Academic Writing Workshop Fall 2011
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Academic Writing Workshop Fall 2011

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By: Jonathan Burke (Duban)

By: Jonathan Burke (Duban)

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Academic Writing Workshop Fall 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Slide position_1:1
  • 2. Slide position_1:14Section T iS i Topic Details D il • General document structure & terms Foundation • Writing an academic abstract principles • Revising & proofreading Revising & proofreading • Style conventions & referencing Academic  2 principles Vocabulary & grammar •V b l & • Technical object & process description Document  • Research proposals 3 types • Journal & conference papers
  • 3. Slide position_2:14Document St tD t StructureTitle • Descriptive of document subject Descriptive of document subject • Document navigation toolAbstract • Identify key document content • Expert audience • Identify key document contentSummary • Less/non‐specialized audienceGlossary • Explanation of technical terms
  • 4. Slide position_3:14Document St tD t StructureContext • Information background Information backgroundData • Information gathered & analyzed Information gathered & analyzedAnalysis • Explanatory investigation of data Explanatory investigation of data • Summary of interpretation y pConclusionC l i • Recommendations, applicationBibliography • Description of sources used bl h i i f d
  • 5. Slide position_4:14WritingW iti an abstract bt t • Summarize purpose & contentPurpose • Guide reader through document • Present conclusions • Background challenge • Research aimStructure • Brief details of methodology • Summary findings & results • Key conclusionForm &  • Brief & descriptivecontent • Appropriate to audience
  • 6. Slide position_5:14‘This study is about some research we didthe other day. First we selected ourresearch topic. Then we looked for somedata. After we found our data, we didsome t t and analyzed it Th tests d l d it. Then, wewrote up our conclusion andrecommendations. You can find out moreif you read our article ’ article.
  • 7. Slide position_6:14‘We examined algorithmic application ofant path finding behaviour to optimalvehicle delivery routes.Ants are social iA i l insects whose b h i h behaviourcan teach us many useful things about y goptimal path finding. Algorithms aremathematical instruction sets fordescribing processes.’
  • 8. Slide position_7:14‘Viewing a late night movie in home is amodern convenience. But, winterenvironment is cold, especially in the latenight. How to enjoy the movie and staywarm i a serious problem t b solved. is i bl to be l dHerein we find the solution! Specialmaterial full body sleeping bag with arm full‐bodyand leg holes is designed.’
  • 9. Slide position_8:14‘This study aims to measure the on‐roadspatial distribution of levels of carbonmonoxide, a health hazard known to beincreasing in Middletown.Methods of measurement are discussedand the difference between on‐road andfixed‐sitefixed site data is analysed ’ analysed.
  • 10. Slide position_9:14‘The influence of temperature, windspeed and humidity is considered.Conclusions as to the effectiveness of thismethod of carbon monoxide monitoring h d f b id i iare given, together with suggested g , g ggrecommendations for future air qualitysampling programmes ’ programmes.
  • 11. Slide position_10:14‘You need to actively avoid writing thistype. This describes the structure of thedocument. It does not give the mainfindings and conclusions. It is like a roadmap.’’Silyn‐Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 12. Slide position_11:14‘This structural description is generallyused only in a long selfcontainedliterature review.Postgraduate writing nearly always needsP d ii l l dthe informative type of abstract (see yp (below).’Silyn‐Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 13. Slide position_12:14‘Assessors, journal editors and conferenceorganizers often ask for the descriptivetype to be avoided.Care i needed to avoid d if i iC is d d id drifting into i itstypical phrasing and structure.’ yp p gSilyn‐Roberts, WritingSilyn‐Roberts ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000) Engineering
  • 14. Slide position_13:14GoodG d quality abstract checklist lit b t t h kli tContext • Explaining the background Explaining the backgroundPurpose • Describing the reason for the study Describing the reason for the studyMethod • How the study was conducted How the study was conductedResultsR lt • Q lit ti d Qualitative description i tiConclusion l • Final analysis, recommendations i l l i d i
  • 15. Slide position_14:14RevisingR i i & proofreading f di • Use a printed form, double spacedHow to read • Read aloud, slowly & carefully • Use a co‐reader • Highlight content for revisionModifying  • Write brief notes on the documentcontent • Revise with document in handModifying  • Check style conventionsstyle • Check punctuation & grammarProofreading  • Use a style guide to check your work Use a style guide to check your workchecklist
  • 16. Slide position_1:14Section T iS i Topic Details D il • General document structure & terms Foundation 1 principles • Writing an academic abstract • Revising & proofreading Revising & proofreading • Style conventions & referencing Academic  Vocabulary & grammar •V b l & principles • Technical object & process description Document  • Research proposals 3 types • Journal & conference papers
  • 17. Slide position_2:14StyleSt l conventions tiStyle  • Standardized style formsconventions • Identified by journalsReferencing  • Harvard, Chicago, APA, SBLconventions • Typically subject specificSI units &  • Système International d’ Unités yabbreviations • International standard practiceEditorial  • R f t j Refer to journal for guidance lf idconventions
  • 18. Slide position_3:14Silyn-Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 19. Slide position_4:14Silyn-Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 20. Slide position_5:14Vocabulary & grammarV b l • Figures for measured quantities • Words for numbers 1‐10 • Figures for numbers 11+Figures &  • Figures for mixed listwords • Words for number at sentence start • Figures for percentages • Words for fractions • Figures for dates & times
  • 21. Slide position_6:14Silyn-Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 22. Slide position_7:14Silyn-Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 23. Slide position_8:14Vocabulary & grammarV b l • Equation text should be centeredEquations • Equation number tabbed to right • Cite using form ‘Eq. (#)’ Silyn-Roberts, ‘Writing for Science & Engineering’ (2000)
  • 24. Slide position_9:14Technical bj tT h i l object & process d description i ti 1.Numbering: firstly, secondly, thirdly (no more than five steps); in step one, in step two, in step three (no more than five steps)Describingsteps 2.Sequencing: initially, to start with, to begin, at first (beginning words); next, then, now (sequencing words); finally, eventually, at last (ending words)
  • 25. Slide position_10:14Technical bj tT h i l object & process d description i ti 3.Consequence: as a result of [verb]‐Describing ing, now the [noun] is [verb]‐ed, thesteps [noun] may now, consequently, after [verb]‐ing, having [verb]‐ed
  • 26. Slide position_11:14Technical bj tT h i l object & process d description i ti 1. A set of actions for a purpose: the [verb]‐ing process/procedureDescribingactions 2. A stage where one kind of action takes place: the [noun]/[verb]‐ing stage/phase
  • 27. Slide position_12:14Technical bj tT h i l object & process d description i ti 1. Time references: the cans are heated for 5 minutes; after 2 hours, the fruit is cannedAdding  2. Volume/size/weight references:details the milk is poured into 20 liter bottles; the thread is cut into 900m lengths; the bricks are piled in 100 kilogram stacks
  • 28. Slide position_13:14Technical bj tT h i l object & process d description i ti 3. Action references: a drying oven = something is dried; a roller = usedAdding  to roll something; material movesdetails through a grid; new or extra material is added
  • 29. Slide position_14:14Vocabulary & grammarV b lTense, voice  • Check tense& mood • Avoid overuse of passive moodEfficient • Reduce use of prepositionsstructures • Avoid too many conjunctionsGrammatical • Use appropriate person Use appropriate personpersonCommon  • Tense confusionerrors • Verb/noun disagreement
  • 30. Slide position_1:14Section T iS i Topic Details D il • General document structure & terms Foundation 1 principles • Writing an academic abstract • Revising & proofreading Revising & proofreading • Style conventions & referencing Academic  2 principles Vocabulary & grammar •V b l & • Technical object & process description Document  • Research proposals types • Journal & conference papers
  • 31. Slide position_2:7Research proposalsR h lType &  • Standardized style formssubject • Identified by journals • Summary • Research objectives • BackgroundStructure • Survey of existing literature • Methods & procedures • Time schedule • Resources
  • 32. Slide position_3:7Research proposalsR h l • Explanation of key concept • Clear description of method • Rationale for fundingContent • Persuasive argumentation • Demonstration of competence • Relevance to subject
  • 33. Slide position_4:7Research proposals: assessment criteriaR h l t it iValidity • Should it be taken seriously? Should it be taken seriously?Soundness • Experimental design is sound Experimental design is soundSignificance • Explain contribution to literature Explain contribution to literatureRelevanceR l • E l i Explain relevance to funding body l t f di b dCompetence • Are the researchers competent? h h ?
  • 34. Slide position_5:7Research proposals: assessment criteriaR h l t it iBudget • Is it appropriate? Is it appropriate?Evaluation • How is its merit to be assessed? How is its merit to be assessed?Advantage • How will it benefit the funding body? How will it benefit the funding body?LanguageL • I th l Is the language clear & accessible? l & ibl ?
  • 35. Slide position_6:7Journal papersJ lDistinctive  • Demonstration of prior knowledgefeatures • Argumentation for new contribution • Title, author, abstract, keywords,Structure introduction, method, results, discussion, conclusion • Substantiated argumentationContent • Demonstrated competence • Obvious contribution to the field
  • 36. Slide position_7:7Journal papersJ l • Receipt by review boardReview  • Review by refereesprocess • Referee recommendations • Acceptance, more review, rejection • Read all comments with care • Do not take comments personallyResponding  • Recognize superior knowledgeto rejection • Amend accordingly • Note comments for future reference • Respond respectfully
  • 37. Slide position_1:1Section T iS i Topic Details D il • General document structure & terms Foundation 1 principles • Writing an academic abstract • Revising & proofreading Revising & proofreading • Style conventions & referencing Academic  2 principles Vocabulary & grammar •V b l & • Technical object & process description Document  • Research proposals 3 types • Journal & conference papers