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NTLT 2012 - Pecha Kucha 2, Alison Campbell - Turning a lecture on its head: Flip teaching in the university classroom
 

NTLT 2012 - Pecha Kucha 2, Alison Campbell - Turning a lecture on its head: Flip teaching in the university classroom

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    NTLT 2012 - Pecha Kucha 2, Alison Campbell - Turning a lecture on its head: Flip teaching in the university classroom NTLT 2012 - Pecha Kucha 2, Alison Campbell - Turning a lecture on its head: Flip teaching in the university classroom Presentation Transcript

    • Turning a lecture on its head: flip teaching in the university classroom Alison Campbell1 & Kevin Gould2 Flipping lectures is harder than it looks (FYBEC 2011)© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 1
    • „Flipping‟ lectures – treating lectures as really, really large tutorials, where the students do the work. Opportunities for active learning. Necessary content as reading assignments (or from prior lectures).© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 2
    • Research-based, has positive impact on students‟ learning e.g. Deslauriers L., Schelew E., & Wieman C. (2011). Improved learning in a large-enrolment physics class. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332 (6031), 862-4 PMID: 21566198© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 3
    • Control classes ‘Flip’ class Attendance 55-57% 75% Engagement 45% 85% Test before (mean) 47% 47% Test after (mean) 41% 74% 77% felt that they‟d learn more if the entire first-year physics course was taught that way. (from: Deslauriers, Schelew & Wieman, 2011)© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 4
    • Haak D.C., HilleRisLambers J., Pitre E., & Freeman S. (2011). Increased structure and active learning reduce the achievement gap in introductory biology. Science (New York, N.Y.), 332(6034), 1213-6 25.00% PMID: 21636776 20.00% fail rate, Caucasian 15.00% & non-Caucasian students Haak et al. (2011) 10.00% 5.00% 0.00%© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 5
    • Their study looked at the impacts of: Original teaching style: traditional lecture format. First „treatment‟: lectures plus daily MC questions & weekly practice tests. Second „treatment‟: no lectures: pre-class reading quizzes, daily MC questions, weekly practice tests, extensive group work in class.© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 6
    • “The highly structured [third] approach resulted in another increase in overall performance by all students, compared with the low-structure, lecture-intensive course with no required active learning and the moderate-structure design based on clickers and a weekly practice exam.” “… although all students benefit from [highly structured teaching], [non-Caucasian] students experience a disproportionate benefit.” from Haak, HilleRisLambers, Pitre, & Freeman (2011).© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 7
    • Design-a-plant 15 October 2012 8
    • © THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 9
    • © THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 10
    • © THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 11
    • © THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 12
    • How did students perceive this form of learning? Please comment on the „design-a-plant‟ and „design-an-animal‟ exercises – what was their impact on your understanding of plant & animal form & function? These were great as it put to work what had been learned (or not) & gave me a better idea of I found these to be a how many things are waste of a lecture as they interrelated. didn‟t enhance my Good – maybe understanding at all. could be mini- assignments or done in tuts to not use up lecture time?© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 13
    • Very helpful way to use the information we had acquired. Helped to back up my understanding Positive impact on understanding of concepts. Very useful, reinforces previous knowledge & lectures in a fun way. Helpful and fun. Made you really think about Able to comprehend the environmental suitable life-forms factors affecting applicable to given animal/plant design. environments and utilise the info learned in lectures in a practical manner.© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 14
    • What else do students gain? • Peer-assisted learning • Practice at written & oral communication of ideas • Group work© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 15
    • But remember to: • Plan carefully. • Explain carefully what you are going to do, and why. • Assess learning appropriately.© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 16
    • So, why not give flip teaching a go?© THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO • TE WHARE WANANGA O WAIKATO 15 October 2012 17