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Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
Jameson  - ux report
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Jameson - ux report

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  • 1. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESUX/UI Documentation prepared by Chris Znerold
  • 2. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESIntroductionUSER TESTING RECAP KEY FINDINGSOn February 13th and 14th, nineteen user testing recruits took part in a usability screening in which There are 3 areas of the site that were identified as being the most actionable in terms of timing and impact:they were asked to navigate through the Jameson1780 website. ONBOARDING: The onboarding experience was the primary pain point for the majority users tested. Most of this dealt with the need toUsers were asked to complete a survey before they began using the site as well as a survey after they were connect with Facebook. Users had concerns about why they needed to use their Facebook account to play the game; whatfinished. This survey data was digitized and included in the internal review process that established information the game would access and how they would use it; and whether or not the game would post to their newsfeeddetailed recommendations for how to best improve the user experience. without their knowledge. Additionally, the Facebook plugin that was implemented to connect to Facebook allowed for user edge cases to develop due to it’s ability to selectively remove permissions, or skip them altogether. In addition to theIn addition to the survey data, each users screen activity and webcam were recorded in order to capture problems that connecting with Facebook created, another issue was the time it took many users to go from entering thethe areas in which they were struggling to progress through the experience. These recordings, along with site to finding the first clue. Many were lost or confused, and zoomed in and out of the map or scrolled around lookingan a/v recording of the test facilities and moderation instructions were also compiled and included as a for hints as to what to do next.part of the internal review process. VIRALITY:Finally, detailed observations gathered from the moderator about each users activity and experience on Each character, clue, and location garnered a different level of emotional response for each user. Many had strong visceralthe site was digitized and recapped internally with the EVB team, and helped guide the direction of reactions to a particular video clue, and expressed a desire to share an individual scene to Facebook before reaching therecommended changes to the site. The internal review process involved finding commonalities among end of the game. Given the opportunity, many users would have actively pushed the content that interested them most tothe user group with regard to where they struggled, as well as where they succeeded, in navigating the site their social audience.and solving the quandary. NAVIGATION:At the end of the internal review, three areas of concern were identified and potential solutions to While some users quickly picked up on the mechanics behind moving from one clue to the next in a quick and efficientaddress these concerns were vetted by the creative, user experience, and technical teams to ensure that manner, most had hangups that prevented them from having a cohesive narrative experience. Many users clicked theany proposed changes fell in line with the brand ethos, programmatical feasibility, and usability trunk to view the clue after each video in order to confirm what the had seen. Others would go back and watch a videoobjectives set forth in the initial test plan. twice in order to be absolutely sure of the clue. Almost all users would spend time looking around the map for what they were supposed to click on next after watching a video. Some users would find it more quickly than others, but they allUSER EXPERIENCE STATISTICS TO CONSIDER: expressed frustration at the time it took to move from one clue to the next. In addition to the difficulty in navigating4/19 Users didn’t sign in with Facebook. between clues, users who entered the site without their Facebook account had no motivation or messaging from the site9/13 Users didn’t share their experience with Facebook to course correct and re-sign into Facebook to complete the experience.13/15 Users who signed in with Facebook successfully completed the game. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 2/9
  • 3. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESApplication Landing Screen APPLICATION LANDING SCREEN ONBOARDING In order to help users understand why we need to access their Facebook account in order to let them play the game, we plan to update the age-gate landing page to include a graphical component that helps users see at a glance the advantages to signing in with Facebook. Additionally, we plan to make it more clear to users that if they don’t sign in with Facebook, they are only able to participate in a preview of the game and can’t actually play. Finally, we plan to integrate a privacy component that explicitly states that the app won’t post to a users Facebook account without permission or store any of their information. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 3/9
  • 4. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESFacebook Permissions Dialog FACEBOOK PERMISSIONS DIALOG ONBOARDING In its current iteration the Facebook Dialog box requires three clicks in order to accept permissions, and allows users to selectively opt-out or skip them entirely while still entering the site. In order to expedite the onboarding experience the permissions user flow will be shortened to include just one screen that requires a single click and cannot be selectively disallowed or skipped. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 4/9
  • 5. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESSuspect Preview Dialog SUSPECT PREVIEW DIALOG ONBOARDING In its current iteration the Facebook Dialog box requires three clicks in order to accept permissions, and allows users to selectively opt-out or skip them entirely while still entering the site. In order to expedite the onboarding experience the permissions user flow will be shortened to include just one screen that requires a single click and cannot be selectively disallowed or skipped. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 5/9
  • 6. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESVideo Clue End Card VIDEO CLUE END CARD NAVIGATION In order to eliminate the difficulties that users had in advancing between video clues, the end of each clue will now include an end card that enables users to advance directly to the next level without having to navigate or interact with the map. After selecting this option, users are shown the map view and the next Dubliner they are supposed to visit will begin loading automatically. In addition to auto-advancing to the next clue, users also have the option to either share the clue to Facebook or replay the video. SHARING CLUES TO FACEBOOK VIRALITY At the end of each level, users will have the option to share the clue they just received to their Facebook news feed. Each post will include an image of the Dubliner they met with, along with a dynamic text description that includes the contents of the clue itself and a link to play the game. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 6/9
  • 7. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESGame Complete End Card GAME COMPLETE END CARD VIRALITY, NAVIGATION After a user has successfully guessed the culprit, they will be shown an end card that allows them to share the confession letter to Facebook, replay the game, or browse the map. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 7/9
  • 8. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESMap Browse Mode MAP BROWSE MODE NAVIGATION At the end of the game a user can choose to enter a mode where they can pan, zoom, and interact with the map and its included components. Users can replay the video clues, watch the TVC ads, or choose to restart the game with an alternate culprit. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 8/9
  • 9. JAMESON 1780 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATESNon Facebok User Dialog NON FACEBOOK USER DIALOG NAVIGATION Upon entering the application, and after each subsequent video clue watched, users who have not yet signed in with Facebook will be prompted to sign in to actually play the game. They will also be given an option to continue the game in preview mode, but are strongly encouraged after every point ofinteraction to sign in with Facebook and start playing. JAMESON 1700 USER EXPERIENCE UPDATES Prepared by Chris Znerold 9/9

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