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  • Professional studies
  • The Procedures for Teacher Training and Professional Development in information and communication technology (ICT) is one of the wits undertaken by the Department of Education to implement the White Paper on e-Education. (ICT) is important to the application of e-education and bargains better chances to access learning, redress inequities and improve the excellence of teaching and learning. The notion of e-Education revolves around the use of ICT to quicken the accomplishment of national education goals. These goals reinforce the development and application of the National Curriculum Statement (NCS). The experiment for teacher development in ICT is to offer teachers with the essential knowledge, skills and understanding to effectively integrate ICT into everyday educational practices in a significant way. Learning through the use of ICT refers to using ICT to support new ways of teaching and learning. This necessitates a critical dialogue, analysis among teachers, and research resources to expand teachers' perspectives on the benefits of ICT. The White Paper on e-Education requires that the use of ICT, as a set of flexible tools for teaching and learning, be combined into the Initial Professional Education of Teachers and Continuing Professional Teacher Development. This involves that all teachers should obtain relevant and appropriate ICT knowledge and skills, and be able to assimilate ICT suitably in teaching, learning and administration.
  • Education and training’s vision is to ensure that all children can access and benefit from high quality education. This requires a range of early childhood development services and programmes that support the holistic development of young children. These services need to be flexible so that they can be responsive to the needs of the children, families and communities. Early childhood development is critical for ensuring that children are able to reach their full potential. Teachers must have a good knowledge of the subjects they teach. There need to be an institutional structure, including bursary progremmes for existing teachers, that promotes good teaching by attracting, investing in and retaining the best teachers. The curriculum will need to be tailored to the needs of South African society.
  • Districts should provide targeted support to improve practice within school, and ensure communication and information sharing between authorities and schools. Parents need to be given meaningful information on their children’s performance. This requires teachers to carry out assignment practices that enable learners to compare their performance with their counterparts in the other schools in the district. Language not only carry knowledge, but also create new and better knowledge. Language policy needs to be informed by a greater appreciation of the labour market imperatives. Leaners need to receive high-quality instruction in both their mother tongue and English from early in the foundation phase. Infrastructure backlogs needs to be addressed so that all schools meet basic infrastructure and equipment standards set by the national department of basic education. This requires targeted action to address the lack of basic infrastructure , such as libraries, books, science laboratories, sport fields, electricity and running water.
  • the number of ICT development stages varies depending on the context, there is a general consensus that the introduction and use of ICTs in education proceeds in broad stages that may be conceived as a continuum or series of steps, namely: Emerging, Applying, Infusing, and Transforming, each of the successive stages in the continuum gets richer in both technology and pedagogy in terms of quality and complexity. The Emerging Stage is categorized by educational creations just beginning to explore theLikelihoods and consequences of using ICT forinstitutional management and adding ICT to thecurriculum. At the Applying Stage, administrators and teachers use ICT for activities already agreed out in official management and in the curriculum. teachers at this stage involve themselves in incorporating ICT to obtain specific subject skills and knowledge, starting to change their teaching methodology in the classroom, and using ICT to backing their training and professional development. The Infusing Stage is categorized by educational institutions involved in assimilating or ICT across the curriculum, and in employing a variety of computer-based technologies in laboratories, classrooms, and administrative offices. At the Transforming Stage teachers and other staff members concern ICT as a natural part of the everyday life of the institutions and initiate to look at the process of teaching and learning in new ways. The emphasis changes from teacher-centered to learner-centered.
  • Teachers use their knowledge of subject matter,teaching and learning, and technology to facilitateexperiences that advance student learning,creativity, and innovation in both face-to-faceand virtualenvironments. Teachers design, develop, and evaluate authentic learning experiences and assessment incorporating contemporary tools and resources to maximize content learning in context and to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes identified in the NETS·S. Teachers exhibit knowledge, skills, and workprocesses representative of an innovative professional in a global and digital society. Teachers understand local and global societal issues and responsibilities in an evolving digital culture and exhibit legal and ethical behaviour in their professional practices. Teachers continuously improve their professionalpractice, model lifelong learning, and exhibit leadership in their school and professional community by promoting and demonstrating the effective use of digital tools and resources.
  • The minister of basic education is Mrs. Angie Motshekga, the deputy minister of education is Mr. Enver Surty, and the Director-general of basic education is Bobby Soobrayan. This are the people who are in
  • We will intensify teacher development to prepare educators for the implementation of the Curriculumand Assessment Policy Statement and pay special attention to the training of principals, particularlythose in underperforming schools. In line with the call made by President Jacob Zuma in the 2011 State of the Nation Address emphasisingthe need for more focus on the Triple T – Teachers, Text and Time – we will double our efforts on theprovision of high-quality workbooks in literacy and numeracy to Grades 1-6 learners and numeracyand life skills to Grade R learners. We will also focus on providing a textbook for every learner in everysubject. We will conduct Annual National Assessments in literacy and numeracythat are internationallybenchmarked. We will strengthen district support and development and improve intervention at class level so as topromote the quality of teaching and learning. To achieve quality education we need to ensure the provision of sound infrastructure. This priorityfocuseson the need to guarantee that learners and teachers are able to function in an enabling physical andphysiological (health and welfare)environment. ASIDI adds focus and momentum to the Department’sAction Plan to 2014 and the goals of Schooling 2025.
  • Education is a basic human right; a path to exploit individualPotential, spread freedoms, shape capabilities and open up opportunities. Global competitiveness necessitates new knowledge and skills, which are reliant on a solid foundation of basic education. Ensuring that by 2015, children everywhere both boys and girls will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling. Expand and improve comprehensive early childhood care and education especially for the most vulnerable and disadvantaged children. Ensuring that the learning needs of all young equitable access to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes.
  • The Department of Basic Education has a crucial leadership, policy-making and monitoring responsibility in improving the quality of learning and ensuring sustained education quality improvement across the education sector. The focus of all our education and quality improvement strategies is the learner and the quality of learning attained for effective and lifelong growth, development and well-being. This focus clearly guides our thinking as to what has to be done to ensure that we are creating an enabling environment for effective teaching and learning so that all our citizens are empowered to participate effectively in society and the economy. At a fundamental level, a challenge for the basic education sector is to accept that certain things must change in the interests of the future of South Africa and that there cannot be ‘business as usual’. However, this does not mean that there needs to be fundamental change to the system of policies governing schools. Over the short time that the Department has operated as the Department for Basic Education, it has developed a dynamic drive to redress the imbalances of the past and to ensure equity in the provision of education across the country with particular attention paid to gender equity.
  • Our vision is of a South Africa in which all our people will have access to lifelong learning, education andtraining opportunities which will, in turn, contribute towards improving the quality of life and the buildingof a peaceful, prosperous and democratic South Africa. Working together with provinces, our mission is to provide relevant and cutting edge quality education for the 21st century. Placing the interest of our children first, the Department adheres to the following values: People: Upholding the Constitution, being accountable to the government and the people of South Africa. Excellence: Maintaining high standards of performance and professionalism by aiming for excellence in everything we do, including being fair, ethical and trustworthy in all that we do.Teamwork: Co-operating with one another and with our partners in education in an open andsupportive way to achieve shared goals.Learning: Creating a learning organisation in which staff members seek and share knowledge and information, while committing themselves to personal growth. Innovation: Striving to address the training needs for high-quality service and seeking ways to achieve our goals. Since 1994, a number of policies have been implemented and legislation promulgated to create aframework for transformation in education and training. A summary of key policies and legislationfollows. Millennium Development Goal 1 aims at eradicating extreme poverty and hunger around the world. Reducing poverty is also a central concern for the South African government. In the South Africancontext of high unemployment coupled with a widely recognised skills shortfall, giving South Africans abetter educational start in life will reduce poverty.
  • education offers engaging and fast-evolving learning environments, shapes the limits between formal and informal education and prompts teachers to improve new ways of teaching and allowing students to learn. For teacher-educators, theseappendices can be used to develop full curricula for courses on ICT competencies. The ICT emphasizes poverty reduction and improved quality of life and improvements in the quality of education. ICT can be a driver for growthand empowerment, with profound implications for improving education. Education and human capacitydevelopment enable individuals to add value to the economy, contribute to the cultural legacy and participatein social discourse. Education enables them to improve the health of their family and the community and toconserve thenatural environment. It is through access to high-quality education for all, regardless of gender,ethnicity, religion or language, that thesepersonal contributions are multiplied and the benefits of growth canbe equitably distributed and enjoyed.
  • The policy goal of the technology literacy approach isto enable learners, citizens and the workforce to use ICTto support social development and improve economicproductivity. Related policy goals include increasingenrolments, making high-qualityresources available toall, and improving literacy skills. Teachers should be awareof these goals and be able to identify the components ofeducation reform programmes that correspond to thesepolicy goals. Corresponding changes in the curriculumentailed by this approach might include improvingbasic literacy skills through technology and adding the development of ICT skills into relevant curriculum contexts. Changes in pedagogical practice involvethe use of various ICT tools and digital content as partof whole class, group and individual student activities.Changes in teacher practice involve knowing whereand when (as well as when not) to use technology forclassroom activities and presentations, for management
  • A mother-tongue teacher understands the basic principles of using ICT in teaching, so he/sheconsiders how to make the best use of an interactive whiteboard recently installed in his/herclassroom. Until now, she has only used it as a projector screen. The teacher realizes that using word processing on the interactive whiteboard would offera new approach to one of the basic skills in the curriculum - how to improvethe wording ofsentences. Word processing allows words to be changed and moved around without having toendlessly re-write wholesentences on paper. The aim of the of technology in education is to increase the ability ofstudents, citizens, and the workforce toadd value to society and to the economyby applying the knowledge gained inschool subjects to solve complex, high priorityproblemsencountered in realworld situations of work, society andin life generally. Teachers should also be ableto use ICT to create and monitor individual and group student project plans, as well as to access information andexperts and collaborate with other teachers to support their own professional learning.
  • The ICT-CFT is meant to be used in a modular fashion. Teacher-education institutions and providers of professionallearning do not need to address all the modules and competencies in any particular course or learning activity.Rather, they can design offerings that address only certain modules but are nonetheless consistent with theoverall goals and rationale of the Framework. This means that courses and professional learning activities shouldnot consist of a small number of disconnected competencies. There should be a clear rationale for the modulesselected. The selection might bebased on a rationale of breadth, in which all of the modules for one approachare addressed. A rationale of depth could select the samemodule, for example Pedagogy, in each of the threeapproaches. A role rationale could select those modules which were particularly relevant forcertain roles, suchas technology coordinators, curriculum coordinators, or principals. Other types of rationale and patterns are alsopossible.
  • A global revolution is currently taking place in education and training. It is driven by the changing nature of work, the realities of the information age, new global partnerships and an awareness of the need for equaldistribution of educational opportunities. Education systems have an obligation to deliver on public expectations ofquality education for economic growth and social development. These efforts are, in most instances,undermined by factors such as fiscal constraints, spatial barriers and othercapacity-related limitations to delivery. As demonstrated in variouscontexts,information and communication technologies (ICTs) have the potential andcapacity to overcome most of these barriers. The ICT revolution has had an impact on curriculum development anddelivery and continues to pose new challenges for education and trainingsystems around the world. Africa is a developing continent. The lack of developed infrastructure forinformation and communication technologies is widening the gap betweenAfrica and the developed world.
  • In response to this under-development, Africa has adopted a renewal framework, the New Partnership for Africa's Development (NEPAD), which identifies ICTs as central in the struggle to reduce poverty on the continent. ICTs provide hope for overcoming barriers of social and geographical isolation, increase access to information and education, and enable the poor to participate in the making of decisions that have an impact ontheir lives. Within education and training specifically, NEPAD recognises the pivotal role of ICTs in the establishment of regional distance learning and health education programmes to improve the situation in the health and education sectors. In order to realise the benefits of ICTs, Africa must develop and produce a pool of ICT-proficient youth and students, from which the country can draw trainee ICT engineers, programmers and software developers.
  • Former president Thabo Mbeki hasunderscored the importance of ICTs for social and economic development atnumerous South African and international fora. In 2001 the Presidential National Commission on Information Society andDevelopment (PNC on ISAD), consisting of representatives from the publicand private sectors, was established. The Commission advises Governmenton the optimal use of ICTs to address South Africa's developmentchallenges and enhance South Africa's global competitiveness. At the same time, a Presidential International Advisory Council onInformation Society and Development (PIAC on ISAD) was established. The role of the Advisory Council is to adviseGovernment on addressing the digital divide. Despite the difficulties that constrain the integration of ICTs intomanagement, teaching and learning, the Ministry isdetermined to direct theimplementation of a progressive programme for change.
  • Every teacher and learner in General and Further Education and Training must haveaccess to ICT infrastructure. National and provincial hardware and software requirements and rollout targets must be set by projecting the long-term technological needs of South Africa. This will be based on anticipated educational needs and objectives. At provincial level, the Department of Education will establish a desired level of technology resources (hardware and software) for each GET and FET institution and assess the adequacy of existing equipment and facilities. National and provincial managers and administrators must plan and mobilise funds for provincial, district and institutional resources to support hardware andequipment installation, as well as maintenance and repair thereof. Central to equipping institutions with an ICT infrastructure is the provision of electricity and a physical infrastructure. Although there are ICT provisions that use alternative sources of energy, the Department of Education will work with the Department of Minerals and Energy to prioritise the electrification programme for GET and FET institutions. The Department of Education will develop norms and standards for new and refurbished buildings and facilities for the use of ICTs.
  • that do not preclude new or better products, to guide thepurchase of hardware, software and other technologies for GET and FETinstitutions within provinces. Provincial education departments mustprepare guidelines for GET and FET institutions and districts for acquisitionofequipment, including software, that is compatible with provincialnetworks. The guidelines will describe how the provincial educationdepartmentswill ensure that equipment in GET and FET institutions meetsthe highest possible level of inter-operability and open system design as perthe minimum content and hardware/software inter-operability standards. The Department of Education will promote and support the establishment oftraining programmes and small business incubators for the maintenanceand refurbishment of computers.
  • Knowledge is acquired through experience or education, and it can be transformed from one person to the other. ICT can contribute in knowledgeable society because it brings solidarity, justice, democracy and peace. All these factors can also contribute eradicating poverty, unemployment, pandemics such as HIV/AIDS and crime. A society can use ICT to learn and to improve their living conditions because a educated society know how to effectively use the infrastructure that the government provide to them. A knowledgeable society works together with the school in educating the youth and contributes in education and participate in the community activities. Knowledge society is a society that is thriving for grow and success, the world that we live in now is growing very fast and require people who are willing to learn and stretch their knowledge and understanding because we need technology literacy in our everyday lives.
  • As educators, we want not only an Information Society, but a Knowledge Society, enabling all children and all people to access Knowledge and to benefit from being educated therefor teaching mutual understanding between human beings is essential. Education is a key issue in the Knowledge Society hence teaching ethics of humanity will help developing a well behaved and understanding society, and Educators have a major mission to teach and prepare citizens of the world, also help in teaching the citizens good communication skills and collaborative skills because if they work together they can achieve more. Particularly, it is the responsibility of all educators and decision-makers around the world to help developing countries take part in the developments of ICT in Education that will require new knowledge, access to knowledge, new teaching and learning methods, new tools resources and pedagogies and new teaching profession.
  • Stellenbosch state that in the knowledge society every learner is a lifelong learner because we live in a growing and revolving world whereby getting educated is an ongoing process and ICT tools develop everyday. Thus the curriculum and teaching methods and tools must take into consideration the preparation for lifelong learning by developing a curriculum that will meet learners requirements and tools methods that will facilitate the new designed curriculum.The progresses of lifelong learning require an incorporation of education into the real world - ICT should be used for this purpose. Lifelong learning must be encouraged in all countries, as a tool for reducing the Digital Divide.
  • Life long learningBetter society
  • Internet is a tool used by human beings to share knowledge of information to people all over the world. The shared knowledge can be in a form of video, pictures, social networks, data and so forth. Internet is mainly a tool, the more recent we found for perfecting our intelligence throughcooperation and exchange… The true revolution of Internet is not at all a revolution of machines, but of communication between human beings… Internet enhances our capacity for collective learning and intelligence… Each community realises that it is one of the dimensions of the production of human sense… Internet forces us to experiment new ways of being together… The ethics of collective intelligence, consisting in interlacing different points of view… (Pierre LEVY, 2000)
  • The government is shaping and developing the process of education by developing technology-enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning, and assessing their own progress. The use of new technologies in education implies new teacher roles, new pedagogies and new approaches to teacher education6. The successful integration of Technology into the classroom will depend on the ability of teachers to structure the learning environment in new ways, to merge new technology with a new pedagogy, to develop socially active classrooms, encouraging co-operative interaction, collaborative learning and group work. This requires a different set of classroom management skills. The teaching skills of the future will include the ability to develop innovative ways of using technology to enhance the learning environment, and to encourage technology literacy, knowledge deepening and knowledge creation. Teacher professional learning will be a crucial component of this educational improvement.
  • The policy goal of technology use is to enable learners, citizens and the workforce to use ICT to support social development and improve economic productivity. Related educational goals include increasing school enrolments, making high-quality resources available to all, and improving basic literacy skills, including technology literacy. The Guidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT is a step towards guiding the development of the ICT knowledge and skills of teachers to enhance the educational experiences of learners in the implementation of the National Curriculum Statement. The Framework is an attempt to provide direction in addressing the ICT training needs of teachers and attempts to move away from imposing a narrow vision of the appropriate use of ICT in teaching and learning.
  • I trust that the Guidelines for Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT will contribute towards the meaningful use of ICT in education. As teachers become more conversant with ICT and learn to harness its potential, I believe that new perspectives will unfold and these will enrich their own teaching practices as well as the educational experiences of learners.
  • Investment in childhood development is a key priority. The focus is on children under the age of five years. By 2030, all children should start their learning development centers. The benefits of investing in early intervention programmes include improvements in school enrolment rates, retention and academic performance, decline in antisocial behavior and high school completion. About 80% of schools and learners achieve 50% above in literacy, mathematics and science in grade three, six and nine. The department aims to improve its average inn Southern East Africa consortium for monitoring education quality results. The department proposes to establish community education and training centers which will incorporate the current public learning centers. The number of people embarking on careers in science and technology should times the current levels.
  • About half of children out of school now live in delicate and conflict affected states. These states are the worst armed to address the challenges of education for all, and the least funded by contributors. Education can be a tool that can be used in addressing and educating societies about social issues like HIV/AIDS, poverty, hunger, unemployment and so forth. The GMR 2008 shows that HIV/AIDS still poses an enormous threat to the educational sector but does not recognise the vital role played by teachers’ unions in decreasing its negative impact.
  • ICTeTSA is organized around six interrelated domains or broad standards of teachers, namely: I) Engage in Instructional Design Processes, ii) Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning, Innovation and Creativity, iii) Create and Manage Effective Learning Environments, iv) Engage in Assessment and Communication of Student Learning, v) Engage in Professional Development and Model Ethical Responsibilities, and vi) Understand Subject Matter for Use in Teaching. Each domain of teaching/teacher standard has its own competences/performance indicators that deal with the minimum knowledge, skills and attitudes expected of 21st century teachers in Africa. The six standards are presented diagrammatically as in figure 1, with each standard emanating from the six sides of the holistic hexagonal ICTeTSA. In other words, teachers who meet the minimum of these separate but interrelated standards are believed to have mastered the ICTenhanced teacher standards for Africa.
  • The end

Teacher training and development Teacher training and development Presentation Transcript

  • The use of technology in education, teachertraining and professional developmentProfessional studies
  • TEACHER TRAINING ANDDEVELOPMENT Teacher Training and Professional Development in ICT The importance of Information and communicationtechnology (ICT). The notion of e-education The challenge for teacher development in ICT Learning though the use of ICT The requirements of the white paper on e-Education
  • REFINING EDUCATION, TRAININGAND INVENTION Education and training’s vision Early childhood development Teachers need to have good content knowledge of thesubject they teach. programmes and institutional structures that supportteacher training Reforming the curriculum
  • REFINING EDUCATION, TRAINING ANDINVENTION CONTINUES….. Districts should provide targeted support teachers should report children’s performanceto parents language policy Infrastructure backlogs needs to be addressed Leaners need to receive high-quality instructionin both their mother tongue and English
  • THE ICT TEACHER DEVELOPMENT ICT development stages varies depending on the context stages in the continuum gets richer in both technologyand pedagogy The emerging stage The applying stage Infusing stage Transforming Stage
  • EFFECTIVE TEACHERS MODEL Facilitate and Inspire Student Learning and creativity Design and Develop Digital Age Learning experiencesand Assessments Model Digital Age Work and Learning Promote and Model Digital Citizenship and Responsibility Engage in Professional Growth and Leadership
  • MINISTERSMrs Angie MotshekgaMinister of Basic EducationMr Enver Surty,Deputy Minister of Basic EducationMr Bobby SoobrayanDirector-General of BasicEducation
  • STRATEGIC PLAN FOR BASICEDUCATION Teacher Development Learner support materials Annual National Assessments District Development Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative(ASIDI)
  • GOALS AND AIMS OF BASICEDUCATION Education is a basic human right Ensuring that by 2015, children everywhere will be able tocomplete a full course of primary schooling. Expand and improve comprehensive early childhoodcare and education Ensuring that the learning needs of all young equitableaccess to appropriate learning and life-skills programmes
  • GOALS AND AIMS OF BASICEDUCATION CONTINUES… The Department of Basic Education has a crucial leadership The focus of education and quality improvement strategies This focus guides our thinking At a fundamental level, a challenge for the basic educationsector is to accept that certain things must change the Department for Basic Education has developed adynamic drive to redress the imbalances of the past
  • STRATEGIC OVERVIEWvision Mission ValuesConstitutional, Legislativeand PolicyMandatesSituationalanalysisStrategicOutcomeOrientedOutputs
  • T H E U N E S C O I C T C O M P E T E N C Y F R A M E W O R KF O R T E A C H E R STECHNOLOGYLITERACYKNOWLEDGEDEEPENINGKNOWLEDGECREATIONUNDERSTANDING ICTINEDUCATIONPolicyawarenessPolicyunderstandingPolicy innovationCURRICULUM ANDASSESSMENTBasic knowledge KnowledgeapplicationKnowledge societyskillsPEDAGOGY IntegratetechnologyComplex problemsolvingSelf managementICT Basic tools Complex tools Pervasive toolsORGANIZATION ANDADMINISTRATIONStandardclassroomCollaborativegroupsLearningorganizationsTEACHERPROFESSIONALLEARNINGDigital literacy Manage and guide Teacher as modellearner
  • EDUCATION FOR ALL Education offers engaging and fast-evolving learning environments education can be a driver for growth and empowerment Education enables them to improve the health of their family and thecommunity and to conserve the natural environment. It is through access to high-quality education for all, regardless ofgender, ethnicity, religion or language, that these personal contributionsare multiplied and the benefits of growth can be equitably distributed andenjoyed.
  • EDUCATION FOR ALL CONTINUES… Provide free and compulsory primary education to all Promote learning and life skills for young people and adults Increase adult literacy by 50% Achieve gender parity by 2005 and gender equality by 2015 Improve the quality of education
  • THE USE OF TECHNOLOGY FORTEACHING The policy goal of the technology literacy approach Teachers should be aware of these goals changes in the curriculum development of ICT skills into relevant curriculum Changes in pedagogical practice involve the use of various ICT toolsand digital content Changes in teacher practice involve knowing where and when to usetechnology .
  • TECHNOLOGY LITERACY INEDUCATION Technology in mother tongue teaching Technology use in classrooms can offer a new approach toone of the basic skills in the curriculum The aim of the of technology in education The use ICT to create and monitor individual and groupstudent project plans
  • IMPLEMENTATION OF TECHNOLOGY INEVERYDAY LEARNING design offerings clear rationale for the modules rationale of breadth professional learning activities shouldnot consist of a small number ofdisconnected competencies
  • THE USE OF ICTS IN SOCIETY ANDEDUCATION A global revolution is currently taking place in education and training. Education ‘s obligation to deliver information and communication technologies (ICTs) have the potential andcapacity to overcome learning barriers The ICT revolution has had an impact on curriculum development Africa is a developing continent lack of developed infrastructure for information and communicationtechnologies
  • THE USE OF ICTS IN SOCIETY ANDEDUCATION CONTINUES… Africa has adopted a renewal framework ICTs provide hope for overcoming barriers of social and geographicalisolation NEPAD recognises the pivotal role of ICTs in the establishment ofregional distance learning and health education programmes In order to realise the benefits of ICTs, Africa must develop andproduce a pool of ICT-proficient youth and students
  • THE USE OF ICTS IN SOUTHAFRICAN EDUCATION Former president Thabo Mbeki has underscored the importanceof ICTs In 2001 PNC on ISAD was established The Commission advises Government on the optimal use of ICTs At the same time, PIAC on ISAD was established The role of the Advisory Council the Ministry ‘s determined to direct the implementation of aprogressive programme for change
  • ACCESS TO ICT INFRASTRUCTURE Both teachers and leaners in FET must have access to ICT Software and hardware must be set by projecting the long-termtechnological needs of South Africa The Department of Education will establish a desired level oftechnology resources (hardware and software) for each GET and FETinstitution Planning and mobilisation of funds The Department of Education in collaboration with Department ofMinerals and Energy to prioritise the electrification programme for GETand FET institutions
  • ACCESS TO ICT INFRASTRUCTURECONTINUES… The Department of Education will establish minimum inter-operability standards Provincial education departments must prepare guidelinesfor GET and FET institutions The guide lines will describe how the provincial educationdepartments will ensure content Promotion and supporting of training progremmes and smallbusiness
  • KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY Knowledge is acquired through experience or education ICT can contribute in knowledgeable society The use of ITC to improve living conditions and theeducation system Society working together with the school to improve learningconditions Society that is thriving for grow and success
  •  teach mutual understandingbetween human beings Teach the ethics of humanity,preparing citizens of theworld communication collaboration New knowledge Access to knowledge New teaching and learning New tools, resources andpedagogies. New teaching professionBEING A TEACHER IN THEKNOWLEDGE SOCIETYMust teach Take into account
  • LEARNERS AND LIFELONG LEARNING INTHE KNOWLEDGE SOCIETY knowledge society every learner is a lifelong learner the curriculum , teaching methods and tools musttake into consideration the preparation for lifelonglearning progresses of lifelong learning Lifelong learning must be encouraged in all countries
  • Life long learningBetter society
  • THE USE OF INTERNET Internet is mainly a tool revolution of Internet Internet enhances our capacity for collective learning andintelligence Internet forces us to experiment new ways of being together, byproviding use with social networks such as: Facebook Twitter Blackberry massager etc.
  • PERVASIVENESS OF TECHNOLOGY The government is shaping and developing the process ofeducation by developing technology-enriched learningenvironments The successful integration of Technology into the classroom The teaching skills of the future encourage technology literacy, knowledge deepening and knowledgecreation
  • B R O A D A I M S O F T H E V A R I O U S N A T I O N A L A N DI N T E R N A T I O N A L I N I T I A T I V E S R E G A R D I N G C O N T I N U E SP R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E L O P M E N T O F T E A C H E R S The policy goal of technology use Related educational goals The Guidelines for Teacher Training and ProfessionalDevelopment in ICT is a step towards guiding the developmentof the ICT knowledge and skills of teachers to: Enhance the educational experience of learners in theimplementation of NCS
  • B R O A D A I M S O F T H E V A R I O U S N A T I O N A L A N DI N T E R N A T I O N A L I N I T I A T I V E S R E G A R D I N G C O N T I N U E SP R O F E S S I O N A L D E V E L O P M E N T O F T E A C H E R SC O N T I N U E S . . The Framework is an attempt to provide direction inaddressing the ICT training needs of teachers attempts to move away from imposing a narrow vision ofthe appropriate use of ICT in teaching and learning. Guidelines for Teacher Training and ProfessionalDevelopment in ICT will contribute towards themeaningful use of ICT in education
  • FUTURE NATIONAL OBJECTIVES Childhood development Eradicate child under- nutrition Schooling target South Africa aims on improving its position in internationalrankings Further education and training and skills development Higher education, science and technology
  • FUTURE NATIONAL OBJECTIVESCONTINUES… Lay a solid foundation for a long and healthy life andhigher education and science achievement. The following are achieved within 5 years All teachers will receive continues training Teachers in under performing schools will receivetraining Competency standards for all educators
  • EDUCATION AS KEY IN UNDERSTANDINGAND ADDRESSING SOCIAL PROBLEMS Half of children out of school live in delicate and conflictaffected states. Those states don’t equipped to address the challenges ofeducation Education can be a tool that can be used in addressing andeducating societies about social issues HIV/AIDS still poses an enormous threat to the educationalsector
  • THE STRUCTURE AND DOMAINS OFICTE TSA1. ENGAGEUNSTRUCTIONALDESIGN PROCESSES2. FACILITATE ANDINSPIRE STUDENTLEARNINGINNNOVATION ANDCREATIVITY3. CREATE ANDMANAGE EFFECTIVELEARNINGENVERONMENT4. ENGAGE INASSESSMENT ANDCOMMUNICTION OFSTUDENT LEARNING5. ENGAGE INPROFESSIONALDEVELOPMENT ANDMODEL ETHICSRESPONSIBILITIES.
  • TEACHERS MAKING A DIFFERENCE
  • ENGAGE IN INSTRUCTIONALDESIGN PROCESSESStage Knowledge Skills AttitudesEmerging Be aware of the importanceofinstructional design inteaching learningReview various approachestoinstructional designDevelop interest inusing instructionaldesign in teaching learningApplying Recognize and describe theapproaches for 1) analysingneeds and tasks for instruction,2) designing and developinginstruction using appropriatemedia and delivery systems,3) implementing instruction,4) evaluating instructionUse available approachesthatare claimed by the authorsforinstructional materials usingICTs in the specified subjectareasDemonstrate positiveattitudes in usinginstructional materialsdeveloped by othersand that promoteinstructional designapproaches in theirsubjects using ICTsInfusingExplain and criticize thepros and cons of variousapproaches for 1) analysingneeds and tasks forinstruction,Produce instruction by 1)conducting needs and tasksanalysis for instruction, 2)designing and developinginstruction using ICTs fortheirsubject areas and targetgroupsAppreciate the careand rigor needed indesigning instructionfor target learnersusing available ICTtools
  • LIST OF REFERENCESDepartment of education. (2007). Guidelines for teacher training and professionaldevelopment in ICT. South Africa: cape townDepartment of education. (2011-2014). Strategic plan. South African: cape townDelors, J., et al. 1999. Learning: The Treasure Within. Paris, UNESCO.Education for all by 2015. (2008). educational’s response to global monitoring report.Bnssels: BelguimNETS·T © 2008 International Society for Technology in Education.UNESCO. (2012). ICT-enhanced teacher standards for Africa. United nations.White paper on e-education: Government Gazette no. 26734 pg. 3. 26 September 2004.THE STELLENBOSCH DECLARATION ICT IN EDUCATION: MAKE IT WORK (IFIP,Stellenbosch, South Africa, July 2005)
  • LIST OF REFERENCES CONTINUES…UNESCO. 2005. Links between the Global Initiatives in Education. Paris, UNESCO.Van der Berg, S. Gustasson, N. Spaull, N. Armstrong, P. (2011). Improving quality educationin South Africa. A report prepared for the national planning commission.