A Vision For Knowledge Through 2020

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  • Before beginning our strategic planning process I brought in national speakers to help library staff better understand the significant changes in higher education, the broader economy and how state and national funding models have changed, along with new and greater expectations for higher education institutions.

    The research university library is but one piece of a very large, complex change ecosystem.
  • Upon my appointment as Vice Provost for Libraries, the Provost provided me with several useful directives including:
    To prepare a personal plan ensuring the continued success of the General Library System.
    I interpreted this directive to include an administrative reorganization addressing the needs of a modern research university library system;
    To provide campus with a strategic plan for its 46 campus libraries;
    And working with the UW Foundation, to build an advancement/development plan for the libraries.
  • Advancing that strategic plan requires a coordinated print management plan that is seen as fundamental to moving forward effectively managing print collections and storage on campus.
    Working with Facilities Planning and Management, the Libraries are invited to design a campus libraries master facilities plan. Questions such as: How many libraries are needed? What are the locations of those libraries? What is a library?—will be addressed.
    However, in order to answer those questions, the Library must first determine a services delivery plan. What are the critical, fundamental library services? How will they be provided, by whom, and where? Answers to these questions will then inform the design of a campus libraries master facilities plan.
    The goal of our work is a sustainable library funding model including adequate support for collections that support research, teaching and learning.
  • I contracted with the Office of Quality Improvement to provide the facilitation assistance for the strategic planning process.
    Together we established a charter, identified sponsors for the project, and developed a clear timeline for our work.
    The Office of Quality Improvement facilitated focus group meetings with stakeholder groups, analyzed data, and held us to the established timeline. (May 2013 – December 2013)

    Without their assistance it is unlikely that we would have completed the work in a timely manner.
  • Meetings and focus groups with internal and external stakeholder groups were exceedingly important. They were the basis for our data.
    We met with campus groups including students, faculty, administrators, and library staff.
    We met with colleagues from UW System, the CIC and ARL .

    Questions were formulated for each group; what does the library do well? Where do we need to improve? What will the library look like in 10 years?

    The data was analyzed and summarized and presented at a retreat with participants representing a diagonal slice of all of the stake holder groups.

    The comments and data were then further refined into a vision, mission, and three fundamental components to the strategic framework.

    The process was in fact critical to the success of the project.

    And facilitation from OQI was also critical to our success.
  • Throughout the course of the strategic framework discussions we heard time and again from stakeholders the need for libraries to exert campus leadership in defining the course of the research library. We were told that we are on the right course with the administrative reorganizations, strategic planning discussions, and the creation of a more robust advancement/development program for campus libraries.


    From those discussions we feel empowered and energized to meet the challenges in front of us.

  • A Vision For Knowledge Through 2020

    1. 1. A Vision for Knowledge through 2020 Eurasian Higher Education Leaders Forum June 2014 University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    2. 2. Vision—Path Forward • Administrative reorganiztion • Provide campus with a campus libraries strategic framework – Goals and Objectives – Services delivery plan • Advancement/development plan – Comprehensive campaign University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    3. 3. Vision—Path Forward • Print management strategy – Rely on electronic content help in perpetuity – Rely on shared print management • Design a campus libraries master facilities plan • Services delivery plan • Build a sustainable library funding model – Collections in all formats – UW System and Campus University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    4. 4. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    5. 5. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    6. 6. • Mission • University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries provide: • Leadership for the selection, organization, access and preservation of sources of knowledge in all formats; • Exemplary information services designed to fulfill the needs of a great public research university; • Inspirational environments for collaborative and individual discovery, study and learning. • Vision • The Libraries are essential partners in the creative exploration, intellectual growth, and scholarly pursuits of the University. • To that end, the Libraries will: • Invest in user experiences that inspire the creation, discovery, and sharing of knowledge: – Services – Physical Spaces – Virtual Spaces • Provide expertise, services, and tools that prominently position the Libraries throughout the lifecycle of research, teaching and learning. • Integrate innovative approaches to how the Libraries develop, disseminate, and preserve collection and information resources. • • http://www.library.wisc.edu/administration/strategicplanning2013/index.html University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    7. 7. • Questions and Discussion University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    8. 8. Accessibility in Research Libraries • Discussion Points University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    9. 9. Accessibility and Universal Design • Complaints and Settlements • NFB Response to EDUCAUSE and I2 E- textbook Pilot • The Authors Guild v. HathiTrust • Model US License • Ontario Council of University Libraries (OCUL) Draft Language for Model Licenses University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    10. 10. Accessibility and Universal Design • International collaboration at scale • Toolkits • Uniformity with production standards EPub3 format • Dialogue with publishers University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    11. 11. Typical Reformatting Workflow • Capture a digital still image of a page using a digital photocopier, flatbed scanner, or specialized book scanner. • Run OCR software on the page image to automatically extract electronic text. • Repeat step 1 if the OCR process yields too many errors due to a poor-quality scan. • Repeat steps 1–3 for each page of text to be reformatted. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    12. 12. Typical Reformatting Workflow (continued) • Ensure that the reading order is proper (if there are columns, footnotes, sidebars, etc.). • Edit the digital copy for OCR errors and add additional description, if needed. • Convert pages containing mathematical symbols to MathML using one of a number of open source or inexpensive programs. • Deliver a final digital copy of the text in the requested accessible format. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    13. 13. Recommendations • Retrospective print library collections and prospective digital library resources require very different strategies to achieve accessibility for patrons with print disabilities. • Universal accessibility should be embedded in future licensed and acquired products and services so special conversion to a usable format will only be required for retrospective works. With born-digital texts, e-readers, and other mobile devices, research libraries should advocate for accessible solutions up front—born- accessible materials—obviating the need for resource- intensive reformatting and retrofitting. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    14. 14. Recommendations • The growing demand for instructional e-content and burgeoning digital library collections requires greater collaboration amongst all institutional partners, including academic leadership, research libraries, disability services, and information technology services. These partners should share knowledge, define roles, and become knowledgeable about print disabilities, in order to effectively serve users, to meet the requirements of federal and provincial law, to fulfill mission, and to move the market. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    15. 15. Recommendations • Members of the research library community should collaborate within each institution and actively participate in cross-institutional and cross-industry efforts to advance universal design standards for digital information resources, library-mediated or otherwise. Such collaboration will also be most cost effective in acquiring accessible information products and services. • Research libraries should institute a plan to make all future websites, pages, and documents accessible while tackling older web resources over time. University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    16. 16. • Report of ARL Joint Task Force on Services to Patrons with Print Disabilities (PDF) http://www.arl.org/bm~doc/print-disabilities- tfreport02nov12.pdf University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    17. 17. Administrative Organization • Discussion Points University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    18. 18. Administrative Organization • Team based • Fewer silos • Fewer staff • Centralize what can be centralized • Build on strength--Unique and distinctive • PROVIDE LEADERSHIP! University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu
    19. 19. Administrative Organization • Must have a plan – Services delivery plan • Collaboration at scale: preservation, digitization, curation, large-scale acquisitions, institutional repositories • Supporting communities of scholarship and learning University of Wisconsin-Madison Libraries • Madison, WI 53706 Phone: (608) 262-3193 • www.library.wisc.edu

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