of domain names, such as “org” and “com” instead of “go.id” (government formal website domain name). Lack of maintaining which includes: - out of date information such more than three months are not updated - , inaccuracyPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 12. Findings: continued Lack of maintaining which includes: - out of date information such more than three months are not updated - information in accuracy, such as website names, downloadable information is not availablePresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 13. DiscussionAfter almost a decade of Presidential Instruction No.3/2003concerning the National Policy and Strategy of e-governmentimplementation was launched, most local governments arestill at emerging stage which impacts:e-government might not able to provide significant benefitsfor both citizens and the local governmentin efficiency use of government budget because the e-government at emerging level might not compatible withfinancial value that has been invested.lack of standardization of e-government implementationacross regencies and cities.Presented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 14. ImplicationsThese findings can assist the Indonesiangovernment and policy makers to understand thecurrent state of local e-government in Indonesiaand take some actions such as:Redesign policies and strategies regarding e-government implementation within localgovernmentsestablish strong policies and regulations regardinge-government implementationForm a task force to monitor and evaluate the e-government implementationPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 15. Conclusions local e-government in Indonesia can only be grouped in four stages; Emerging, Transactional, Interactive, and Transactional, not five stages. the highest stage of local e-government development in Indonesia is transactional Most of Indonesia local e-government are emergingPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 16. Limitation & Future Research Since our study only use online data from local government websites, it is required to investigate e-government development using a more in depth evaluation within the government organizations. It is also required to understand why some local governments have yet to adopt functional websites despite policies and regulations to do so having been launched by the central governmentPresented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy
  • 17. Suggestions & Questions?Presented at PACISconference in Ho ChiMinh City Vietnam on 14July 2012 Swinburne University of Technolgy

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