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Excel DAYS360 Function
 

Excel DAYS360 Function

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This presentation is to define Excel's DAYS360 Function.

This presentation is to define Excel's DAYS360 Function.

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    Excel DAYS360 Function Excel DAYS360 Function Presentation Transcript

    • EXCEL DAYS360 FUNCTION 30/360 DAYS COUNT CONVENTION By Nooruddin Surani
    • Introduction
      • The Gregorian calendar is the internationally accepted civil calendar. But due to different number of days in different months makes it difficult to work on financial calculations using Gregorian calendar
      • While working on Financial Models it is easy to deal with 30/360 days year as most of the financial, corporate & municipal institutions follow the same
      Gregorian calendar. (2010, March 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15:25, March 19, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gregorian_calendar&oldid=350173459 No. Name Days 1 January 31 2 February 28 or 29 3 March 31 4 April 30 5 May 31 6 June 30 7 July 31 8 August 31 9 September 30 10 October 31 11 November 30 12 December 31
    • Working with 30/360 Days with Excel
      • In Excel it is very easy to work with 30/360 Days Count Convention
      • Syntax: =DAYS360(START_DATE, END_DATE, [METHOD])
      • Where START_DATE is the first date and END_DATE is the last date of the period
    • Example 1
      • My date of birth is 7-Dec-1973 today’s date is 19-Mar-2010, follow the example to understand the same.
    • Conclusion
      • You can use Excel’s DAYS360 function to calculate difference in two dates
      • This function will eliminate the confusion with Gregorian Calendar regarding different number of days in different months, even different number of days in leap years
      • Syntax: =DAYS360(START_DATE, END_DATE, [METHOD])
      • Where START_DATE is the first date and END_DATE is the last date of the period
    • References
      • Gregorian calendar. (2010, March 16). In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 15:25, March 19, 2010, from http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Gregorian_calendar&oldid=350173459