NTLT 2012 - Sharing to reflect - reflecting to share
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

NTLT 2012 - Sharing to reflect - reflecting to share

on

  • 373 views

 

Statistics

Views

Total Views
373
Views on SlideShare
354
Embed Views
19

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 19

http://www.ntltconference.ac.nz 18
http://www.blogger.com 1

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment
  • Karakia – Tauparapara – Mihimihi – Whakatau Ka tangi te titi, ka tangi te kaka, ka tangi hoki ahau Whakataka te hau ki te uru, whakataka te hau ki te tonga kia makinakina ki uta kia mataratara ki tai, e hi ake ana te atakura he tio he huka he hauhu, tehei mauri ora. Te mihi tuatahi ka haere tenei mihi ki te kaihanga o nga mea katoa, ko koe ti timatanga, ko koe te whakamutunga. Te mihi tuarua ka haere tenei mihi ki te mana whenua o tenei whenua, mo tenei tono. Tena koutou. Te mihi Tuatoru, ka haere tenei mihi ki a koutou katoa, nau mai haere mai. A, tena koutou tena koutou kia ora mai tatou katoa. Hi everyone and welcome to our workshop: Sharing to reflect: Reflecting to share. The purpose of our presentation is to introduce you to the concept of Digital Storytelling and how we see it used in education to encourage learner engagement and reflective practice. We will be asking you to do some activities and will share some of the DST work we have done or plan to do. Thank you
  • General introductions. Cheryl first. How we started working together (invite from Cheryl) Justine next. Whanaungatanga Who are you?? (ask the audience) What is their work and why did they choose this workshop?
  • What do you know about DST? - talk to your neighbour about what you know about DST already.
  • Cheryl DST ‘began’ around 1993 – out of the Center for Digital Storytelling – with Dana Atcheley and Joe Lambert as key people. While Atcheley died in 2000 Joe Lambert continues to visit NZ and teach and inspire around the world. A famous project was capture wales in which Daniel Meadows travelled around wales to collect stories. Hear the wonderful accents.
  • These people tell us that stories are culturally based, help bridge gaps, enable reflection Permeate our lives informally as gossip/little narratives, grand narratives and formally as reports, assessments and constructed retelling (plays/movies/counselling/education) mostly about storytelling in a formal situation and a few about reflection
  • 7 Steps and how they relate to the 7 elements Own your insights – Point of View Own your Emotions – Emotional Content Find the moment – Dramatic Question Construct your story – drafting and thinking about my images and words Tell your story – get some friends together “the story circle” Get Feedback – critical Review your story Assemble your story – Pacing, Effectiveness, Economy, Visual representation (photos, timeline etc), Voice over or soundtrack/s Reflect and Review your Story – Economy Share your story again – Lambert et al, 2010 Pages 9-24 Publish & Share your story – Research outputs Reflection + dialogue= collaborative learning and reflection (Alterio & McDrury) Habermas’ communicative action: “takes place when we engage in dialogue for the purpose of making sense of our experience and working together to achieve our respective aims”. (Zepke, Nugent & leach, 2012). Activity – what are the main elements of DST? In pairs/fours (dependent on size of group) Feedback to wider group – Justine to take notes
  • Center for Digital storytelling have evolved the use of 7 elements for dst. 7 Steps and how they relate to the 7 elements Own your insights – Point of View Own your Emotions – Emotional Content Find the moment – Dramatic Question See your story – Visual representation (photos, timeline etc) Hear your story – Voice over or soundtrack/s Assemble your story – Pacing, Effectiveness, Economy Share your story – Lambert et al, 2010 Pages 9-24 Reflect and Review your Story – Economy Publish & Share your story – Research outputs Reflection + dialogue= collaborative learning and reflection (Alterio & McDrury) Habermas’ communicative action: “takes place when we engage in dialogue for the purpose of making sense of our experience and working together to achieve our respective aims”. (Zepke, Nugent & leach, 2012). Activity – what are the main elements of DST? In pairs/fours (dependent on size of group) Feedback to wider group – Justine to take notes
  • Justine – talk about indigenous context and decolonizing approach, and then show Kanes video and link to safety, trust and vulnerability. Cheryl – talk about the ‘racist teacher’ and how doing a ‘roleplay’ helped bring the story out. Link to safety, trust and vulnerability. Activity – in pairs Reflect on the stories you’ve just seen (5 mins) Tell your neighbour what you enjoyed about the stories Tell you neighbour what you didn’t enjoy about the stories Feedback to the wider group
  • Cheryl Justine (the listener – and why we encourage all students to participate) Connecting with context – establishing the space of safety for sharing personal stories, feedback of appreciation, deliberate guidelines before day starts. Listening to the story – starting the process that will be engaged in the Counselling room (learning to listen critically and reflectively) Clarifying events – what should I tell, what shouldn’t I, do I have permission from others involved in my world Engaging in critical reflective dialogue – looking at components of a story and making a connection. Constructing new knowledge - What do I do with this new knowledge and/or way of behaving? Group Activity – In groups of 3. Tell your story (everyone in group) Decide which story to develop further and explain why  which elements does it have?
  • Center for Digital storytelling have evolved the use of 7 elements for dst. 7 Steps and how they relate to the 7 elements Own your insights – Point of View Own your Emotions – Emotional Content Find the moment – Dramatic Question See your story – Visual representation (photos, timeline etc) Hear your story – Voice over or soundtrack/s Assemble your story – Pacing, Effectiveness, Economy Share your story – Lambert et al, 2010 Pages 9-24 Reflect and Review your Story – Economy Publish & Share your story – Research outputs Reflection + dialogue= collaborative learning and reflection (Alterio & McDrury) Habermas’ communicative action: “takes place when we engage in dialogue for the purpose of making sense of our experience and working together to achieve our respective aims”. (Zepke, Nugent & leach, 2012). Activity – what are the main elements of DST? In pairs/fours (dependent on size of group) Feedback to wider group – Justine to take notes

NTLT 2012 - Sharing to reflect - reflecting to share NTLT 2012 - Sharing to reflect - reflecting to share Presentation Transcript

  • Sharing to reflect: Reflecting to share Cheryl Brown & Justine Te Moananui-Makirere 1
  • Who are we?• Weltec• Porirua• Stories
  • Workshop Overview• What you know about DST?• History of DST (Joe Lambert) – short video• Share theories• Show ways we have used DST• Explore the importance of storytelling• Engage you in some thinking and reflection
  • What is Digital Story Telling? http://www.storycenter.org/history/
  • Why should we use it in education? To be successful as learning tool, storytelling processes must incorporate critical, reflective dialogue and establish shared meanings that enable us to examine, explain and creatively reconstruct events”. (Zepke, p.47).
  • How do we do it? Own your emotionsOwn your Insights Find the moment Construct your storyPublish your story Tell your story Reflect & review your story Get Feedback Assemble your story Review your story
  • Think of a storyTellers (this means all of you)•Think of a story you would like to tell and mullit over as we talk. Something about a great orbad learning experience might be appropriate.•Perhaps some of the things we say will help youclarify your story.•Then we’ll ask you to share the story - toinvolve listeners.
  • The 7 Elements of DST• Point of view• Dramatic question• Emotional content• Voice• Soundtrack• Economy• Pacing
  • DST in Education? The Racist Teacher The Racist Teacher My teacher My teacher Temaia DST in Treaty of Waitangi & Cultural Responsiveness Course Assessments (Ko Wai Au) ..Ko Wai AuKo Wai Au.avi
  • Alterio & McDrury (in Zepke)Levels of engagement: tellers and listeners Teller Listener Connecting with context Connecting with context Telling the story Listening to the story Clarifying events Clarifying events Engaging in dialogue (critical and Engaging in critical reflective reflective) dialogue Constructing new knowledge Constructing new knowledge
  • Activity•In groups of 3.•Tell your story (everyone in group)•Decide which story to develop further and explain why−which elements does it have?
  • Reminder: 7 elements• Point of view• Dramatic question• Emotional content• Voice• Soundtrack• Economy• Pacing
  • Tell your stories to the group• What story was chosen?• Why?• What’s important?• What are the main elements?
  • How will you use DST in your teaching?• Discussion and Feedback
  • References & Further ReadingAlterio, M & McDrury, J. (2012). Collaborative learning using reflective storytelling. In Zepke, N,Nugent, D & Leach, L. (eds) Reflection to transformation. (pp. 40-57). Wellington, NZ: DunmorePress.Attwood, B & and Magowan, F. (2001). (Eds). Telling stories. Wellington, New Zealand: BridgetWilliams Books.Center for Digital Storytelling. Retrieved from: http://www.storycenter.org/history/Fulford, R. (1999). The triumph of narrative: Storytelling in the age of mass culture. Toronto,Canada: Anansi. Retrieved from http://www.robertfulford.com/NarrativePreface.htmlMakwakwa, V. (n.d). Capture Wales: Tell your story. [Web log message]. Retrieved fromhttp://www.speak2bfree.com/blog/tag/capture-wales/Smith, L.T (2006). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and indigenous peoples. Dunedin, NewZealand. University of Otago Press.