Introduction
Main characters in scenario:
 Miss Jia (Teacher)
 John (accused of cheating in test and
smokes)
 Lian Huay...
Inquiry Questions
 What was going through Ms Jia’s mind when she
jots down her obviously heavy to-do list?
 Why was Lian...
Inquiry Questions
 Why was John angry when Ms Jia told him she
caught him cheating?
 Why Ms Jia accused John of cheating...
Presentation Outline
Problems and solutions concerning the teacher:
1. Classroom management
2. Motivation
3. Teaching stra...
Problems in Teacher
2) Classroom Management
A. Lack of control over students
Evidence:
 Miss Jia had to ask for a student...
Solutions
 Miss Jia should develop withitness to reduce
incidences of classroom disruptions. (Withitness
Concept, Kounin)...
Solutions (cont…)
 Miss Jia should establish firm and strict ground rules
in class.
 Miss Jia could employ Contingency C...
Problems in Teacher
B. Lacks consistency in handling
disciplinary issues
Evidence:
 Miss Jia did not take immediate actio...
Solutions
 Teacher should execute punishments or
rewards timely so that students can
match their behaviour with the
conse...
Problems in Teacher
2) Motivation
A. Lacks motivation and passion in teaching
Evidence:
 She questioned her choice of tea...
Solutions
 Teacher should cultivate interest in her
job.
 Take time to know her students better so
as to build rapport a...
Problems in Teacher
3) Teaching strategies
A. Didactic teaching style
Evidence:
 When Minah asked further questions about...
Solutions
 Teacher needs to be mastery-focused in her
teaching.
 Learn to skew lessons towards inquiry
approach to invol...
Problems in Teacher
B. Poor time management skills
Evidence:
 Outwardly lamented about how she is
going to manage her tim...
Solutions
 Prioritize and plan her schedule properly
 Do not over-commit herself
Problems in Teacher
C. Practice of Favoritism
Evidence:
 Teacher attended to Annie’s questions first
when she stepped int...
Solutions
 Teacher should be fair and offer equal
opportunities to students in learning.
 Teacher should learn to contro...
Problems in Students
1) Motivation
A.Students have an external-stable-
uncontrollable causal attribution(Attribution
Theor...
Solutions
 Plan a series of achievement experiences to
help students(Boekaerts, 2006; Brophy, 2004;
Dweck & Elliot,1983):...
Solutions (cont…)
 Expose students to models who struggle to
overcome mistakes before succeeding
(Brophy, 2004)
 Develop...
Problems in Students
B. Students have low self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy
Concept, Albert Bandura,1997)
Evidence:
 John ment...
Solutions
 Guide students to set goals that are specific, proximal
and challenging (Bandura, 1997)
 Teacher can do a stu...
Problems in Students
C. Low social motive in achieving (Social Motive,
Anderson and Wolters, 2006)
Evidence:
 Students do...
Solutions
 Teacher should spend time to understand and
build a rapport with students
 Teacher should explicitly encourag...
Problems in Students
D. Motivated in the wrong aspect
(Erikson’s Lifespan Development
Theory)
Evidence:
 Lian Huay was mo...
Solutions
 Acknowledge each students’ strengths and
weaknesses
 Treat students as unique individuals
 Downplay the atte...
Problems in students
2) Moral Development Issues
A.Lack of Moral Values
Evidence:
 John did not seem to think there is an...
Solutions
 Miss Jia could explain the harmful effects of
smoking instead of just asking him not to do
so.
Problems in Students
B. Disrespectful behaviour towards the
teacher
Evidence:
 John defied Miss Jia and stomps out of the...
Solutions
 Miss Jia could be a role model by showing
care and respect to her students more often.
 Miss Jia could put in...
Problems in Students
C. Students display pre-conventional
Morality(Kolberg’s Levels and stages of Moral
Development Theory...
Solutions
 Miss Jia could capture
teachable moments to
instill moral values in
students whenever
possible
 Guide student...
Conclusion
Relationship is a two-way interaction.
Hence, in most student-teacher conflicts
that happen, both the teacher a...
Theories used:
 Anderson, E.M., & Wolters, C.A.(2006).
Goals, values, and affect: Influences on
Motivation. In P>A> Alexa...
Theories (cont…)
 Brophy J(1998) Motivating Students to
learn. New York: McGraw-hill
 Dweck, C.S., & Elliot, E.(1983)
Ac...
Theories (cont…)
 Kounin, J.S.(1970). Discipline and
management in classrooms. New York:
Holt, Rinehart & Winston
 Maslo...
References:
 Eggen, P, & Kauchak, D. (2010). Education Psychology:
Windows on Classroom (8th ed). NJ: Pearson
 Tan, O. S...
Educational Psychology Scenario 1
Educational Psychology Scenario 1
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Educational Psychology Scenario 1

3,961 views
3,736 views

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
3,961
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
3
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Educational Psychology Scenario 1

  1. 1. Introduction Main characters in scenario:  Miss Jia (Teacher)  John (accused of cheating in test and smokes)  Lian Huay (kept looking into the mirror in class)  Annie (kiasu and teacher’s favorite student)  Minah (inquisitive girl who was told not to ask so much questions)
  2. 2. Inquiry Questions  What was going through Ms Jia’s mind when she jots down her obviously heavy to-do list?  Why was Lian Huay obsessed with appearance?  How will Ms Jia’s reaction to Minah’s questions affect Minah’s development in future lessons?  What motivated John to smoke when he is obviously underage? Why wasn’t John afraid of breaking the law?
  3. 3. Inquiry Questions  Why was John angry when Ms Jia told him she caught him cheating?  Why Ms Jia accused John of cheating in the test without investigating into the situation further?  How can Annie be enthusiastic with Ms Jia’s lesson when the rest of her classmates couldn’t be more bothered?  What theories can we consult to help us better understand the developments of both Ms Jia and her students?
  4. 4. Presentation Outline Problems and solutions concerning the teacher: 1. Classroom management 2. Motivation 3. Teaching strategies Problems and solutions concerning the students: 1. Motivation 2. Moral Development
  5. 5. Problems in Teacher 2) Classroom Management A. Lack of control over students Evidence:  Miss Jia had to ask for a student’s help to get the attention of the class.  Miss Jia allowed students to scold and jeer at one another across the class.  Miss Jia was indifferent to the fact that her student was reading amagazine in class.
  6. 6. Solutions  Miss Jia should develop withitness to reduce incidences of classroom disruptions. (Withitness Concept, Kounin)  Set up Operational definitions for good behaviour. (Operant Conditioning Theory, Thorndike)  Miss Jia could practice Applied Behavioural Analysis (Alberto & Troutman,2006; Gortmaker & others, 2007) by analysing a problematic behaviour and thereafter employ the appropriate remedies to eradicate the problem.
  7. 7. Solutions (cont…)  Miss Jia should establish firm and strict ground rules in class.  Miss Jia could employ Contingency Contracting with John to regulate John’s undesirable behaviour.  Miss Jia could develop students’ inner sense of self- control by explaining why their behaviour are unacceptable instead of scolding them directly.
  8. 8. Problems in Teacher B. Lacks consistency in handling disciplinary issues Evidence:  Miss Jia did not take immediate action against John when he came into class late from smoking but scolded Lian Huay when she looked into the mirror in class
  9. 9. Solutions  Teacher should execute punishments or rewards timely so that students can match their behaviour with the consequences (Umbreit et al., 2007)
  10. 10. Problems in Teacher 2) Motivation A. Lacks motivation and passion in teaching Evidence:  She questioned her choice of teaching as a career.  She was only concerned on completing her lesson without checking her students’ understanding.
  11. 11. Solutions  Teacher should cultivate interest in her job.  Take time to know her students better so as to build rapport and increase students’ sense of belonging and her attachment to the class. (Maslow’s Hierarchical Theory)
  12. 12. Problems in Teacher 3) Teaching strategies A. Didactic teaching style Evidence:  When Minah asked further questions about a concept, Miss Jia felt irritated.  Ms Jia discouraged Minah by insisting that she just need to follow the “rule” without trying to understand the rationale behind it. Hence, she encouraged rote learning and not meaningful learning.
  13. 13. Solutions  Teacher needs to be mastery-focused in her teaching.  Learn to skew lessons towards inquiry approach to involve more student participations.  Foster self-efficacy in students.
  14. 14. Problems in Teacher B. Poor time management skills Evidence:  Outwardly lamented about how she is going to manage her time.  She was approached by the HOD as she was the last to key in the CA results.
  15. 15. Solutions  Prioritize and plan her schedule properly  Do not over-commit herself
  16. 16. Problems in Teacher C. Practice of Favoritism Evidence:  Teacher attended to Annie’s questions first when she stepped into the class without trying to settle the class down.  On the other hand, when Minah asked questions, she discouraged her.
  17. 17. Solutions  Teacher should be fair and offer equal opportunities to students in learning.  Teacher should learn to control her own emotions and should not have any preconceived notion about the learning ability of any student.
  18. 18. Problems in Students 1) Motivation A.Students have an external-stable- uncontrollable causal attribution(Attribution Theory, Bernard Weiner, 1986) Evidence:  Students put all the blame of not performing well on the teacher  Students are so used to teacher’s style of teaching that they can read and predict the teacher’s response  Students do not think they can change Miss Jia’s teaching approaches
  19. 19. Solutions  Plan a series of achievement experiences to help students(Boekaerts, 2006; Brophy, 2004; Dweck & Elliot,1983): i. Concentrate on tasks at hand rather than worrying about failure ii. Cope with failures by retracing their steps to discover their mistakes and discover a better approach iii.Attribute their failures to lack of effort rather than lack of ability
  20. 20. Solutions (cont…)  Expose students to models who struggle to overcome mistakes before succeeding (Brophy, 2004)  Develop a growth mindset in students(Carol Dweck, 2006,2007)  Make learning approaches negotiable (Grolnick & others, 2002)
  21. 21. Problems in Students B. Students have low self-efficacy (Self-Efficacy Concept, Albert Bandura,1997) Evidence:  John mentioned outwardly that he knows that he is not good in Mathematics in class when he was accused of cheating.  Miss Jia reinforced students’ low efficacy by insisting that Minah won’t be able to understand deeper concepts.
  22. 22. Solutions  Guide students to set goals that are specific, proximal and challenging (Bandura, 1997)  Teacher can do a student profiling to be aware of their prior knowledge and teach in their Zone of Proximal Development (Vygotsky Theory)  Attention should be placed on short-term goals after students have set their long-term goals
  23. 23. Problems in Students C. Low social motive in achieving (Social Motive, Anderson and Wolters, 2006) Evidence:  Students do not like the teacher. Minah outwardly said she hates Miss Jia  Very negative peer-group influence (Wigfield & others, 2006) i. When John came in late from smoking, Jimmy glamourised the act by asking the number of sticks he had. ii. When Minah asked questions, the class jeered at her
  24. 24. Solutions  Teacher should spend time to understand and build a rapport with students  Teacher should explicitly encourage good behaviours and show disapproval of unacceptable behaviours  Discourage jeering and discrimination among students  Encourage collaborative learning and respect among students
  25. 25. Problems in Students D. Motivated in the wrong aspect (Erikson’s Lifespan Development Theory) Evidence:  Lian Huay was more engrossed in looking into the mirror than listening to the lesson  Lucy more interested in the magazine than following the lesson
  26. 26. Solutions  Acknowledge each students’ strengths and weaknesses  Treat students as unique individuals  Downplay the attention on physical appearance  Give appropriate praises to students to raise their self-esteem
  27. 27. Problems in students 2) Moral Development Issues A.Lack of Moral Values Evidence:  John did not seem to think there is anything wrong with smoking in school  Fellow classmate, Jimmy, glorified John’s act of smoking by fascinating over the number of cigarette sticks he smoked.
  28. 28. Solutions  Miss Jia could explain the harmful effects of smoking instead of just asking him not to do so.
  29. 29. Problems in Students B. Disrespectful behaviour towards the teacher Evidence:  John defied Miss Jia and stomps out of the class abruptly when accused of cheating.  Class did not acknowledge teacher’s presence or bother to greet her when she walked into the class.  Lian Huay confronted Miss Jia, by saying, “What kind of teacher are you?” in front of the whole class
  30. 30. Solutions  Miss Jia could be a role model by showing care and respect to her students more often.  Miss Jia could put in more effort in building better rapport with students
  31. 31. Problems in Students C. Students display pre-conventional Morality(Kolberg’s Levels and stages of Moral Development Theory) Evidence:  Lian Huay argued that if John could get away with everything, she should also not be penalized for looking into the mirror.  Students have a “buddy system" for smokers to look out for one another  Dua Xia commented aloud that he would help Miss Jia only because he was in a good mood, showing that his morality is influenced by emotions.
  32. 32. Solutions  Miss Jia could capture teachable moments to instill moral values in students whenever possible  Guide students to practice empathy and view things from various perspectives
  33. 33. Conclusion Relationship is a two-way interaction. Hence, in most student-teacher conflicts that happen, both the teacher and the students are responsible in contributing to the problem. Therefore, to reconcile the situation presented in Scenario 1, our group has come up with solutions targeted at changing both the teacher and the students’ behaviours.
  34. 34. Theories used:  Anderson, E.M., & Wolters, C.A.(2006). Goals, values, and affect: Influences on Motivation. In P>A> Alexander & P.H. Winne(Eds), Handbook of educational Psychology(2nd Ed). Mahwah, NJ:Erlbaum  Bandura, A(1982) Self-efficacy Mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37, 122-147
  35. 35. Theories (cont…)  Brophy J(1998) Motivating Students to learn. New York: McGraw-hill  Dweck, C.S., & Elliot, E.(1983) Achievement Motivation. In P. Mussen(Ed), Handbook of Child Psychology(4th Ed, Vol 4). New York: Willey  Graham , S., & Weiner, B. (1996). Theories and principles of motivation. In D.C. Berlina & R.C. Calfee(Eds), Handbook of educational psychology. New York: Macmillan
  36. 36. Theories (cont…)  Kounin, J.S.(1970). Discipline and management in classrooms. New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston  Maslow, A.H.(1954) Motivation and personality. New York: Harper & Row  Weiner B(1986) An attributional theory of motivation and emotions. New York: Springer
  37. 37. References:  Eggen, P, & Kauchak, D. (2010). Education Psychology: Windows on Classroom (8th ed). NJ: Pearson  Tan, O. S, Parsons, R. D., Hilson, S. L., & Sardo –Brown, D. (2011). Education Psychology: A practitioner-researcher approach. An Asian Edition (2nd ed). Singapore: Thomson  Santrock, J. W. (2009). Educational Psychology (4th ed.) (Mc Graw-Hill International edition. Boston: McGraw –Hill  An Overview of Moral Development - derived from http://tigger.uic.edu/~lnucci/MoralEd/overview.html.  Moral and Character Development - derived from http://www.edpsycinteractive.org/topics/morchr/morchr. html.

×