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Mr.Fransisco has given amazing speech and shared this beautiful presentation on higher education. I am sharing the same for your reference.

Mr.Fransisco has given amazing speech and shared this beautiful presentation on higher education. I am sharing the same for your reference.

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higher education presentation - World bank Document Transcript

  • 1. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org snoitutitsnI cimedacA rof ecnerefnoC lanoitanretnI aidnI ,tarajuG 3 1 0 2 , 9 yr a u n a J Francisco Marmolejo Tertiary Education Coordinator The World Bank fmarmolejo@worldbank.orghttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 1
  • 2. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Dominique Moisi. Geopolitics of Emotions (2009)http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 2
  • 3. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org International trends in higher education International trends in higher education Massification Massification Still asymmetrical access / retention/ graduation Still asymmetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks frameworks Financing higher education Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The academic profession The research environment The research environment Information and communications technology Information and communications technologyhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 3
  • 4. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org 260 Upper secondary and post secondary non-tertiary = 100 Sub-Saharan Africa Arab states Southern and 240 3% 5% Central and West Asia 220 Eastern Europe 12% 200 14% 180 Central Asia 160 1% 140 120 100 80 60 40 North America and Western East Asia and Europe Latin America Pacific 25% and Caribbean Male-tertiary Female-tertiary Male-below upper sec Female-below upper sec 29% 11% Source: OECD (2004) Education at a Glance: OECD Indicators 2004, Table A11.1a, p.175. Access Rates in Higher Education and GDP Per Capitahttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 4
  • 5. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org International trends in higher education Massification Still asymmetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The research environment Information and communications technology More than ever more people are having access to higher education …http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 5
  • 6. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org International trends in higher education Massification Still asymmetrical access / retention/ graduation Latin America & Oceania Africa the Caribbean 9% 4% Asia Increasing international student mobility 2% 12% Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The research environment North America Information and communications technology 23% Europe 50% Source: OECD (2012) Education at a Glance International trends in higher education Massification Still asymmetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The research environment Information and communications technologyhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 6
  • 7. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org ¿Sequential? Multi-task?http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 7
  • 8. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org I have a netbook, MP3 International trends in higher education Players, flashdrive, IPAD… Dad, what did you use in Massification school when you were student? Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility My brain!! Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The research environment Information and communications technology International trends in higher education International trends in higher education Massification Massification Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks frameworks Financing higher education Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The academic profession The research environment The research environment Information and communications technology Information and communications technologyhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 8
  • 9. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Public vs. private higher education institutions in Brazil Número de Ins tuiciones en la Educación Superior - Brasil 1997-2009 2.500 2.160 2.000 1.500 1.000 689 500 252 211 0 1997 2009 En Sector Privado 689 2.160 En Sector Público 211 252 Out of 2.412 HEIs in Brazil, only 252 are public Private & Confidential 34 International trends in higher education International trends in higher education Massification Massification Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation Increasing international student mobility Increasing international student mobility Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Quality assurance, accountability and qualification Quality assurance, accountability and qualification frameworks frameworks Financing higher education Financing higher education The private providers’ revolution The private providers’ revolution The academic profession The academic profession The research environment The research environment Information and communications technology Information and communications technologyhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 9
  • 10. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org International trends in higher education Massification . Still asymetrical access / retention/ graduation World OECD countries Increasing international student mobility USA Japan Revolution in teaching, learning and curriculum Germany France Quality assurance, accountability and qualification South Korea frameworks Engand Netherlands Financing higher education China World: 47,022 Canada USA: 13,715 The private providers’ revolution Israel India China: 667 The academic profession Norway India: 161 Brazil The research environment New Zaeland Portugal Information and communications technology Taiwan Mexico 0 5000 10000 15000 20000 25000 30000 35000 40000 45000 50000 Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.eduhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 10
  • 11. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org …Implications for higher education Yes, but…http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 11
  • 12. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Every wants one No one knows what it is No one knows how to get one Philip G. Altbach (2004) “World Class”: “Ranking among the foremost in the world; of an international standard of excellence” Webster Dictionaryhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 12
  • 13. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org 50 51http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 13
  • 14. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Concentration of Talent Students Teaching Staff . Researchers Top Leading-Edge Graduates Research Supportive Resources WCU Regulatory Framework Favorable Public Budget Autonomy Governance Resources . Dynamic Academic . Endowment Revenues Technology Freedom Tuition Fees Transfer Research Grants Leadership Team Strategic Vision Culture of Excellence Source: Salmi (2009) Source: Salmi (2009) Source: Salmi (2009)http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 14
  • 15. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Source: Salmi (2009) Share of Undergraduate Graduate University Graduate Faculty members / Researchers Students Students Students (%) Harvard 7,002 10,094 59 Incoming students Stanford 6,442 11,325 64 Proper balance between undergraduate and MIT 4,066 6,140 60 Oxford 11,106 6,601 37 graduate students Cambridge 12,284 6,649 35 LSE 4,254 4,386 51 Beijing 14,662 16,666 53 Tokyo 15,466 12,676 45http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 15
  • 16. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Faculty members / researchers Incoming students Proper balance of undergraduate vs. graduate students International dimension John Hudzik It is essential that it be embraced by International students: It shapes institutional ethos and values and institutional leadership, governance, touches the entire higher education faculty, students, and all academic service Harvard (19%) enterprise. and support units. Cambridge (18%) COMPREHENSIVE INTERNATIONALIZATION Foreign professors: Caltech (37%) The global reconfiguration of economies, systems of trade, research, and Harvard (30%) Not only impacts all of campus life but the communication, and the impact of global institution’s external frames of reference, forces on local life, dramatically expand the Oxford (36%) partnerships, and relations. need for comprehensive internationalization and the motivations Cambridge (33%) and purposes driving it. John Hudzikhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 16
  • 17. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org More than 3.3 million students abroad. It is forecasted that by 2020 there will be 7 million international students. . 1975 1980 1990 1995 2000 2004 2006 2008 Source: OECD and UNESCO Institute for Statistics (for data on non-OECD countries and up to 1995). 2009 OECD average % 22 20 18 • It is forecasted that by 2020 16 the number will increase to 7 14 million international students 12 10 8 6 4 2 0 Hungary Norway Belgium Australia United Kingdom Austria Netherlands United States Slovak Republic Slovenia Switzerland Iceland Finland Poland Sweden Japan Spain Chile Canada¹ Denmark Portugal Estonia New Zealand Irelandhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 17
  • 18. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Major players: U.S.A., U.K. and Australia Middle powers: France, Germany, Spain, Italy Evolving destinations: Canada, New Zealand, Japan Emerging contenders: Malaysia, China, Singapore Source: Verbik, L. et al. (2007) International Student Mobility: Patterns and Trends. The Observatory on Borderless Higher Education Korea: 4.6% India: 6.8% China: 17.1% Source: OECD Education at a Glance 2010http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 18
  • 19. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org 2006 2002 Other Austria OCDE 9% 2% Italy Swiss 2% 2% U.S.A. Belgium 20% 2% Spain 2% Japan England 4% 14% France 9% Germany 12% Australia 10% Students traveling abroad for a short period of time with their “imported” teacher, remaining together, continuing to speak mainly their own language even while abroad, and having just a superficial glimpse at the foreign culture and peoplehttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 19
  • 20. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Who needs international education anyway? Internationalized curriculum Foreign language competency “In the 21st Century there will be only two kinds of people: Those who think globally, Dual/joint degrees and those who are looking for work” International certification of competencies International Accreditation Significant presence in relevant international consortia Peter F. Drucker Francisco Marmolejo fmarmole@email.arizona.edu A good idea, but.. A critical need Source of prestige and $$$ Means for better education About mobility of bodies About mobility of societes Marginal Mainstreamed A priority for “tomorrow” A priority for ”yesterday”http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 20
  • 21. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Government support (*): GDP equivalent based on PPP Source: OECD. Education at a Glance 2010 81 http://www.beerkens.info/blog/atom.xmlhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 21
  • 22. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Government funding Endowments Endowment Endowment EUA Inglaterra (Millones USD 2005) (Millones USD 2005) Government funding Harvard University 25,460 Cambridge 6,080 Endowments Yale University 15,200 Oxford 5,320 Tuition and fees Stanford University 12,160 Edinburgh 340 Significant research funding University of Texas 11,590 Manchester 228 Efficient financial and administrative management practices Princeton University 11,210 Glasgow 228http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 22
  • 23. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Used in 100 higher education institutions in MENA countries. Voluntary participation. Institutional level: • Review of governance practices compared with self-defined benchmarks National level: • Review of overall public policies Expansion to other regionshttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 23
  • 24. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org TIPO TALENTO RECURSOS GOVERNANZA Universidad de -Estudiantes y investigación profesorado de excelencia. +++ +++ -Enfasis en posgrado Universidad de -Concentración en Enseñanza estudiantes de licenciatura ++ +++ U.Tecnológica -Diversidad de matrícula -Excelente + +++ profesorado para enseñanza técnica y pedagogía Universidad -Diversidad de Abierta alumnado -Excelente + +++ …All depends of… profesorado para la enseñanza a distanciahttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 24
  • 25. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org There is not a single formula… China What may work in one case… South Korea Singapur & Malaysia Russia India Mexico Nigeria Chile …may not be the best solution in another case Continuing doing things the same way, but expecting to have different results Source: Salmi (2009)http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 25
  • 26. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org For every complex problem there is an answer that is clear, simple, …and wrong. H. L. Menckenhttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 26
  • 27. Francisco Marmolejo 1/11/2013fmarmolejo@worldbank.org Francisco Marmolejo Tertiary Education Coordinator The World Bank Tel. +1 (202) 458-5927 Email: fmarmolejo@worldbank.org http://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary http://conahec.orghttp://www.worldbank.org/education/tertiary 27